CTMA News

    Sources Sought: Engine Life Management Assistance

    On behalf of the USAF Propulsion Enterprise, NCMS is seeking sources with capabilities in the domain of life management program for engine fracture critical components to ensure engine flight safety.  Life Management is a comprehensive and continuous effort using analytical modeling and empirical data to determine fatigue life limitations/fracture points of critical safety items under applicable mission use.  Typically this effort is provided by the engine OEM via the Component Improvement Program (CIP).

    T400:

    Life Management for the engine was provided by PW Canada through the Navy CIP.  Life limits are published and administered as AF Tech Data.   Since Navy retirement of the engine, this endeavor has not continued and PWC has indicated an unwillingness to continue this support.  Contractor shall undertake life management starting with updating AF UH-1N mission usage and verify current published life limits are valid.  Subsequent work shall include fleet surveillance of usage and perform analytical evaluations of component characteristics as necessary to maintain life cycle management

    T53:

    Life Management for the engine is issued by FAA.  Life limits are published and administered via Commercial Tech Data and FAA Airworthiness Directives (AD).  These limits are based on commercial usage which may not reflect AF mission use. Contractor shall perform AF mission analysis to verify FAA limits are applicable for AF use.  This is a one time effort.





    Primary Contact

    Technical Contact


    T400T53

    Capabilities Summary

    Past Experience

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    Strategy and Innovation; Enterprise Innovation Management Phase II

    Today, everyone is continually seeking out methods on how to minimize risk and improve benefits by adopting newer and ever evolving technology. Public industries within production, maintenance, and sustainment realms know that innovation is a force multiplier critical for product development and business success, as many of the products and services you and I purchase are positively or negatively influenced by social and other electronic media. Small and large businesses alike know it will not be good enough to just ‘adopt’ the next emerging technology but, more crucial is ‘looking over the horizon’ to anticipate and envision the application of potential game changing solutions.

    Similar to the necessity faced in within the public sector, the Department of the Navy (DON) needs to embrace differing and unique options while at the same time harnessing leading-edge technology enablers. The objectives of this collaborative agreement are to build upon Phase I efforts by 1) sustaining the DON Innovation Vision by supporting and improving the effectiveness of the current state of DON innovation tools and processes; 2) execute and document effective innovative practices; and 3) revise the Enterprise Innovation Management Blueprint. This work will help forecast technology developments and provide a framework to help plan and coordinate technology developments in both the public industry sectors and the DON.

    Those interested in participating in this Phase II initiative should contact Jeff Walker, jeffw@ncms.org or (360) 782-1370 by May 31st, 2017. We encourage participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs), including Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs).

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    Call for Technology: Spin Pit Testing of Jet Engine Fan Disk

    Spin Pit Testing of Jet Engine Fan Disk:

    • Require spin pit testing of 6 fan disks to confirm fatigue life and fracture mechanics.
    • Low Cycle Fatigue limit and Fracture Mechanics results from Finite Element Analysis and risk assessment are already complete.
    • Physical verification of fatigue initiation site and crack growth pattern is required through spin pit analysis.
    • Bladed fan disk is ~50 inches in diameter, weighs ~136 pounds, and spins at ~10,000 RPMs.
    • These are used disks that will have multiple non-destructive inspections completed to confirm starting conditions.
    • Expect USAF and Original Equipment Manufacturer engineering participation in testing and evaluation of results.

    Point of Contract:
    Debbie Lilu, NCMS
    debral@ncms.org
    (734) 995-7038

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    Call for Technology: On-Wing Non-Destructive Inspection (NDI) of Jet Engine Fan Disk

     

    On-Wing Non-Destructive Inspection (NDI) of Jet Engine Fan Disk:

    • Require on-wing NDI for sub-surface fatigue crack with minimal engine disassembly.
    • Crack initiates inside the blade slot area.
    • Physical access is limited.
    • Borescope and Eddy Current inspections will not produce acceptable Probability of Detection.
    • Ultrasonic inspection is most likely known method to produce acceptable results. Other inspection methods would be considered, if Probability of Detection can be established.

    Point of Contract:
    Debbie Lilu, NCMS
    debral@ncms.org
    (734) 995-7038

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    Sources Sought: Reverse Engineering for Air Force Components

    On behalf of the Department of the Air Force/Air Force Materiel Command, NCMS is seeking sources with capabilities in the domain reverse engineering and reproduction of Air Force Components.

    Various components of the KC-135, F107, and T-38 family of aircraft are in need or upgrade or replacement. The Department of the Air Force/Air Force Materiel Command has requested information on companies capable of reverse engineering such components and providing Complete Technical Data Package and Prototypes. NCMS plans to determine qualified suppliers from which it can solicit products as need arises.

    Components include:

    KC-135 Fuel Flow Transmitter
    NSN: 6620-01-148-4354
    Part Number: 8TJ85GHY3
    T.O.:  5L13-2-20-3/4

    Description:  Transmitter, Rate of Flow, Fuel operates in conjunction with a low-frequency power supply and a flow meter indicator to measure the mass rate of fuel flow.

    F107-101 – 4th Stage Compressor Disk
    NSN: 2840-01-158-5967
    Part Number: 37253
    T.O.: 2J-F107-3

    Special Note:  Additive Manufacturing and Repair Development capabilities will be considered for this item, in addition to Reverse Engineering.

    Description:  Acts as part of the low speed compression system, by imparting a radial velocity component to the incoming air.

    F107-101 – 3rd Stage Nozzle and Sleeve
    NSN: 2840-01-126-6923
    Part Number: 34668
    T.O.: 2J-F107-3

    Special Note:  Additive Manufacturing and Repair Development capabilities will be considered for this item, in addition to Reverse Engineering.

    Description:  Acts as part of the low speed turbine system.  The nozzle directs the exiting combustion gases at the proper angle for the 3rd stage turbine rotor.  The inner sleeve is an abradable coating, supplying a gas seal during engine operation.

    F107-101 – Interstage Housing
    NSN: 2840-01-158-5959
    Part Number: 37441, 37428 and 37227
    T.O.: 2J-F107-3

    Description:  The interstage housing serves several functions.  It is the housing for the high speed compression system.  It also acts as the mounting point for the engine gearbox and engine mounts for the air vehicle.

    F107 Stage 2nd Turbine Nozzle Housing
    NSN: 2840-01-235-2277
    Part Number: 36847
    T.O.: 2J-F107-3/4

    Description:  This part is the 2nd stage nozzle for the F107 engine. This assembly houses the #4 and #5 bearings and has three sets of internal tubing. One set of tubing is for air while the other two are the oil supply and oil scavenge. This part is directly aft of the HP rotor and forward of the 2nd stage turbine.

    F107 2nd Stage Turbine Rotor 336412
    NSN: 2840-01-143-3834
    Part Number: 37909
    T.O.: 2J-F107-3/4

    Description: This part is the 2nd stage turbine for the F107 engine. This turbine disk has a seal runner on the forward end and a set of knife edge seals (labyrinth seal) on the aft end. This part has an interference fit with the LP shaft and the 3rd stage turbine. The blades of the turbine are integrated to the disk. This part is directly aft of the 2nd stage nozzle and forward of the 3rd stage nozzle.

    F107 3rd Stage Turbine Rotor 336412
    NSN: 2840-01-126-6908
    Part Number: 23494
    T.O.: 2J-F107-3/4

    Description: This part is the 3rd stage turbine for the F107 engine. This turbine disk has a set of knife edge seals (labyrinth seal) on the forward end and a smaller set of knife edge seals on the aft end. This part has an interference fit with the LP shaft and the 2nd stage turbine. The blades of the turbine are integrated to the disk. This part is directly aft of the 3rd stage nozzle and forward of the rear housing.

    T-38 A&B – Tap Element
    NSN: 6615-00-131-8819
    Part Number: 24901-00101
    T.O.: 5A6-2-3-3/4

    Description:  Resistance element is an electrical wire which is used to connect the potentiometer elements to the sensor circuit for calibration and fine adjustment purpose during the test.

    T-38 A&B – Resistant Element Assembly
    NSN: 6615-00-919-3811
    Part Number: 21108-05801
    T.O.: 24901-00101

    Special Note:  Additive Manufacturing and Repair Development capabilities will be considered for this item, in addition to Reverse Engineering.

    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences creates professional relationships and business opportunities, drives cutting-edge R & D, and leverages industry intelligence from a technical perspective. We are an established non-profit dedicated to working with world-class organizations with innovative technologies who are looking to innovate with reduced risk, create technologies quickly and economically at the highest quality. Our collaborative model leverages cross-industry expertise that creates a climate of success. NCMS is unique as a national network with the primary goal of fostering innovation through collaboration, with emphasis on Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) 4-7.

    The collection period for Sources Sought Reverse for Engineering for Air Force Components will end on Thursday, April 27th, 2017.





    Primary Contact

    Technical Contact


    KC-135 Fuel Flow TransmitterF107-101 – 4th Stage Compressor DiskF107-101 – 3rd Stage Nozzle and SleeveF107-101 – Interstage HousingF107 Stage 2nd Turbine Nozzle HousingF107 2nd Stage Turbine Rotor 336412F107 3rd Stage Turbine Rotor 336412T-38 A&B – Tap ElementT-38 A&B – Resistant Element Assembly

    Capabilities Summary

    Past Experience

     

    This is a Request for information (RFI) announcement.  This is not a solicitation for proposal; therefore, a solicitation number has not been assigned.  No reimbursement will be made for any costs associated with providing information in response to this RFI or any follow-up information requests.  This RFI is issued for the purpose of collecting market research, solely for informational, planning, identification of capable sources/recommended strategy and if this effort can be competitive or a Small Business Set-Aside.  The information provided in response to this RFI is for discussion purposes and any potential strategy that may be developed from these discussions would be the subject of a separate, future announcement.

    The information received in response to this RFI will not be shared with competitors, but may be utilized by the Government in developing an acquisition strategy, and requirement documents (i.e.; Statement of Objectives, Performance Work Statement [PWS], or Purchase Description). The Air Force requires that only non-proprietary information be submitted in response to this RFI.  The Air Force shall not be liable for or suffer any consequential damages for the use of any proprietary information submitted.

    A determination by the Government not to compete this potential acquisition, based upon responses received to this notice, is solely within the discretion of the Government.  Information received will be considered solely for the purpose of on-going market research.

    Respondents should not submit proprietary data.

    The Government will not pay for any information submitted as a result of this sources sought synopsis.  A response to this sources sought synopsis is NOT a request to be added to a prospective bidders list or to receive a copy of the solicitation.  If a solicitation is issued, it will be posted later at https://www.fbo.gov and all interested parties must respond to that solicitation announcement separately from the responses to this announcement.  This sources sought synopsis shall not be construed as an obligation on the part of the Government to acquire any products or services.

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    Project Announcement: Superior Energy Infrastructure Maintenance and Sustainment

    The objective of this project is to develop superior energy infrastructure sustainment and maintenance practices in support of the Air Force (AF) mission.

    As installation infrastructure continues to degrade, installations become more vulnerable to system failures and service disruptions. Furthermore, concurrent advances in technology make interdiction of the infrastructure more feasible by non-DoD actors. Additionally, advances in commercially available energy infrastructure technology are available to support mission readiness by enhancing performance and minimizing vulnerability.

    The customer seeks to engage with Air Force Mission Owners to develop energy projects that support the mission by leveraging technology and sustainment and maintenance practices to maximize support to our Airmen by minimizing the vulnerabilities in the infrastructure supporting them. CTMA anticipates that this mission-oriented assessment will result in frameworks and solutions that can be scaled across the services as well as across the country’s utility regulatory authorities as they continue to develop models that incorporate enhanced services to their customers by leveraging technological advances in associated infrastructure and services.

    Those interested in participating in this project should contact Marc Sharp, marcs@ncms.org or (734) 995-7051 by May 31, 2017. We encourage participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs), including Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs).

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    Project Announcement: Process Development for Air Force Energy Infrastructure

    The objective of this project is to develop a framework and process set to inform Air Force policy recommendations on energy infrastructure maintenance and sustainment practices to optimize mission support.

    As installation infrastructure continues to age and deteriorate, Air Force facilities become more vulnerable to system failures and service disruptions. Furthermore, concurrent advances in technology make interdiction of the infrastructure more feasible by non-DoD actors. Additionally, advances in commercially available energy infrastructure technology are available to support mission readiness by enhancing performance and minimizing vulnerability.

    The customer believes that a policy-level solution would be useful in identifying, planning, and executing energy infrastructure projects, sustainment, and maintenance practices that incorporate the mission implications to infrastructure vulnerabilities and the mission-related consequences of system failures and service disruptions. The goal of the policy would be to equip execution offices with guidance and requirements to inform their capital planning and sustainment of energy-related infrastructure at the installations.

    CTMA anticipates that this mission-oriented policy will result in more effective solutions employed across the DoD. Because these solutions will be dependent on using industry to meet Air Force requirements we believe that the resulting projects will result in first-of-a-kind innovations that will be scaled across the services as well as across the country’s utility regulatory authorities who continue to develop models that incorporate enhanced services to their customers by leveraging technological advances in associated infrastructure and services.

    Those interested in participating in this project should contact Marc Sharp, marcs@ncms.org or (734) 995-7051 by May 31, 2017. We encourage participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs), including Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs).

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    Project Announcement: Technical Studies, Analyses for Intermittent Fault Detection Isolation System (IFDIS) Implementation Across DoD

    A potentially faulty electronic system in the field can compromise reliability and safety for the public. Electronic maintenance poses an ever-increasing challenge for the artisan today because of the limitations of current No Found Fault (NFF) equipment and training to the public.  The reduced size of electronic chips, coupled with increases in their interactions and complexities of equipment, have led to difficulties in diagnosing system faults when these faults occur at the component level and are intermittent in nature.  Often this very expensive equipment is replaced and not repaired, thus increasing transportation costs for the general public.  Electrical wiring faults cover a wide variety of weapon systems across all the services, and hence are an entirely appropriate issue to be addressed by this study and to implement best practices across the DoD. This study will also provide cost estimates to execute the implementation strategy and the potential benefits to the Military Services.

    The purpose of this study is to build upon the experiences of Fleet Readiness Center South West and Hill Air Force Base in utilizing the IFDIS to assess the best strategy to implement this game-changing electronics maintenance capability across the DoD and at all levels of maintenance.

    This project will provide recommendations for closing the gaps, adopting IFDIS, and enabling capability. Guidance in the form of strategy documents, policy, doctrine, and standards to enable the integrated, coordinated implementation of IFDIS capabilities across the DoD will be developed. A benefit analysis through integrated review of process models, business use cases, capabilities, and scenarios will provide both the general public and DoD deployment options necessary to support their organizations.

    Those interested in participating in this initiative should contact Dana Ellis, danae@ncms.org or (360) 782-1370 by July 31, 2017. We encourage participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs), including Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs).

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    Project Announcement: Supply Item Logistics Capability Initiative

    Possessing the ability to quickly and accurately assess quality and quantities for parts and components from more than one supplier, while meeting specific maintenance or sustainment requirements is an issue that industry has yet to fully overcome.  They also require an enterprise management solution that will continue to support daily business processes while offering an advantage at some level over their foreign competitors. Fulfilling customer expectations is the first rule of business today.  However, when more than one manufacture draws from the same supplier(s), and there is a requirement to track and manage products as they are delivered to end user customers (such as for recall notifications), the failure to predict and mitigate these shortfalls (and replacement items) produces a substantial negative impact on the safety of merchandise sold to the general public.

    The U.S. Navy is facing similar problems within their logistics supply chain.  Developing a feasible solution to these supply and tracking issues within a large organization such as the U.S. Navy will demonstrate to the public sector what solutions are possible.  The results are expected to be easily transferable to commercial industry, positively impacting the quality and availability of products sold to you and me.

    The intent of this project is to develop a solution for two major business functions applicable to commercial and public business today:

    • Instantaneous inventory updates and prioritization of supply parts for manufacturing.
    • Real-time tracking of pieces and parts as they are drawn from inventory and their resulting life cycle of owners.

    Those interested in participating in this initiative should contact Jeff Walker, jeffw@ncms.org or (360) 782-1370 by May 31, 2017. We encourage participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs), including Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs).

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    Project Announcement: Item Master Logistic Capability Initiative Phase II

    As businesses across the country consistently seek out mitigation and look for solutions to their IT shortfalls, design for standardization, cataloging and effectively identifying parts for distribution while being able to quickly isolate defective parts is an issue that has plagued industry for decades and continues today. Fulfilling general public expectations is normally the first rule of business today, but companies that fail to adequately recognize substandard practices and systems that result in defective materials will place public safety at risk.

    The U.S. Air Force (USAF) is also researching ways to improve its cataloging operations which are conducted within the framework of the Federal Catalog Program. The intent of this Phase II effort is to use USAF logistic systems to facilitate integration for a production ready solution encompassing two lines of business:  Item Master Logistics Capability Initiative (IMLCI) and a Munitions Management capability. Tactically, this effort will provide the Munitions community with a transformational product suite, executing in both connected and disconnected environments. Commercial adaptation of projects efforts will not only allow for more effective cataloging processes but, reduce the risk associated with stocking parts manufactured from multiple suppliers. Should a defective part be identified, producers, maintenance and sustainment industries coupled with service providers will know what assemblies are affected and can immediately warn the general public of any impending danger.

    Those interested in participating in this Phase II initiative should contact Jeff Walker, jeffw@ncms.org or (360) 782-1370 by May 31, 2017. We encourage participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs), including Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs).

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    Project Announcement: Supply Item Logistics Capability Initiative

    Possessing the ability to quickly and accurately assess quality and quantities for parts and components from more than one supplier, while meeting specific maintenance or sustainment requirements is an issue that industry has yet to fully overcome.  They also require an enterprise management solution that will continue to support daily business processes while offering an advantage at some level over their foreign competitors. Fulfilling customer expectations is the first rule of business today.  However, when more than one manufacturer draws from the same supplier(s), and there is a requirement to track and manage products as they are delivered to end user customers (such as for recall notifications), the failure to predict and mitigate these shortfalls (and replace the items) produces a substantial negative impact on the safety of merchandise sold to the general public.

    The U.S. Navy is facing similar problems within their logistics supply chain.  Developing a feasible solution to these supply and tracking issues within a large organization such as the U.S. Navy will demonstrate to the public sector what solutions are possible.  The results are expected to be easily transferable to commercial industry, positively impacting the quality and availability of products sold to you and me.

    The intent of this project is to develop a solution for two major business functions applicable to commercial and public business today:

    • Instantaneous inventory updates and prioritization of supply parts for manufacturing.
    • Real-time tracking of pieces and parts as they are drawn from inventory and their resulting life cycle of owners.

    Those interested in participating in this initiative should contact Jeff Walker, jeffw@ncms.org or (360) 782-1370 by by May 31, 2017. We encourage participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs), including Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs).

     

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    Project Announcement: Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) for Integrating Maintenance and Sustainment Program Requirements Through an Asset’s Lifecycle – Phase II

    Like many commercial companies, the Air Force (AF) logistics and engineering communities lack a standardized and integrated method of accessing Product Lifecycle Information (PLI), managing configuration control of said PLI, synchronizing changes among PLI, and sharing the PLI with downstream consumers (e.g., maintenance, planning). This results in unplanned, manual intervention of limited manpower resources on activities to create, maintain, and update product information before use.

    The objective of this project is to use the AF PLM-CI as a surrogate to industry to improve maintenance and sustainment support thus reducing operational costs and for the military, increasing warfighter readiness. Specifically, weapon system early maintenance and sustainment requirements will be addressed during the DoD 5000.02. The adoption of configuration management with a strong PLM backbone can increase collaboration with industry, DoD, and their suppliers, resulting in more streamlined processes across a product’s life cycle. This paradigm shift will greatly reduce total ownership costs for industry and improve readiness for the warfighter.

    Those interested in participating in this initiative should contact Dana Ellis, danae@ncms.org or (360) 782-1370 him by May 31, 2017. We encourage participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs), including Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs).

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    Congratulations to Thermal Wave Imaging; Winners of the 2017 CTMA Technology Competition

    Thermal Wave Imaging Wins 2017 CTMA Technology Competition

    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) and the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Maintenance Policy and Programs (MPP) are pleased to announce Thermal Wave Imaging, Inc. (TWI) as the winner of the 2017 Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) Competition.  TWI’s winning submission, the Large-Standoff Large-Area Thermography (LASLAT) system, submitted by Project Engineer Maria Beemer and TWI President Dr. Steven Shepard, addresses the challenges in performing nondestructive inspection on large composite aircraft structures, where sub-surface flaws that may compromise structural integrity are difficult to detect using conventional methods.  The award, presented at the 2017 CTMA Annual Partners meeting in Salt Lake City on April 5, 2017, includes $125,000 to the company and one year of project management by NCMS to accelerate commercialization of the technology.

    TWI was awarded 1st place from a field of 57 entrants. Six finalists, including  4D Technology, Concurrent Technologies Corporation, Eastern Michigan University, Fabrisonic, and Ridgetop Group, Inc., were invited to Salt Lake City to present a brief overview of their technology, followed by questions by judges during a “Shark Tank” session.  Judges were composed of industry and DoD leadership including: OSD Maintenance, U.S. Navy – Joint Staff, NAVSEA, U.S. Air Force, Air Force Materiel Command, NCMS, Army Materiel Command, and Dassault.

    Located in Ferndale, MI, TWI is an NCMS member company, and the world leader in development and manufacture of Thermographic Non-Destructive Testing (TNDT) systems, used for Quality Assurance (QA) and manufacturing process control in the aerospace, power generation, and automotive industries. TWI solutions, ranging from low-cost, hand-held instruments to fully automated large-scale systems, serve as a platform for customers to increase manufacturing efficiencies, reduce cost and build safer, more robust end products.

    TWI's long-standing commitment to innovation has been demonstrated in numerous SBIR, STTR, and BAA contracts that include 3 SBIR Success Stories and internal R&D that has generated 22 patents.  Successful transition of TWI technology to the marketplace has led to several game-changing products including: VoyageIR, the first high-performance handheld thermographic inspection system; the TAFIS system for automated detection of blockages in turbine engine components; and the Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) method, for which, TWI received the 2014 ASNT Research Innovation Award.

    TWI products and technologies have become the worldwide standard of excellence in thermography, and are used in the most demanding applications by the world's largest companies and laboratories. Whether analyzing advanced materials for space vehicles, performing quality assurance on aircraft turbine blades or speeding up routine aircraft maintenance, TWI solutions address the full spectrum of NDT applications.

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    NCMS Opportunity: Power and Signal Cable Reverse Engineering and Development of Improved Maintenance and Reduce PM MRAP Material Shortages

    Deteriorating and aging cables that need replacing are a growing concern, but simply amassing and storing varieties of cables – which might not even fulfill the specific requirements – does not solve the problem. Instead, reverse engineering specific cables provides a faster, better solution to building just what is needed for a specific project.

    The MRAP Product Manager (PM) is conducting a RESET and standardization of their vehicle fleet.  Many items provided to the Army during initial MRAP fielding included commercial items delivered without a detailed technical data package.  As items such as cables, harnesses, and other interconnect technologies become damaged, obtaining replacement parts through normal Defense Logistics Agency channels become hampered by the lack of a complete Technical Data Package (TDP).  To overcome this obstacle, companies with the technical competencies to reverse engineer cables and develop TDPs concurrent with the delivery of technology ensures fleet readiness and increases competition for future procurements.

    The use of reverse engineering to develop needed cables in an as-needed basis is both economical and practical.  Benefits to industry and the general public include increased accessibility to production opportunities without restrictions imposed by non-availability of technical data packages or source controlled drawings.  That will in turn increase the opportunity to expand the supplier base and increase jobs.  Developing reverse engineering techniques for cables also benefits the public by allowing people to purchase only as much as they need, and not have to purchase and store extra cables.  Increased readiness rates of the nation’s MRAP fleet and a signification decrease in lifecycle cost of equipment through a reduction in man-hours for management of assets are just several of the benefits to the Department of Defense.

    This is a new initiative similar to but not related to the cable reverse engineering initiative announced in November. Those interested in participating in this initiative should contact Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, or (734) 995-4930 within 90 days (May 30, 2017) of this project announcement.  We encourage participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs), including Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs).

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    Automated Precision Inc. – Pioneering Advanced Dimensional Metrology Solutions

    Automated Precision Inc. is a global company providing advanced dimensional metrology solutions for industry. Founded by Dr. Kam Lau in 1987, API has pioneered progressively higher standards of accuracy through its 30 years of operation by commercializing innovative hardware and software that offer advanced digital information to its customers.  API supplies a comprehensive range of manual and automated dimensional inspection and 3D scanning products and software. Products include but not limited to 3D machine vision solutions, laser tracking, robot guidance, coordinate measuring machines, laser scanning, and advanced analysis software. Many of the world’s leading automotive, aerospace, energy, machine tool, and CMM manufacturers rely on API’s metrology solutions to assist in managing their complex manufacturing processes to improve quality, shorten product launch times, and reduce costs.

    API also provides dimensional inspection and metrology services including major project consulting, instrumentation calibration, machine tool error mapping, contract measurement including tool building, 3D CAD modeling, and reverse engineering. Headquartered in Rockville, Maryland (All Manufacturing, Finance & R&D), API has subsidiary operations in two other USA locations; Newport News, VA (Measurement Services) and Plymouth MI (Precision Automation Center).  API also has wholly owned subsidiaries providing pre/post sales, services, equipment repair and calibration in Heidelberg, Germany, San Jose, Brazil, Beijing & Singapore China, and Pune, India.  The company also has major representatives in Russia, Japan, Korea, Australia, South Africa, Israel, and southeast Asia.

    API invented the original laser tracking interferometer and holds the basic patents on the tracker technology.  In 1989, API licensed the tracker technology to Leica, Aaura, Switzerland and aided Leica over ten years in developing the first commercial laser tracker. To date, thousands of Leica Trackers utilizing API technology have been sold worldwide. It was not until 2001, that API introduced under its own name the next generation of laser trackers in a much smaller and portable package for commercial use.  Since 2001, API has introduced 4 generations of laser tracker improvements including advanced artificial intelligence, a host of hand-held and machine mounted accessories for the laser tracker, and user friendly calibration/automation software making these instruments more flexible and dependable for users.

    Listed below are the families of products, software and services offered by API worldwide:

    • 3D Tracker Systems – Laser Trackers are used in place of Coordinate Measuring Machines offering portable precision dimensional measurement capability on a factory floor or on large machine tools to measure precision parts. Laser trackers coupled with hand held probes and scanners as well as machine mounted accessories provide flexibility for users to optimize the trackers large volume precision measurement capabilities.  API manufactures 3 major product families of Laser Trackers and an assorted number of probes and scanners.  These families are:
      • Radian Laser Tracker
      • OmniTrac2 Laser Tracker
      • OmniTrac2 – Core Laser Tracker
      • Inteliprobe I-360
      • I Scan2+
      • V Probe
      • Smart Trak System
      • Active Target
    • Machine Tool Health - API's innovative patented, 5/6D Laser interferometer systems simultaneously measure linear straightness as well as pitch, yaw and roll. Use of the “XD systems” reduces the time required for machine tool or CMM calibration from days down to 2-3 hours. API also produces advanced spindle dynamic and thermal analysis systems called “Spindle Analyzer”, and a complete thermal and geometric error mapping (“Volumetric Error Compensation”) system for real-time compensation of CMM or CNC machining centers. Finally, API also offers a unique rotary and tilt axis measurement and calibration system called “Swivel Check”.
    • Automation

    Smart Factory Inspection System

    The Smart Factory Inspection System provides a flexible automated inspection to the industry. SFIS is a turn-key solution unifying laser tracker precision and non-contact 3D scanning for unmatched accuracy. SFIS Integrates:

    • Laser tracker
    • Robot & 3D scanner (RapidScan)
    • Intelligent Software backbone

    Using a laser tracker ensures total accuracy of the system by circumventing the inaccuracy of the robot. SFIS eliminates human intervention and repetitive inspection tasks in your manufacturing process.

    • 3D Non-Contact Scanning Systems

    Non-Destructive Inspection (NDI) for repair, maintenance & reverse engineering can be performed utilizing API’s precision I Scan2+ and an API Laser Tracker.  Large volume parts can now be inspected with ease and flexibility on the shop floor.

    • Measurement Services – In 2008, API launched its highly successful Global Services Division.  API Services specializes in three-dimensional measurements and high-value metrology solutions. API Services is home to some of the world’s leading three-dimensional metrology technical experts, with many certified by the Coordinate Metrology Society.  With over 200 years of combined metrology experience, API’s measurement specialists are the authority on the latest three-dimensional measurement systems such as laser trackers, digital photogrammetry, 3D laser scanning systems and other integrated systems.  Our core personnel come from the same industries we serve: aerospace, automotive, shipbuilding, machine tool and energy.  The machine tool calibration team is world-class, offering the latest machine compensation methods, including volumetric solutions.  Supporting our technical experts are API’s Engineering Team with 25 people having multiple Ph.D., Master’s and Bachelor Degrees.

    API Services technician providing a full 360 degree scan creating a virtual digital factory

    Automated Precision offers metrology products, dimensional inspection and services including consulting, calibration, machine tool error mapping, contract measurement, 3D CAD modeling and reverse engineering.  The continuous integration of the most advanced measurement technologies available today and superior customer support are the primary objectives of API Services.

    • CMM & Robotic Machines – API manufactures a complete line of high precision Horizontal Arm Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM’s) and an advanced Robotic Machine featuring a 5/6 axis high speed spindle capable of light milling, drilling, measuring and adaption of an area dimensional surface non-contact scanner. These CMM’s are featured in both single and dual columns and are designed to be highly customizable.
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    Funding Available for Environmental Technology Demonstrations

    ALEXANDRIA, VA, January 5, 2017—The Department of Defense (DoD), through the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP), supports the demonstration of technologies that address priority DoD environmental requirements.  The goal of ESTCP is to promote the transfer of innovative technologies through demonstrations that collect the data needed for regulatory and DoD end-user acceptance.  Projects conduct formal demonstrations at DoD facilities and sites in operational settings to document and validate improved performance and cost savings.

    ESTCP is seeking proposals for demonstrations of innovative environmental technologies as candidates for funding beginning in FY 2018.  The solicitation requests pre-proposals via Calls for Proposals to Federal organizations and via a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for Private Sector organizations.  Pre-proposals are due March 9, 2017 by 2 p.m. ET.

    Detailed instructions are on the ESTCP website under Funding Opportunities.

    DoD organizations (Service and Defense Agencies) may submit pre-proposals for demonstrations of innovative technologies in the following topic areas:

    • Environmental Restoration
    • Munitions Response in Underwater Environments
    • Resource Conservation and Resiliency
    • Weapons Systems and Platforms

    The Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) and Call for Proposals (CFP) for Federal Organizations Outside DoD are seeking pre-proposals for technologies in the following topic areas:

    • Innovative Technology Transfer Approaches
    • Long Term Management of Contaminated Aquatic Sediments
    • Management of Contaminated Groundwater
    • Detection, Classification, and Remediation of Military Munitions in Underwater Environments
    • Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for Safe and Cost Effective Natural Resources Management on Department of Defense Lands
    • Demonstration/Validation of Alternatives to Hexavalent Chromium in Manufacturing and Maintenance of Weapons Systems
    • Waste to Energy Converters for Overseas Contingency Operations

    If you have any questions, please contact the ESTCP Support Office at serdp-estcp.webinars@noblis.org  or by telephone at 571-372-6565.

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    Sources Sought for Military Grade Cables Directory

    On behalf of a DoD Sustainment customer, NCMS is seeking sources with capabilities in the domain of the design and manufacture of military grade cables. The family of Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles is undergoing RESET refurbishment and upgrading, and replacement cables are a major requirement. NCMS plans to develop a database of qualified suppliers from which it can solicit products as need arises.

    Please complete the following form to be considered for the directory.  If you have any questions about this initiative please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org), (734) 995-4930.





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    Technical Contact

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    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences creates professional relationships and business opportunities, drives cutting-edge R & D, and leverages industry intelligence from a technical perspective. We are an established non-profit dedicated to working with world-class organizations with innovative technologies who are looking to innovate with reduced risk, create technologies quickly and economically at the highest quality. Our collaborative model leverages cross-industry expertise that creates a climate of success. NCMS is unique as a national network with the primary goal of fostering innovation through collaboration, with emphasis on Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) 4-7.

     

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    2017 CTMA Annual Partners and Integrated Project Meeting Features IFDIS™ Tour

    During the 2017 CTMA Annual Partners and Integrated Project Meeting on Tuesday, 4 April 2017, at 1630, those interested in seeing the state of the art Intermittent Fault Detection & Isolation System™ (IFDIS™) - No Fault Found intermittent fault detection equipment, please join us for a tour.  You will be able to observe the IFDIS™ equipment’s capabilities first hand and the outstanding effort taking place today at Ogden Air Logistics Complex, Hill Air Force Base to detect and isolate faults in aircraft Weapon Replaceable Assemblies (WRAs) / Line Replaceable Units (LRUs).  WRA / LRU degradation is aggravated by complex physical forces consisting primarily of vibrational stress, temperature and humidity extremes, and a high operational tempo.

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    Troika Solutions plans for EFAC program deployment across the Department of Defense

    Troika Solutions is conducting a study to recommend a deployment plan for the Expeditionary Fluid Analysis Capability (EFAC) program across the Department of Defense ground vehicle fleet. This study is the result of another positive NCMS sponsored project for the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD).

    EFAC was designed to be a low cost, effective, deployable oil analysis device that helps maintain equipment availability and readiness while saving money and time for ground vehicle fleet maintainers. Troika Solutions’ pilot efforts include an assessment of the value of a hand-held fluid analyzer to enable analysis of fluid condition at the point of maintenance.

    The essential element of Condition Based Maintenance+ (CBM+) is conducting maintenance based on need rather than the calendar. One key way in which this can be implemented is the analysis of fluids such as lubricating oil and hydraulic fluid to determine serviceability. Having validated the value through these efforts, and with the input from Business Case Analyses conducted by the US Marine Corps I&L and the US Army AMSAA, Troika is now developing a recommended deployment plan for fielding of this capability throughout the Department of Defense.

    Every year thousands of gallons of still serviceable oil and hydraulic fluid are changed solely due to predetermined schedules regardless of the use the vehicles have seen during the period. The cost for this is substantial and includes disposal of the used oils. In addition, analysis of fluids presents an opportunity to assess the condition of the vehicle being used. For example, if anti-freeze is detected in motor oil, or water is detected in hydraulic fluid, these conditions indicate a potentially serious mechanical failure. If wear metal is detected it can indicate an array of possible failures and enable the maintainer to address them before actual failure occurs.

    EFAC enables maintainers in the field to examine the condition of fluids before changing them needlessly. It also provides an indication of vehicle condition in real time at the point of service.

    Troika Solutions, along with NCMS, has assembled a team of SMEs from across the DoD to develop a meaningful deployment recommendation. Troika Solutions is proud to be involved in this effort and is eager to support this valuable CBM+ capability.

    To learn more about EFAC or Troika Solutions, please visit Troika’s website or watch this EFAC video.   Questions and comments may also be sent to Bob Appleton or Frank Schuster via fschuster@troikasol.com or by calling (571) 375-7142.

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    Wishing our NCMS Members, Partners, and Friends a very Healthy, Happy and Prosperous New Year!

    A message from Rick Jarman, NCMS President:

    Thank all of you for making 2016 a very successful and exciting year. NCMS takes pride in leading cross-industry collaboration that creates technology innovation which forms the foundation of all our manufacturing programs. We look forward to working together to achieve even greater gains in these areas in the new year!

    In 2016, the Commercial Technology for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) Program managed by NCMS continued its significant growth while making valuable contributions to the equipment, systems, and tools available to our men and women in the armed services. We worked with a wide variety of services and companies to validate and demonstrate technologies that can immediately impact the maintenance and sustainment community of the Department of Defense. The annual CTMA Partners and Integrated Project Meeting was held in May at the Lockheed Martin Company Center of Innovation with over 240 attendees and 23 technology demonstrations - a real opportunity for collaboration!

    A highlight of the year was the first “CTMA Technology Challenge” with over 72 abstracts submitted for consideration. NCMS was proud to invest with the Department of Defense to recognize one company for its revolutionary technology solutions that have the promise to sustain our war-fighters in the future.

    Additionally, in 2016 we hosted NCMS Technology Showcases at Letterkenny and Tobyhanna Army Depots.  These Technology Showcases brought the best available commercial technologies onsite to the defense depots to help lead the way in their implementation.

    The National Advanced Mobility Consortium (NAMC) continued to grow and mature bringing new capabilities in ground robotics to the DoD. A highlight of 2016 was the "Innovative Soldier Workshop" held at NCMS to bring forward the best ideas from our nation's elite soldiers and industry for future fighting vehicles. The collaboration between the soldiers of the 10th Mountain and 82nd Airborne divisions of the U.S. Army, industrial designers, and government and industry subject matter experts gave a tremendous perspective in terms of user interface requirements of (class 3) mobile weapon systems.

    NCMS expanded our outreach across the nation from industry, academia, and government seeking the innovation that will sustain our nation's manufacturing base and was exemplified in our 2016 Michigan Robotics Day. A capacity crowd of almost 1,000 attendees gathered to witness the future of robotics, transportation, logistics, and autonomous vehicles.

    NCMS continued to build partnerships and projects with both the Departments of Energy and Transportation in 2016. Leveraging the NCMS collaboration model for DOE and DOT will offer greater opportunities in the future to a wider variety of companies-potentially expanding our network of member companies.

    And maybe most significantly, 2016 ended with a national conversation and a deeper look at manufacturing in the United States of America. This renewed interest will hopefully cause many to rethink the value that manufacturing brings to our nation's well being. While there can be no doubt that technology, automation and globalization have affected the loss of our jobs in America, the ease at which these jobs were outsourced or discontinued may deserve another look. Manufacturing still has a very high economic development multiplier that enables so many other jobs, and creates a strong economy for the communities, states and regions across our nation.

    At NCMS, we believe that the ability to make things in the U.S. will help ensure that companies here will be the ones to develop the next generation of manufacturing technology. We must create it, maintain it, and support the growth potential of the thousands of material and parts supplier companies that are required to be successful. Companies can’t do that without the next generation of technical talent, and that talent must be educated and trained with STEM knowledge and applied learning.

    NCMS is doing our part through our model of collaboration that leverages the talents and resources of many to keep innovation coming at lower cost with less risk to all - please join NCMS to give it a try! SAVE THE DATE for the 2017 CTMA Annual Partners and Integrated Project Meeting at Hill AFB, March 14-16.

    2017 should be another a great year and I look forward to working wth you all.

    Best Wishes,

    Rick Jarman

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    One Network - Air Force, NCMS and Industry Collaborate on Next Generation Expeditionary Logistics Systems

    Air Force, NCMS and Industry Collaborate on Next Generation Expeditionary Logistics Systems

    This December's Air Force Combat Ammunitions Center (AFCOMAC) training program at Beale Air Force Base, Sacramento, CA, is hosting a major National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) Program Event to prove out expeditionary logistics systems deployed under a unique partnership between the United States Air Force (USAF) and Industry.  This is part of a 9-month Risk Reduction program sponsored by Air Force Item Master and Air Force Munitions.

    AFCOMAC is an Air Force level training center administered by the 9th Munitions Squadron (MUNS), Beale AFB, CA. The mission of the 9th Munitions Squadron is to maximize the combat capability of the USAF by providing full spectrum combat munitions training as a Total Force Integration for all munitions personnel worldwide and ensure the highest level of support to the war fighter. The AFCOMAC training program consists of two separate courses. AFCOMAC provides combat-oriented instruction in Base Support Plan and Expeditionary Site Plan development and large-scale conventional munitions production using mass assembly techniques.  A two-phased program provides classroom academics (Phase 1) and an operational exercise called IRON-FLAG (Phase 2) of munitions support concepts and principles based on current Air Force Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures along with Combat lessons learned and Expeditionary Air Force operational concepts. The Senior Officers Orientation course is a 2-day program that provides combat munitions management orientation to majors (O-4 and civilian equivalent) and above in large scale munitions employment planning, production operations, and includes participation in the IRON FLAG exercise.

    The systems showcased at AFCOMAC are built upon an IT platform that has been configured jointly by One Network Enterprises (a global provider of secure, multi-party cloud business networks and a long-standing NCMS partner), Veteran Owned Small Businesses, the United States Marine Corps (USMC), and the United States Air Force. The intent of the software is to aid in the enhancement of logistics performance, asset custody management, health/safety/environment/security policy, data quality, and Master Data Management.

    When this technology was presented to USAF General Officer leadership four months ago, the order was given to demonstrate the agility of the platform by configuring a user application that fully represented the unique expeditionary training operations at AFCOMAC without sacrificing enterprise principles or strategic governance. One Network leverages Agile Software Development methodology internally and also applies an agile approach to systems deployment and delivery.   The logistics application, concept of operations, and agile strategy, were described by Department of Defense (DoD) leadership as “equivalent to the laser guided munitions in its importance to logistics IT – if demonstrated to be feasible.”

    Over the past four months, One Network executed on this mission, based on a 1-month sprint schedule and a weekly system deployment schedule. This provided maximum collaboration and continuous feedback from AFCOMAC and other USAF subject matter experts on the configuration of master data and user interfaces.

    The end result is an operational validation of the program approach to prove out agile strategy, realistic expeditionary capabilities, high levels of collaboration between functional experts and software configuration activities, and rapid software configuration. Master data used at AFCOMAC, while scrubbed so as not to include classified or other sensitive information, is fully representative of real war time operations.

    One Network based its approach on the following strategic imperatives:

    1. Getac Tablets and Disconnected Client:

    The USAF Munitions Community has fielded “Getac” Windows 10 Tablets with Integrated Barcode Scanners that have been ruggedized and HERO rated. While operating in CONUS, these Tablets operate with 3G/4G SIM Cards on the USAF network, giving them "intermittent" connectivity. Connectivity can be negatively impacted by operating in Reinforced Magazines or by operating in remote locations. While operating OCONUS, these Tablets cannot assume connectivity unless they connect by secure wireless, T1 line, or USB.

    Given these connectivity challenges and the desire to "Train as we Fight," One Network set out to configure its "Disconnected" architecture (optimized over several years through application at USMC) to deploy comprehensive digital capabilities at AFCOMAC.

    Getac-enablement allows for "Digital Point of Operation," wherein the operator manages an entire logistics operation, in real time, without paper - disconnected or connected -  while still operating at the "Pace of the Mission." One Network has designed its applications to meet this requirement while still allowing for the entire operation to switch over to paper if required.

    Disconnected capabilities are a natural byproduct of One Network’s Platform-to-Platform-Interface (P2PI) infrastructure, which has been configured specifically for military standards, to include:

    • Optimized Packet Size for Secure Radio Transmission
    • Store and Forward with Fault Tolerance, N+1 Replication, and Guaranteed Transmission
    • Optimized Transmission Type in High Latency, Low Bandwidth Zone
    • Optimized Synchronization Protocols for Transactional and Master Data – For example Push/Pull, Aggregates, Correct and Review, Transaction Routing
    • Defense Data Standards

    Disconnected mobile operations are part of One Network’s core strategy to create a “Digital” or “Cyber” Representation of a “Single Truth” or “Physical Reality.”

    2. FIAR - IUID, DLMS, and Audits

    This suite of "comprehensive digital capabilities" are tailored specificity to logistics and supply operations in a DoD Context, including those that meet specific mandates to achieve FIAR readiness. Achieving FIAR readiness is complex in itself even in fully connected environments.  FIAR readiness is all the more challenging when optimized for disconnected operations.

    Key FIAR areas of interest include:

    • "Item Unique Identification," or "IUID," is an intensive custodial serialization mandate that manages, tracks, and controls at the unique asset level that meets specific mandates from the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), and is key to FIAR-readiness. The USAF Munitions Community is adopting an "All IUID" strategy that will uniquely identify the entire supply chain, including missile assemblies, while retaining Lot Control of consumables and fast moving Small, Medium, and Large Caliber munitions. Serialization requires creative user interface design so that operations can continue to move at the "Pace to the Mission" despite the added challenge of managing serials. One Network's unique approach at AFCOMAC solves this problem out of the box, and is built upon years of field application at USMC and OSD.
    • Defense Logistics Management Standards (DLMS), is a comprehensive set of interface message sets that enable information flows between logistics and supply trading partners inside of the DoD and is also key to FIAR-readiness. Every inventory transaction in the DoD must be prepared to send or receive one or more DLMS messages, presenting a real challenge to Disconnected operations. One Network's IT architecture deployed at AFCOMAC supports DLMS out of the box for both Connected and Disconnected operations. One Network's unique approach at AFCOMAC is built upon years of application experience with USMC, the Defense Logistics Agency, and OSD.
    • Auditability is the cornerstone of a FIAR-ready posture. Transactional and inventory asset ledger data must be complete, verifiable, legitimate, and demonstrate quality and control. One Network's applications deployed at AFCOMAC meet FIAR auditability standards out of the box for both connected and disconnected operations. One Network's unique approach at AFCOMAC is built on years of field application at USMC and has been proven in FIAR audits with the USMC Munitions Community.

     

    3. Platform Development Ecosystem

    As a part of its collaboration with NCMS, One Network has worked to develop a network of organic engineering resources, and the AFCOMAC effort has been supported by resources from 3rd party Veteran Owned Small Businesses. One Network has also worked to train both Uniformed and Government Civilian engineering resources at USAF. Beyond AFCOMAC, in 2016 the ecosystem has lead the way in developing systems interfaces between USMC, Navy, Army, and Joint systems.

     

    4. Platform Development

    Thanks to the power of the One NetworkDefense Core platform, including prior NCMS efforts, all configuration for AFCOMAC is:

    1. Available to all Platform customers - All User Interfaces, Disconnected Features, Reports, etc,. can be leveraged for any class of supply for similar logistics operation, whether operated by Vendors, Contractors, or Uniformed Logisticians.
    2. Backwards Compatible - Any upgrades to the IT platform will not break AFCOMAC configurations or future efforts.
    3. Self Documenting - Through a unique hypertext markup language and a series of documentation tools, Master Data and Software Configuration, along with actual code, automatically represents itself as DoD compliant documentation. When augmentations or upgrades are made, the Documentation automatically regenerates itself.
    4. Automatically Traced to Requirements - automatic documentation extends also to Test Cases and Software Specification Line Items in a Requirements Traceability Matrix.
    5. Easily distributed to Disconnected Clients - any updates to software are pushed to Getac Windows 10 machines in a manner that dramatically reduces technical support or field maintenance.
    6. Responsive to any browser and/or screen size - user interfaces and applications automatically render in very large (TV), large (Desktop), medium (tablet or laptop), or small (handheld) screens, eliminating the need to maintain and support different applications for different device screen resolutions.
    7. The One Network Defense Core software features have deep roots in US Military and Prime Contractor/Vendor operations in CONUS, European, Central Asian, and Iraqi, theaters, and have been field tested in collaboration with NCMS over many programs and over several years. The One Network Defense Team is uniquely suited to handle the requirements, lexicon, culture, and concerns of the logistics communities of the US Military and their contractors and vendors.

    One Network specializes in developing Network Solutions for collaboration in complex value chains, and goes to market across multiple verticals including Defense, Automotive, Consumer Goods, Retail, Food and Beverage, and Healthcare. One Network is currently the supply chain backbone for all USMC Ground Munitions, and supports of US TRANSCOM CONUS Operations.

    If you would like to learn more about this this initiative, contact Jeff Walker at 360-782-1370 or jeffw@ncms.org.

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    J Chadwick Co Optical Micrometer replaces "Fingernail Test" used by Army

    hydrotubeinspectionJ Chadwick Co’s Optical Micrometer is a portable inspection microscope for measuring the depth of scratches, corrosion pits, and flaws on critical components. Defect classification is a vital aspect of maintenance and NDT simply because repair-or-replace decisions have a profound effect on cost and safety. When surface damage is found, maintainers must determine if a component is within tolerance or must be replaced. The Optical Micrometer outperforms legacy methods including the pit gage and the “fingernail test” (complete gage R&R study and testimonials can be found on J Chadwick Co’s website at www.jchadwickco.com).

    The subjective method of damage evaluation known as the “fingernail test”, which is used to determine scratch depth, is obviously inadequate; it relies heavily on guesswork and does not involve any traceable standards. Testimonials showed why other gages are generally not used on curved surfaces and do not produce reliable, repeatable results. These user opinions were validated by the gage R&R study. In addition to reducing the amount of guesswork, the Optical Micrometer can also enhance modern maintenance programs including CBM+, the “digital thread”, and more.

    For over 25 years the Optical Micrometer has been approved support equipment with NSN’s, GSA contract, and established calibration procedures.  It is listed in Air Force and Navy TM’s titled “Aircraft Weapon System Cleaning and Corrosion” (TO 1-1-691 and NAVAIR 01-1A-509 respectively); in the Army in TB 43-180 – “CALIBRATION AND REPAIR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF ARMY MATERIAL” (T-Level); and “TMD Preferred Equipment List” for PM Apache.fuselageweb

    The Army recently concluded a comprehensive evaluation of the Optical Micrometer, including a review of the gage R&R studies, comparison to legacy methods, and end-user input/testimonials. The result was a new requirement and placement of the Optical Micrometer in hundreds of Army Aviation Alpha 92 Toolsets (AVIM level).  The army anticipates a significant reduction in maintenance labor hours and ownership cost, as well as improvements to safety and readiness. It is hoped that other branches within the DoD will take advantage of the same time and cost-saving benefits now required by the Army.

    MAINTENANCE TOOL: Optical Micrometer P/N 8400K, NSN-6650-01-220-8942

    PURPOSE/USAGE:  Measures Depth of Surface Defects & Corrosion

    OEM/Manufacturer: J CHADWICK CO; Cage Code 65956

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    NCMS Member Navitas Systems Announces Award to Deploy StarlifterTM Lithium Forklift Batteries at Major Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Location

    Press Release:

    Navitas Systems Announces Award to Deploy StarlifterTM Lithium Forklift Batteries at Major Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Location

    Contract with National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) Enables DLA’s Largest Worldwide Site to Assess Performance Versus Lead Acid Forklift Batteries in Demanding Material-Handling Environment

    Woodridge, IL –December 5, 2016 – Navitas Systems LLC (www.navitassys.com), a leading provider of energy-enabled system solutions, energy storage products, and power electronics for commercial, industrial and government/military customers, announced today that it has been awarded a contract worth $422,000 and has completed initial deployment of its lithium-ion forklift batteries called StarlifterTM at the DLA’s single largest worldwide site, DLA Distribution Susquehanna, in New Cumberland, PA.

    The program objective is to evaluate the utility, feasibility, maintainability, and cost-effectiveness of replacing lead-acid batteries with fast-charging lithium-ion deep-cycle forklift batteries in DLA Distribution warehouses to potentially decrease total forklift battery maintenance costs and increase forklift operational readiness and productivity rates.

    Commercial and government customers alike have for decades utilized lead acid batteries to power electric forklift trucks. While these batteries are relatively inexpensive to purchase, they suffer from a number of significant drawbacks including slow recharging, fading performance while discharging, constant maintenance, and productivity downtime when changing batteries. Given both the historical performance limitations of lead acid, combined with the increased prevalence of fast chargers and new power-hungry AC forklift motors, there is a strong need for a better battery solution, particularly in intensive two and three shift operations and in cold temperature warehouse environments.

    The Eastern Distribution Center (EDC) of DLA Distribution Susquehanna, PA, is a 1.7 million square feet, high-ceiling building with 122 dock doors and over 322,000 storage locations.  Material is moved throughout the main building via 4.5 miles of conveyor lines, 5.3 miles of tow line pulling the 1,100 carts for the Automated Cart System (ACS), and over 400 pieces of conventional, manually-operated forklifts, order pickers, and carts.  The EDC operates six days a week with two day shifts.  During surges, typically resulting from increased military operations, EDC may operate seven days a week with three shifts.

    In the one-year assessment program, an equal number of Starlifter-powered and lead acid-powered forklifts of the same model-type will be instrumented to capture performance data in a number of use-case scenarios.  Key test objectives include: Validating and implementing a lithium battery which could potentially save money and significantly improve the efficiency of DLA distribution center operations across the Enterprise; determining any decrease in battery maintenance, replacement costs, and labor cost; determining the impact on forklift operational readiness and productivity; determining impact on energy usage; and determining impact on worker safety.

    The award comes from the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), an Ann Arbor, MI based not-for-profit 501©3 with nearly three decades of Government contracting and complex, collaborative research and development management experience. Through the development of collaborative partnerships, NCMS addresses strategic issues, brings innovations into commercial implementation, and leverages the resources and infrastructure of each participant to arrive at technology solutions that improve the competitive standing of our manufacturing base. It was the first and is still the best cross-sector consortium that is addressing the competitiveness of the nation’s manufacturers.

    “NCMS is committed to building and strengthening the US industrial supply base by working every day with NCMS member companies who create highly innovative technology solutions, such as Navitas Systems. This award indicates the confidence DLA has in Navitas’ technology and NCMS is proud to play a small role in bringing the parties together for the benefit of the DLA” said Rick Jarman, NCMS Executive Director and CEO.

    “We couldn’t pick a more demanding environment than at DLA Distribution to demonstrate the benefits of our Starlifter lithium forklift battery” said Mil Ovan, President/CMO of Navitas Systems.  “Driving productivity improvements in material handling is doubly satisfying for us, since it directly translates to speeding needed supplies to our Warfighters.  We’re delighted to be working closely with both DLA and NCMS in this important endeavor” Ovan concluded.

    Navitas is showcasing its Starlifter battery this week, December 5-8, in NCMS’ Booth # P411 at the Department of Defense Maintenance Symposium (http://www.sae.org/events/dod/) in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where maintenance executives share relevant information, identify critical issues, discuss key topics, and increase their awareness of Department of Defense maintenance initiatives.  A video being debuted at the Symposium describing the Starlifter lithium versus lead acid forklift battery trial at DLA Susquehanna is available here:  http://www.navitassys.com/products-systems/lithium-motive-battery-systems.

     

    About Navitas Systems, LLC

    Navitas Systems is a leader in integrated design, technology development, and manufacturing of innovative energy-enabled system solutions and energy storage products for commercial, industrial and government agency customers.  Navitas Systems products range from customized energy storage solutions for motive, idle-reduction and defense related applications, along with custom renewable energy integrated power systems, to standard products like lithium based lead-acid replacement batteries.  Our ruggedized lithium energy storage products are the perfect choice for any high-performance multi-cell battery application that requires lower weight, reduced volume, massively increased cycle life, higher efficiency, and environmental durability.

    Navitas is headquartered in a state-of-the-art 100,000 square foot facility in Woodridge, Illinois.   In early 2012, the company acquired the Government Solutions Group of lithium battery manufacturer A123 Systems.  With this acquired major research facility located in Ann Arbor, Michigan, along with strong local and offshore partners and solid financial stability, Navitas is well positioned to continue serving the energy products and power electronics needs of major worldwide customers.

    From advanced R&D, safe/high energy cell design, in-house electronics manufacturing and cable assemblies, to sophisticated battery pack assembly, Navitas Systems is your one-stop shop for comprehensive energy and power electronics solutions.  For more information on how to partner with Navitas Electronics please contact AJ Bedwell via email at abedwell@navitassys.com. For more information on Navitas Systems please visit www.navitassys.com and follow @Navitas_Systems on Twitter.

    About NCMS

    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, the largest cross industry collaborative Research & Development consortium in North America, is dedicated to driving innovation in commercial, defense, robotics and environmentally sustainable manufacturing. Celebrating its 30th anniversary, NCMS’ vast experience in the formation and management of complex, multi-partner collaborative R&D programs, is backed by corporate members representing virtually every manufacturing sector.

    For more information on NCMS, visit http://www.ncms.org/

    Media Contact: NCMS Director of Communication, Pam Hurt  phurt@ncms.org (248) 867-3525)

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    NCMS Members have strong showing at 2016 DoD Maintenance Symposium

    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) had an exhibit booth in support of the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program at the 2016 Department of Defense (DOD) Maintenance Symposium and Exhibition in Albuquerque, NM. In the booth, along with NCMS were six CTMA partners; Automated Precision Inc., Honeywell, One Network, Syntech, Navitas Systems, and Thermal Wave Imaging Inc. For bios about these NCMS member companies, abstracts are available below. Through the DoD’s mission for the Maintenance Symposium, our partners were able to interact in an environment that enabled attendees to share relevant information, identify critical issues, discuss key topics, and increase their awareness of Department of Defense maintenance initiatives with the following entities:

    • Government and industry maintenance managers of all ranks and levels
    • Defense logistics and resource managers
    • Military and civilian maintainers including executives, supervisors, technicians, and international counterparts
    • Program managers involved in life-cycle support and product support
    • Production, process, and information systems specialists
    • Researchers and product development representatives
    • Commercial maintainers and product support providers
    • Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs)
    • Engineers – maintenance, in-service, and process/industrial professionals who contribute to effective DOD maintenance operations

    Syntech
    Syntech is the most highly experienced company within the automated fueling and vehicle data management arena. For more than 37 years, Syntech has accumulated vast experience within the industry and demonstrated breadth and depth with its technical staff.  Syntech’s customer base consists of approximately 6,000 worldwide customers operating approximately 2.6 million vehicles.  Syntech also supports 13,600 automated fueling locations worldwide including 1,060 units within the Department of Defense at 452 separate locations.  Additionally, Syntech has the most comprehensive technical support team in the fueling automation industry with 8,200 units under active maintenance support at 3,300 unique locations.  Included among the customer base is the Department of Transportation for twenty-nine states, including sixteen statewide utilizations of the FuelMaster® systems and thirteen other DOT’s, utilizing FuelMaster® systems on a more limited basis.  Syntech has sold and supports around 300,000 Automotive Information Module (AIM) units, among 560 different customers; to include over 33,000 units installed in the U.S. Air Force’s general purpose fleet; 17,000 by the Department of Homeland Security agencies including CBP, FLETC and Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

    Honeywell
    Honeywell Safety and Productivity Solutions (SPS) is a global leader providing productivity solutions built around our high performance data collection hardware including rugged mobile computers, voice-enabled software, bar code scanners, radio frequency identification (RFID) and workflow printing solutions. Our solutions serve customers in aerospace, automotive, field service, healthcare, industrial, manufacturing, medical, retail, supply chain, test and measurement, and transportation and logistics markets. We provide unparalleled precision and durability that improves efficiency, increases operational productivity and enhances customer service capabilities. For more information on Honeywell sensing products, visit http://sensing.honeywell.com and on Honeywell productivity solutions visit http://www.honeywellaidc.com.

    Navitas Systems
    Navitas Systems—a small, woman-owned business—offers a range of advanced energy storage and smart power management products developed by its Advanced R&D team for vehicle idle-reduction, battery powered motive/material handling, mission critical, defense, renewable energy storage, and lead-acid replacement market segments. The company’s customers are commercial, industrial and government agencies who require highly engineered, technology-differentiated high performance battery products and systems.   The combination of Navitas’ government/military research and development engine with its commercial expertise in developing resilient and scalable battery solutions enable Navitas to continuously bring innovation to the advanced energy storage space and profitably scale innovation. By first developing innovative, high-performance solutions for its government/military customers, Navitas is able to design optimized solutions which can then scale into dual use commercial/military markets, thus lowering procurement costs across both markets.

    Automated Precision Inc.
    Automated Precision Inc. (API), founded in 1987 by the original inventor of laser tracker technology, Dr. Kam Lau, is a world leader in providing advanced digital information for various industries.  API fosters a corporate environment that continuously seeks and invests in state-of-the-art sensor technologies and artificial intelligence meeting current and future industry needs. In turn, API provides diverse 3D metrology products and solutions in the form of world’s most advanced laser trackers and related accessories, automated robotic metrology solutions, and machine tool health products. coordinate measurement solutions. API’s metrology products are used by many of the world’s leading automotive, aerospace, machine tool, and CMM manufacturers.

    The API team can significantly improve the quality of products, speed and processes of customers. API’s technology can help improve every step of the production process, from design to production. The API team can also create customized measurement solutions to fit diverse customer needs. With direct offices covering major continents, and with its resellers and partners around the world, Automated Precision Inc has a network of global support to provide quality service and support for its customers.

    One Network
    One Network is bringing the network to connect companies and their entire ecosystem to better serve their customers.  Founded in 2002, One Network offers patented solutions to multi-party business, including supply chain management, maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) operations.  One Network¹s cloud platform, the Real Time Value Network, eliminates the traditional divide between planning and execution and enables visibility and data to flow across the entire value chain of business partners ¬ in real time.  Additionally, One Network offers PaaS solutions and developer tools that enable organizations to design, build and run multi-party applications, creating solutions that ³never go legacy².  Leading organizations from around the world, from nearly every industry have joined One Network, helping to transform industries from Public Sector and Defense, Logistics, CPG, Healthcare, Automotive, and Retail.  With this leading technology, One Network has developed a 'Fit to Purpose' Defense Core that connects the warfighter to the network to see real-time visibility of Assets, Requisitions, Inventory, spares and more.  With One Network's patented Platform to Platform Integration (P2PI), the warfighter now has the ability to operate in disconnected environments for an extended period of time and connect back to the network as operational tempo allows, synchronizing and updating the entire enterprise.  This delivers total visibility within a multi-party, multi-echelon operating environment like the Department of Defense.

    Thermalwave
    Established in 1992, Thermal Wave Imaging (TWI) is well-known as the leader in the development and manufacture of thermographic Non-Destructive Test and Quality Assurance solutions for the aerospace, power generation and automotive industries. TWI has played a key role in transitioning thermography from the laboratory to the "real world", developing and implementing numerous advances that have become industry standards. TWI received the 2014 ASNT Research Innovation Award for its groundbreaking Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) method, which significantly improves the range, sensitivity and quantitative measurement capability of thermography beyond conventional approaches. Today, our products range from handheld units for on-aircraft inspection to automated inspection cells for the production floor.

     

     

    If interested in further opportunities with CTMA or NCMS, please reach out to Debbie Lilu at debral@ncms.org. Thank you.

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    NAVAIR/Thermal Wave Imaging, Inc. Win 2016 Maintenance Innovation Challenge

    dod-maintenance-symposium-191We would like to publically thank each of the 2016 MIC finalists for your outstanding performance during the entire MIC process. From participating in the coordination meetings, to providing professional briefing materials to quality and time standards, presenting to a packed house of roughly 400 maintainers, and representing not only your technology, but our community in the MIC booth in the exhibition hall. We also want to congratulate our 2016 MIC award winners:

    The winner of the 2016 Maintenance Innovation Challenge, as selected by senior DoD logisticians, is Clint Salter (NAVAIR) and Maria Beemer (Thermal Wave Imaging, Inc) for their innovation "Large Area Thermographic NDI of Composite Structures".

    dod-maintenance-symposium-188The "Peoples' Choice" winner, selected by the audience during the live presentations, is MGySgt Lance Baughman (HQ, Marine Corps, Installations & Logistics) for the innovation "USMC Expeditionary Fluid Analysis Capability (EFAC)".

    Congratulations to all the winners and a sincere appreciation to all the submitters who made this the largest and most competitive Maintenance Innovation Challenge competition to date. If you missed the 5 December presentations, a video recording of the six MIC finalists' presentations can be viewed at the below link:

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    NCMS Technology Showcase Recap

    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), in partnership with the Department of Defense (DoD), sponsored a technology showcase at the Letterkenny Army Depot (LEAD). The showcase took place on November 2nd and 3rd with Depot tours on the afternoon of November 2nd and showcase and demonstrations on the 3rd held in buildings 370 and 350. The LEAD Command Briefing and NCMS/CTMA program briefings are available for download here. Industry participants showcased their innovative technology solutions via table top displays and met directly with DoD maintenance personnel at LEAD.  If you are interested in attending a future showcase, please email Nicholas Brown at nicholasb@ncms.org.

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    Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) Society Annual Meeting

    phm-logoCTMA will be sponsoring a CBM+ panel at the upcoming Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) Society Annual Meeting in Denver, CO, October 2-8, 2016. The NCMS panel will include representatives from industry, academia & government with a focus on CBM+. PHM leaders attended the recent CTMA Partners Meeting and found the topic and the best practices shared to be relevant to their industry. The following individuals will be presenting or speaking at the conference:

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    2016 CTMA Technology Challenge Award Winner Announced

    2000px-honeywell_logoThe National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), the nation’s leader in collaborative technology development and the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Maintenance (OSD) recently announced the winner of the 2016 Commercial Technologies Maintenance Activities (CTMA) Technology Competition. Honeywell, Inc. won the award for the Voice Directed Maintenance and Inspections technology, submitted by Prakash Somasundaram. The award included $125,000 to the company and one year of project management by NCMS to manage the project through the technology demonstration phase. The competition was designed to drive focus on new and emerging technologies, introduce the next generation of maintenance innovation and enable improved readiness for the nation’s military services to the DoD maintenance facilities at reduced costs. Over 60+ highly innovative technologies were submitted by NCMS member companies and partners, were selected by members of the Joint Technology Exchange Group and are being considered for future integration into the DoD maintenance programs.

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    2016 CTMA Technology Competition

    Banner_TechCompetition2

    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) and the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Maintenance (OSD) has issued the 2016 CTMA Technology Competition designed to introduce new technologies to DoD’s maintenance facilities to help sustain materiel readiness at reduced costs. The Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) Program, a unique collaboration between NCMS and OSD, will administer this $125,000 competition in conjunction with this year’s CTMA Annual Partners and Integrated Project Meeting. NCMS membership is not a requirement. This competition is open to government, industry and academia.

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    Forbes features NCMS' work in Exoskeletons

    From Forbes

    The Rise of the Exoskeletons sounds like a science fiction motion picture coming to a theater near you. But it’s really an exciting development for future retirees and unretirees that just might help you work as long as you like.

    Scientists, researchers and high-tech companies are turning into reality the kind of mechanical marvels boomers lapped up watching The Six Million Dollar Man and RoboCop. The recent progress is nothing short of stunning, holding out the promise that exoskeletons and related robotic technologies could overcome the kinds of disabilities that prevent many older Americans from working. “Soon, we will have exoskeletons that improve mobility for older people,” says Steve Collins, professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.

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    2016 CTMA Annual Partners and Integrated Project Meeting


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    CTMA Annual Partners and Integrated Project Meeting

    10-12 May, 2016
    Lockheed Martin's Center for Innovation "The Lighthouse" (Visitor's Guide)
    Suffolk, VA
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    Event Overview

    Join us for the 2016 CTMA Annual Partners and Integrated Project Meeting, 10-12 May 2016 in Suffolk, VA at the Lockheed Martin Center for Innovation known as “The Lighthouse.” This year’s event, themed “Streamlined Innovation”, will feature interactive Maintenance Focus Technology Panels as well as multiple Tracks offered on predictive analytics, electronic maintenance, model-based definition, expeditionary maintenance, and much more. Your ideas, thoughts and enthusiasm will drive the next generation of maintenance innovation and enable improved readiness.

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    CTMA Project Announcement: Rapid Development and Acquisition Initiative

    The DoD is hampered by current policies, processes, and regulations, which govern development and acquisition to support maintenance and sustainment of the warfighter. Today, DoD’s focus is on executing independent programs that don’t take commercial best practices into consideration. These same policies, processes, and regulations limit industry’s ability to enter the defense industry market and implement industry acquisition best practices to DoD.

    In contrast, commercial businesses manage integrated product lines across multiple products and services. The DoD can leverage this model as a basis for acquisition and sustainment strategies to overcome policies, processes, and regulations that negatively impact the ability to meet mission demand. The DoD can foster dynamic and innovative solutions for tomorrow’s warfighter by designing acquisition and sustainment portfolios that deliver an integrated suite of capabilities.

    This initiative is designed to identify an alternative strategy, processes, and recommend policy changes that would align DoD processes more closely to industry best practices and enable the government to take advantage of efficiencies already proven by industry. The objective is to compare current DoD requiring, acquiring, and sustaining business processes and rules against best commercial business practices where integrated product line engineering and agile methods are applied.

    The collaborative partners on this CTMA initiative shall focus on the requirements within current DoD development and acquisition processes to respond to the maintenance and sustainment requirements to support the warfighter. Tasks will be:

    • Conduct a comparative assessment of JCIDS and Service specific process, practices, and business rules (Policy, Directives, Mandates, & Memos) against industry best-practices.
    • Prepare a report outlining gaps and friction-points in process, practice, and business rules to include recommendations for resolution.
    • Assess the monetary and non-monetary benefits for implementation of the recommendations.
    • Demonstrate best-practice engineering process activities based on overall project conclusions.
    • Demonstrate a product solution designed and developed while implementing the proposed processes and recommendations of the comparative assessment and proposed strategy.
    • Demonstrate the implementation of parallel/semi-parallel processes for requirements and prototype development of the solution.

    Through an application of industry best practices across the DoD development and acquisition process identified through this initiative, public and private industry is expected to benefit by having a less restrictive means for entering the defense industry market. Industry will have a new market for offering development best practices and improvements for legacy products. Additionally, industry will better understand the approach and requirements format for development and delivery of capabilities to DoD activities, and associated DoD industry partners.

    As a by-product of this initiative, several specific benefits applicable to the entire DoD will be identified and quantified. When widely adopted, DoD stands to benefit from clear requirements development and acquisition practices through a reduced supply and maintenance burden that improves equipment availability. This will ultimately translate into supply, maintenance management and maintenance touch labor reductions. This will not only ease the burden of impending reductions in USMC/DoD end strength, but also reduce the required number of spares and consumable parts needed – and all of the deployment and distribution required to supply these items to deployed units which operate the equipment more heavily than in garrison training.

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    2015 DOD Maintenance Symposium

    CTMA_2015DoDMaintenanceSymposium_20150801

    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) will be showcasing many maintenance capabilities at Innovation Station, a Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA). CTMA is a joint Department of Defense/NCMS effort promoting collaborative technology development, demonstration, and transition within DoD. Its objective is to ensure American troops and their equipment are ready to face any situation, with the most up-to-date and best-maintained platforms and tools available. With that in mind, the CTMA technologies that will be at this year’s event are as follows; Eclypse International, GE Digital, Siemens, SolAviTek, Sprectro Scientific, Stratasys and Universal Synaptics.

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    2015 NCMS Technology Showcase

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    NCMS Showcase stitches Additive technology to Predictive Innovation together with Digital thread for DoD Maintenance and Sustainment

    In a dual track event at George Mason University last week, NCMS presented another Technology Showcase as part of its continuing series of events that feature technology and industry solutions for the most current and demanding applications. These events have proven to be the drivers of collaboration projects that offer innovative sustainable solutions at less cost with faster deployment.

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    CTMA Project Announcement: Predictive Analytics Health Monitoring for Ship Equipment

    Controlling maintenance costs is a critical to commercial industry in order to secure and retain market share/competitive advantage. Reducing maintenance cost is also a critical mission for the Defense Department in today’s budget-constrained environment.

    One of the most promising avenues for delivering enhanced maintenance performance is in the area of data analytics, specifically in using data collected by sensors on military assets to predict, and hence avoid, costly failures. Commercial industry has already taken dramatic step forwards in this field, leveraging a combination of embedded sensors, local storage and processing, and remote monitoring and diagnostics, to eliminate unplanned downtime, increase asset availability, and reduce maintenance cost. Given the similarity between the heavy equipment used by the military and some of their counterparts in heavy industry (aircraft engines, diesel engines, gas turbines, pumps, compressors, etc.) there is reason to believe that the military could derive significant value by leveraging COTS predictive analytics technologies.

    In 2014, General Dynamics Mission Systems (GDMS) and IBM invested more than $1M internal R&D dollars in the application & demonstration of CBM & Predictive Analytics for NAVSEA LCS shipboard maintenance and operational support. The primary goals were to demonstrate that in both a planning yard and shipboard environment a predictive analytic maintenance solution were achievable. Uninterruptible Power Supplies were selected for the predictive analytic demonstration due to the high failure rate as well as the abundance of maintenance information and historical data. GDMS provided PMS 505 & 505R with a Decision Support Analytics brief that provided an overview of the results of the CBM+ IRAD demonstration and its approach to Predictive Maintenance and Analytics LCS Logistics support.

    Based on feedback from PMS 505 leadership GDMS has proposed a pilot program on LCS 4 that builds upon the IRAD demonstration to more comprehensively and accurately demonstrate a CBM and Predictive Analytics/Health Monitoring (PAHM) implementation onboard LCS 4 in an extended, at sea environment with focus on the Sea Giraffe Radar, I/O devices, Servers and the Air Conditioning Plant.

    The project team will produce a report of predicted equipment failures during at sea testing, review the predicted accuracy for PAHM system and ROI achieved (notional maintenance cost savings during the test period), and review the impact to Ao based on installation and reporting PAHM systems.

    By focusing on the required analytic solutions to tap into the potential value of this CBM data in a timely manner, and enabling proactive CBM actions to be taken prior to failure, this project directly targets the issues that industry is facing in keeping pace with the mountain of collected data, and serves as a template process for addressing the challenges associated with supporting fielded assets.

    Objectives achieved through this NCMS/CTMA initiative will allow “Y Company” to show how predictive analytic technologies can be used in conjunction with existing sensors and instrumentation to provide advanced warning of major failures. The result will be a better maintained, more cost effective and better fuel efficiency for mechanized assets; therefore, contributing to a more capable warfighter.

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    CTMA Project Announcement: Removal of Magnetically Attached Devices (ReMAD) – Phase I

    Ground vehicles and equipment are very susceptible to unwanted magnetically attached devices (MADs) due to the large amount of mild steel used in their manufacture.

    New technologies need to be developed that address the issue of unwanted devices from being magnetically attached to vehicles, equipment, delivery trucks, construction equipment, taxis, limousines, building door entrances and other areas. Such unwanted devices could cause extensive property damage, enable unauthorized/forced entry, provide unwanted tracking/surveillance, or may deliver unwanted payloads resulting in human injury or death.

    Most of the research in understanding magnetism has been to increase or to control it. Very little has been done to counter or turn it off.

    In searching for a technology solution to address the issue of unwanted MADs, it is noted that overcoming the magnetostatic forces between the MAD and the mild steel does not require the magnet of the MAD to be saturated beyond its coercive field. An appropriately applied magnetic field (the disruptive field) with defined temporal and spatial properties in the vicinity of the attachment point will disrupt the magnetic interaction between the magnets used in the MAD and the mild steel causing the MAD to detach.

    On the basis of a successful first experiment, a full project description will be developed to rationalize the details of design, construction, testing, implementation and potential commercialization of the detachment system. A table top system will be designed and fabricated under this phase to further refine the computational models to be used to further develop the technology on a larger scale.

    Assuming Phase I successfully identifies and demonstrates through experimentation that a MAD detachment technology exists, it is expected the project will be able to move to the next phase (or phases) ultimately leading to multiple commercial applications.

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    Reducing No Fault Found and Improving Operational Availability through Intermittent Fault Detection and Isolation

    Author: Ken Anderson, Vice President, Universal Synaptics Corporation  

    For those in the avionics repair and maintenance business, the acronyms NFF (No Fault Found) and CND (Cannot Duplicate) are unfortunately, all too familiar terms. After several decades of frustration with this illusive phenomenon, it continues to consume an enormous amount of test and diagnostic effort and is the source of considerable cost and discomfort within the multi-level avionics repair model.

    In this article we will outline the problem of intermittence and its testing difficulties and more importantly, describe the unique equipment and process which has produced overwhelming success in Intermittence NFF resolution and MTBDR (Mean Time Between Depot Repair) extension for the U.S. Air Force.  Universal Synaptics Corporation working with Total Quality Systems, (TQS) Ogden, Utah, implemented a team-developed overhaul system called IFDIS (Intermittent Fault Detection and Isolation System) which incorporates all the necessary testing procedures and technological capabilities that are proving to be critical to the resolution of the chronic intermittent NFF problem.

     

    Introduction

    Today’s defense environment requires responsive and affordable solutions to global weapon system support challenges.  U.S. Forces are simultaneously engaged in multiple humanitarian assistance and disaster recovery operations while rebuilding a nation in Iraq, drawing-down major combat operations in Afghanistan, fighting terrorism around the globe, and maintaining a deterrent to strategic-level threats like cyber warfare and weapons of mass destruction.  However, as operations have increased, the DoD’s ability to economically sustain them has become increasingly challenging.  The high, sustained operations tempo over the past decade in harsh environments has eroded weapon system readiness and reduced expected life span.  In the current economic and political environment, recapitalization of systems has been complicated by sequestration and the cancellation of weapon systems modernization programs.  In light of these realities, the Services are seeking ways to improve maintenance capabilities, reduce NFF, and increase operational readiness while simultaneously reducing life-cycle costs.

    NFF test results in electronic boxes, primarily driven by intermittent faults, have become a significant concern and huge maintenance and life-cycle cost driver, and an operational readiness degrader within the DoD.  For many DoD weapon system electronic boxes driven to the depot for repair, less than half have the actual root cause of the problem identified and repaired.  The other half test NFF.  Unfortunately, conventional Automatic Test Equipment (ATE) was not designed to detect intermittent faults and is incapable of detecting and isolating momentary intermittent failures that cause NFF.  One of the reasons it is difficult for conventional ATE to detect intermittent faults is that circuits or functions are typically tested one at a time.  Unless the circuit with the intermittent defect happens to be tested at the very time the intermittent occurs, it is missed.  The undetected and unrepaired intermittent faults cause the electronic boxes to malfunction during operation, because these faults are not detected, and hence not repaired, at the depot.  Rather, the boxes continuously cycle between the field and depot consuming an enormous amount of resources, negatively impacting maintenance budgets, warfighter readiness and warfighter support.  Currently, NFF is a $2 billion dollar no-value added annual expense for the DoD.

    There are undoubtedly many causes of NFF and all of them should be addressed.  The question is: Where do we start and which solution will be the most beneficial?

    Our particular efforts have focused on the literal or statistical analysis of NFF, recognizing that if the system’s MTBDR has decreased, or if the device's NFF rate has increased with age and deterioration, a physical fault is most likely present.  If it isn’t found during conventional testing then it probably only fails intermittently.  Similarly, having an intermittent failure, in all probability cannot be detected or diagnosed at testing time because of known and demonstrated limitations in the conventional measurement equipment used to perform the tests.

     

    The Testing Problem

    Intermittence occurs randomly in time, place, amplitude and duration.  The very nature of this type of failure suggests that the ability to detect and further isolate the intermittence root cause is based on detection SENSITIVITY and PROBABILITY, rather than conventional methods concentrating on ohmic measurement accuracy. Simply put, you can’t detect an intermittent event until it occurs, and then you might have limited opportunities to catch it on the specific circuit when it does occur. Trying to measure fractions of a milliohm, scanning one circuit at a time, is ineffective for this particular failure mode.

    Through extensive hands-on failure analysis and repair of Rogue / Bad Actor / NFF avionics and other aging electronics, our research and practical application revealed that nearly all NFF failures are caused by underlying intermittence in the circuit path interconnections, not the electrical components. The electrical components generally fail “hard” and are, by comparison, easy to troubleshoot and repair. In contrast, the interconnecting devices mostly fail intermittently. These types of “devices” are defined as the connectors, crimps, splices, circuit board traces and solder joints, bulkhead connectors, backplanes, switches, circuit breakers, fuse receptacles, etc. In short, it is all the electromechanical devices that mechanically tie the circuit components together.

    Just like machinery, these particular devices wear gradually, or contamination builds-up over a period of time.  Rarely, unless damaged, will they be working perfectly one minute and the next become a repeatable, testable, hard failure.  Instead, the electromechanical devices go into a long and frustrating period of low-level intermittency as their mechanical tolerances change depending on their age, wear and the current operational environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, vibration and contamination exposure.

    When a particular circuit device’s electromechanical intermittence reaches sufficient magnitude, its overall electrical function begins to malfunction, resulting in increasing intermittent-type system failures, which when subsequently tested on the ground in a static environment, may perform sufficiently well as to avoid detection.

    It is important to note here that an intermittence of sufficient amplitude and duration to cause a system malfunction during extremes in the operating environment is likely to manifest itself at a much smaller amplitude and duration during ground-based testing, unless environmental stimulus is applied.  The amount of stimulus required to expose an intermittence is inversely proportional to the sensitivity of the testing equipment used to detect the intermittence.

    It’s at this point that NFFs circular logic and confusion begins. When a malfunction is reported but is no longer evident or easily detectable with conventional scanning test equipment, the maintenance specialist has only two expedient diagnostic choices: the intermittence is either in the aircraft or it is in the Line Replaceable Unit (LRU) / Weapon Replaceable Assembly (WRA). It’s unlikely that the pilot imagined or fabricated the original in-flight malfunction. Consequently, line technicians are often left to simply take a “shotgun” approach to the repair in an attempt to address the original write-up in a timely manner.  Unfortunately, by removing system elements prior to locating the root of the intermittence, the potential exists that the removal was not necessarily the problem.  Suggestions that the maintenance specialist simply pulled the wrong item due to inadequate training, tech orders, inexperience, etc., somewhat ignores the original reported malfunction from the weapon system operator and ensures that the defect remains undetected somewhere in the system.  If it positively is not in the LRU / WRA, then it’s more than likely still in the aircraft.

    Since intermittence occurs primarily in electromechanical devices, when the “most likely” opportunity is calculated, the LRU / WRA becomes the most prominent suspect.  There are hundreds and in many cases thousands of potential failure points in a typical avionics box, whereas the aircraft circuits and connections leading into the box may be just a few hundred.

    The Testing Solution

    Once intermittent failure modes are clearly understood, it becomes quite evident why the vast array of conventional test equipment cannot efficiently or effectively test for or isolate the root-cause of this elusive problem.

    In a typical avionics system, there are thousands of internal and external circuit paths moving electrons through thousands more physical interconnection points which are all aging to some degree, and will fail intermittently long before they fail permanently.  It only takes one of these devices reaching this condition to render the unit unreliable.  Since it is virtually impossible to manually probe such a system, and even if attempted, the probability that you would be measuring that specific path, at just the right moment, looking for the right signal, would be infinitesimal and futile.

    By any reasonable scientific explanation of the problem, to catch intermittents on the ground, you need to have phenomenal testing speed (sensitivity) and a 100% bandwidth.   In other words, the proper technology for the task must be able to test all of the failing system’s paths all of the time, in a simultaneous and continuous fashion.  Conventional test equipment does just the opposite.  Most testing devices employ digital sampling and averaging techniques to achieve higher levels of parametric accuracy, which will completely “average” a short-duration, ohmic, intermittent event right out of existence.  Likewise, virtually all continuity testing devices also employ scanning methodology and while they may be physically connected to each circuit, they still only measure one circuit at a time and then only briefly.  A continuity test ONLY verifies that the unit under test is wired correctly and is stable at that specific moment. These devices are typically limited to measurement speeds in the 100–200 millisecond range which add up to some rather massive holes in intermittence test coverage when testing just a single line and event detection is nearly impossible on all of the interconnections found in typical avionics systems.

    To address these testing limitations, the Intermittent Fault Detector (IFD) was developed specifically with intermittence requirements in mind.  It uses super sensitive analog detection technology on the front end and digital reporting and data processing technology on the backend, and it does it all in an efficient, parallel circuitry manner. The IFD consistently detects any intermittent circuit event on any circuit simultaneously, at ohmic glitch durations as short as 50 nanoseconds.  The numbers of simultaneous test points are scalable from 256 up to 20,000.

    What does this mean in the overall scope of intermittence detection probabilities?  It means everything!  It means success or failure, reliability or unreliability, integrity of a test or no integrity whatsoever.

    The Intermittent Fault Detection & Isolation System™ (IFDIS™) delivered to the 523rd EMXS at Hill AFB to test the

    F-16 AN/APG-68 Radar System PSP

    The Intermittent Fault Detection & Isolation System™ (IFDIS™) that will be delivered to the NAVAIR FRC SW  to test the F/A-18 GCU

    While certainly not comparing ourselves to Albert Einstein, his formula, E=MC2, which explained the force unleashed by the atomic bomb, is very similar to the probability gains derived from the IFD technology to catch random intermittents.  To explain and demonstrate this enhanced capability in a system of simultaneous circuit paths under test we use a similar formula that we affectionately, with respect to Mr. Einstein, call:

    Universal Synaptics’ Law of Intermittent Fault Detection Effectiveness:

    E=SC2

    In our formula, E is the Effectiveness that the IFD technology provides in detecting the most evasive of intermittent malfunctions (those causing NFF) in a given Unit Under Test (UUT) device versus any other comparable piece of test equipment (measured in a ratio:1).

    S is the single circuit intermittence detection Speed advantage that the IFD has over the single circuit intermittent detection speed capability of any comparable testing technology… for the IFD, use 50ns, 50 nanoseconds, .00000005 seconds.

    Simply stated, what is the ratio of the shortest glitch detectable by any two pieces of test equipment on just a single circuit?

    Example: 100us divided by 50ns = 2000:1 or 100ms divided by 50ns = 2,000,000:1

    C is the number of Circuits in the device that require simultaneous testing and this value is squared.

    Note:  The number one question that arises when explaining and using the Intermittent Fault Detection Probability formula is:

    “Why do you square the number of circuits to be tested ”(C)” in the comparison formula?

    Since this is the key to the entire solution, let’s take a moment to fully understand it.

    The reason the number of circuits under test is squared is that while every other single point or scanning-type testers are measuring one circuit at a time, the IFD is simultaneously testing all of the other circuits at the same time, for the same duration.  As the conventional scanning continuity tester moves on to test a new circuit, the IFD continues to test all the other connected circuits at the same time, for the same period.

    Intermittence by its very definition is random in time, place, amplitude and duration. Therefore, the detection of intermittence is a condition of probabilities and the ability to detect it is measured in test coverage.

    The following is a simple explanation of the squaring effect of simultaneous and continuous testing for intermittence (see Table 1)

    Using an easy example of a 3 by 3 matrix of circuits (9 total circuits to be tested,) like a simple 9 pin cable, let’s compare.  Conventional scanning test equipment, while physically connected to all the circuits, still only measures one circuit at a time. While this technology might measure test point 1 for one second, the IFD’s all-lines, all-the-time technology, simultaneously and continuously tests all 9 of the circuits for that same one second, for 9 total seconds of intermittence test coverage. When conventional equipment then moves (scans) to measure test point 2, also for one second, the IFD tests all 9 circuits for another second, giving you 9 more seconds of intermittence test coverage. Conventional equipment then moves on to test point 3 for one second, and the IFD again tests all 9 circuits for that same one second.  When conventional testers have finally completed testing each of the 9 circuits for the one second each (9 seconds total), the IFD has just simultaneously tested all 9 circuits for 9 seconds each, (9 x 9) or 81 total seconds.

     

    Table 1

     

     

    Test Points

    Duration

    of Tests

    Conventional Scanning

    Test Coverage

    IFD All-Lines

    Test Coverage

    1 1s 1 Second 9 Seconds
    2 1s 1 Second 9 Seconds
    3 thru 8 1s 6 Seconds 54 Seconds
    9 1s 1 Second 9 Seconds
    Total Coverage  

    9s

     

    9 Seconds

     

    81 Seconds

     

    It doesn’t matter if you have a 9 pin cable or a 10,000 test point avionics box, with the IFD’s simultaneous and continuous test technology; you effectively square the number of circuits in total test coverage.

    In fact, the IFD’s test coverage is actually even better than this.  Scanning continuity testers take valuable test time to switch to the next circuit and in order to see ohmic glitches (rather than complete opens); they must also charge the new line sufficiently to see an ohmic change.  Meanwhile, the IFD dutifully keeps watch for ohmic events on any line for the entire duration.

     

    Result:

    Using this simple-to-calculate formula (E=SC2) for test coverage or probability gain of the IFD technology, you can begin to see why the IFD works and other technologies simply don’t.

    For example, consider a state-of-the-art, scanning continuity tester that claims to test continuity at the rate of 3,500 test points a minute.  The single-circuit intermittent discontinuity detection speed could then be computed to be approximately 17ms (.017 seconds) (60/3500).

    If you were testing just one wire or circuit, then the IFD at 50ns (nanoseconds) calculates to be 340,000 times more sensitive at catching intermittence on a single circuit.

    S= .017 divided by .00000005 = 340,000 times more likely to detect NFF intermittence on a single circuit.

    Now, take a 100-circuit chassis or cable.

    Using the formula E=SC2:

    E = 340,000 x 100 x 100 = 3,400,000,000

    In this example, the IFD is 3.4 billion times more sensitive than the scanning continuity tester for detecting intermittent/NFF at 50ns on a 100 circuit chassis or cable.

    Next, take a 1,000 test point coverage requirement, such as the (MLPRF) Modular Low Power Radio Frequency LRU chassis in the AN/APG-68 radar used on the F-16 Fighting Falcon:

    Using E=SC2:

    E = 340,000 x 1,000 x 1,000 = 340,000,000,000

    In this example, the IFD is 340 billion times more sensitive than the scanning continuity tester for detecting intermittent/NFF at 50ns on a 1,000 circuit chassis or cable.

    Similarly, take a 3,000 test point coverage requirement, such as the Radar Receiver (RR) WRA chassis in the AN/APG-73 Radar used on the F/A-18 Hornet:

    Using E=SC2:

    E = 340,000 x 3,000 x 3,000 = 3,060,000,000,000

    In this example, the IFD is 3 trillion, 60 billion times more sensitive than the scanning continuity tester for detecting intermittent / NFF at 50ns on a 3,000-circuit chassis.

    The demonstrated advantages in detection probability are why IFD technology is actively reducing the intermittent / NFF problem down to a 5 minute test in a typical avionics system as outlined above.  The simple to compute metrics also show conclusively why IFD technology works so well for resolving the intermittent / NFF problem.  This technology sees real intermittent circuit occurrences that conventional test equipment cannot see and was not designed to detect.  Given this “explosion” in test coverage, it becomes crystal clear why the IFD is the only applicable technology designed specifically for, and capable of, detecting, resolving, and gauging the overall problem and levels of intermittent/NFF.

    The U.S. Air Forces use of and understanding of the intermittent / NFF problem has allowed them to achieve unprecedented results in a very short time.  The IFDIS is being utilized on the F-16 radar system (60% of the LRUs tested has one or more intermittent circuit that conventional test equipment missed).  The IFDIS has provided a more than tripling of the MTBDR, reduced squadron re-work by 50% and returned to service over $42 million dollars’ worth of critical flight hardware previously considered “unrepairable”.   All in, the U.S. Air Force has achieved an 28 times return on investment (ROI) to date.

    With a whopping 72% of all Navy and Marine Corp maintenance actions being avionics related, one must ask what portion of that is NFF and CND and how much intermittence is being missed by conventional test equipment?

     

    IFDIS is the Cure for Intermittent / NFF

    IFDIS Intermittent Fault Detection and Isolation Systems can best be described as a 3-pillared approach to resolving intermittent / NFF.

    These pillars consist of;

    1. The implementation and use of serialized data tracking to identify bad actors and repeat offender problems by aircraft and LRUs / WRAs.
    2. The application of light environmental stimuli to duplicate the operational environment and rapidly expose even the "lowest amplitude and shortest duration" intermittent circuits during test time.
    3. The use of precise intermittence testing technology. Intermittent Fault Detectors (IFDs) developed by Universal Synaptics Corp. are specifically designed to detect and isolate the underlying intermittent causes at levels of sensitivity and probability never before possible, as well as form and fit Interface Test Adaptation (ITA) to ensure that all of the potential failing circuit interconnects in the suspect devices are all tested simultaneously and continuously while closely simulating the aircrafts operational environment.
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    Maintenance Innovation Challenge Finalists Announced

    The Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) principals have reviewed and scored the 70 abstract and quad chart submittals for the 2015 Maintenance Innovation Challenge competition. Congratulations to the following 6 finalists that have been selected to present at the Maintenance Innovation Challenge on Monday, 7 December from 3:00-4:30 pm:

    • Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing for Increased Accuracy and Repeatability
      LT Christopher G. MacLean, Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and IMF
    • Using Voice Directed Technology for Transforming Maintenance & Inspection Ops
      Prakash Somasundaram, Honeywell
    • Assembled Replacement Integrated Circuits (ARICs)
      Corey Kopp, NUWC Keyport
    • USCG Aviation Bonded Material Inspection System
      Rusty G. Waldrop, U.S. Coast Guard
    • Automated Debris Analysis for At-line Maintainers
      Steve Odom, GasTOPS Inc
    • NOKOMIS Advanced Detection of Electronic Counterfeits (ADEC)
      Bryan J. Neva, NAVAIR Advanced Aircraft Technologies IPT

    The six finalists’ submissions will be ranked and scored by DoD’s most senior maintenance and sustainment leaders and an overall winner will be selected and announced during the plenary at the 2015 DoD Maintenance Symposium on December 8, 2015. The innovative submissions not selected as finalists will be highlighted in the 2015 Maintenance Innovation Challenge Book. Thank you for your participation. Please visit the website below for the latest event details.

    http://www.sae.org/events/dod/

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    Information and Nomination Procedures for the 2015 Industry Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award

    The Industry Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award - 2015

    Since 1995, the National Center for Advanced Technologies (NCAT), acting as the agent for the Associations and Societies involved in the Multi-Association Industry Affordability Task Force, has sought to recognize an individual and small working groups/teams in the defense manufacturing community for making outstanding contributions to furthering manufacturing science and technology in the United States for the past fiscal year (Oct 2014 - Sep 2015). Through the Industry Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award, these Associations and Professional Societies acknowledge and recognize contributions of those scientists, designers, engineers, and/or managers involved in defense manufacturing who have sought to:
    (1) Conduct research into ways and means to increase the producibility, affordability, or technical superiority of the nation’s defense systems and/or
    (2) Develop or practice ways and means to increase the producibility, affordability, or technical superiority of the nation’s defense systems.

    Associations and Societies solicit nominations for the Award from its members and then forward the nominations to NCAT. Companies may also submit nominations directly to the NCAT award coordinator. Each year, a lead Association or Society acts as the main sponsor for the Award, which is also endorsed by all the other Associations and Societies affiliated with the Multi-Association Industry Affordability Task Force (the logos of all the affiliated societies ands associations appear on the Award plaque). The President of the lead association presents the Award at the Annual Defense Manufacturing Conference, scheduled for December 1, 2015, with high-level Industry and Government officials in attendance. For the year 2015 the National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA) is leading the Award, which will be made in the name of all of the affiliated Associations and Societies.

    Since 1999 awards have been made in two categories: Individual and Small Team/Group. Since 2002 three categories have been awarded: Individual, Small Team/Group (Large Business), and Small Team/Group (Small Business). These three categories shall continue to be used for the 2015 awards. Note: Small business is defined as a firm with less than 500 total employees.

    Award Eligibility

    The award is open to all. Nominees (as many as desired) may be submitted by all the affiliated Associations/Societies of the Multi-Association Industry Affordability Task Force in any or all of the three award categories: individual, small team/group (large business), and small team/group (small business). Although companies are strongly encouraged to (and usually do) submit nominations through one of the Associations, occasionally nominations from one of the companies represented on the Multi-Association Industry Affordability Task Force will be sent to NCAT directly. These are considered valid nominations, but will be attributed to the most applicable association to be considered for the award. Each Association is limited to three nominations in each of the three categories, and each association is responsible for submitting at least one nomination, including all categories.

    Note: Joint Industry/Government teams are eligible. There are no restrictions on who can be nominated for the Individual award category—both Government and Industry individuals have won this award, often with a record of service in both regimes.

    The nominees must be living at the time of their nomination. Any individual or small group/team in the defense manufacturing community that has significantly contributed to the understanding, development, or application of manufacturing techniques, processes, methods, practices, or management throughout the nation is eligible for this award.

    • Individual category nominations may be either for (1) a specific achievement in defense manufacturing which culminated during the past year or (2) a sustained record of performance and distinguished contributions in the defense manufacturing arena over a longer period.
    • Small team/group from large (over 500 employees) companies should be for a specific achievement in the field of defense manufacturing which culminated during the past year. Award is limited to 10 team members.
    • Small team/group from small business (less that 500 employees) companies should be for a specific achievement in the field of defense manufacturing which culminated during the past year. The small business should have performed the majority of the work. Award is limited to 10 team members

    2015 Nominating and Award Selection Procedures

    Nominations should be provided electronically and include the following information:

    1. Nominator’s name, mailing address, and electronic communications contact information (phone, fax, and e-mail)
    2. Nominator’s title and organization/affiliation (company or association)
    3. Nominee’s name and title, institutional or company affiliation, and address. For team categories please include the name of the project here.
    4. Category: Specify whether the nomination is for the individual or one of the small team/group categories (large or small business). If for the team/group categories, all of the members’ names should be included as nominees (exactly as they would appear in the Award Program, should the team/group be selected).
    5. A summary of the action(s): the basis for the nomination (approximately 100-150 words). This will form the basis for the “citation” to be published in the Award program distributed at the presentation ceremony should the nominee win. Hint: It also “grabs” the attention of the members of the Award Committee who will be evaluating the nomination.
    6. A separate longer statement, not to exceed three, single spaced pages (12 point “Times New Roman” or similar font preferred), with one inch margins. This will form the basis for the comparative evaluation by the Award Committee of the award nominees and selection of the award recipient(s).
      Nomination details should include:

      • Technical/managerial challenges overcome
      • Significance of the accomplishment
      • Financial or technical performance benefits (should be as specific as possible, without the use of any proprietary data. In needed, use normalized data.)
      • Potential for solution to be subsequently applied beyond the original applications.
    7. A resume of the nominee or a brief biography for each nominee. In the case of the team award (optional), a brief description of the key team members and a biography/resume for the team leader(s) are appropriate.

    Completed nominations should be submitted to the Awards Coordinator, The National Center for Advanced Technologies, e-mail mark.gordon@ncat.com, phone 813-899-4545, Fax 813-425-7774. Questions regarding nomination procedures or other matters may also be addressed using this contact information.

    The deadline for award nomination submissions is COB, Friday, November 6, 2015. All nominating materials may be used by NCAT to publicize the award.

    As stated previously, NDIA is the lead association for the 2015 award selection process and will present the award at DMC 2015 on Tuesday, December 2, 2014. Mr. Ralph Resnick, Chair of the NDIA Manufacturing Division will chair the 2015 Industry Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award Selection Committee. Past lead associations/societies have included: NSIA (1995), AIA (1996, 2000, 2010), GEIA (1997, 2005), AMT (1998, 2007, 2013), AFCEA (1999), SME (2001, 2008, 2014), NACFAM (2002, 2009), NDIA (2006), NCMS (2004, 2011), and NCDMM (2012).

    Award Nomination and Selection Process

    NCAT forms the Award Selection Committee each year from representatives of the affiliated Associations and Societies. The Associations and Societies solicit nominees from their member companies and then forward their nominations to NCAT by the Nomination due date. NCAT in turn consolidates and forwards copies of each of the nomination packages to each member of the Award Selection Committee. The members of the Award Committee then individually evaluate and rank order all of the nominees in each of the three award categories and forward their three sets of rank orders to NCAT. NCAT then tallies the votes. In each of the three categories the entry with the most first-place votes is the winner. If there is a tie for number of first place votes, it will be resolved using the rank ordering (number of second place votes; if that does not resolve the tie, number of third place votes, etc.). The Committee then ratify the NCAT tally (one ratification vote per Association/Society present) and approve the selection of the winner(s) in the three categories of the Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award.

    Award Ceremony

    The Awards will be presented at the Defense Manufacturing Conference (Phoenix, AZ, Nov. 30 – Dec 3, 2015). The recipients of the Award(s) will be notified in advance so they can arrange to attend the awards presentation ceremony at DMC and receive their awards in person if they desire. Also, the winners usually will be asked to provide a picture of the winning individual/groups for inclusion in the Awards Program. Note: All award recipients have in fact chosen to receive their awards in person, although sometimes not all members of the winning team have been able to attend.

    Past Award Recipients

    2013
    - Dr. Michael McGrath
    - L3 Common Data Link team

    2013
    - Mr. Lance Bryant
    - RRMIF: Automated Missile Factory

    2012
    - Mr. Ed Morris
    - MLRS Rocket Motor: Air Pollution Control System

    2011
    - Mr. Steven M. Linder
    - Zinc Sulfide Missile Dome
    - Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools

    2009
    - Mr. Donald H. Verhoff
    - Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools Team
    - Tantalum-Tungsten Lined Gun Barrel Manufacturing Team
    - M-ATV Production Launch Team

    2008
    - DHUD Reflective Microdisplay Team
    - Naval Propulsion Shaft Machining Team

    2007
    - Mr. Jim Mattice
    - Common Composite Tailcone
    - Kinetic Spray Metal Deposition Technologies
    2006
    - Dr. Jacques Gansler
    - Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle
    - Enhanced Wiring Integrity Team

    2005
    - Mr. Thomas D. “Dan” Cundiff
    - Rapid Prototyping Technology Advancement Team

    2004
    - Mr. Larry Rhoades, Extrude Hone
    - Metals Affordability Initiative
    - The Light Armored Vehicle Logistics Support Team

    2003
    - Mr. Leonard Martinez, Sandia National Laboratories
    - Paveway Integrated Supply Chain Team, Raytheon
    - ManTech Laser Shock Peening Initiative, LSI, Inc

    2002
    - Mr. Richard Engwall
    - Laser Engineered Net Shaping
    (LENS) NCMS/CTMA Team
    - High Throughput Production Process (HITHRU) NCMS/CTMA Team
    - Objective Individual Combat Weapon (OICW) ATK Team
    - Sandoff Land Attack Missile-Expanded Response (SLAM-ER) Lean Pathways Team

    2001
    - Mr. Robert Cattoi
    - Lockheed Martin Aeronautics JSF Airframe Affordability Demonstration Team
    - Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Project Lightspeed Team

    2000
    - Mr. James M. Sinnett
    - The Boeing JDAM Production and SMEI Teams

    1999
    - Dr. Lance Davis
    - Harris GCSD Team

    1998
    - Mr. Herman M. Reininga

    1997
    - Mr. Aris Melissaratos

    1996
    - Mr. William James Andahazy

    1995
    - Mr. R. Noel Longuemare

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    NAVAIR Seeks Pinless Connector Applications: Updated

    The Navy and Marine Corps have found aircraft wiring issues to be among the top contributors of aircraft performance degradation and downtime. There are many false removals of avionic systems due to faulty wires and degraded connectors, up to 80-90% in some cases. Frequent removal and reinstallation of avionics can cause the aircraft connectors to encounter problems with bent pins, pushed pins, or corroded pins. Connectors also can become contaminated with sand, water, or salt. Removal, replacement, and repair of these connectors is a drain on resources, is time-consuming and contributes to lowering aircraft operational availability. Additionally, some cables and connectors are embedded deep in an aircraft and cannot be accessed without major aircraft downtime.

    To address the connector issue, the Integrated Diagnostics and Automated Test Systems (IDATS) Team from the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, in Lakehurst, NJ, has developed a connector that requires no pins in order to transmit data. The current prototype is estimated to be between Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 3 and TRL 4.


    Figure 1. Pinless Connector Prototype

    This patent-pending system uses small infrared transceivers to send and receive data. The current prototype, seen in Figure 1, is built to transmit and receive three channels of the ARINC 429 data bus protocol at both 12.5 kilobits-per-second (Kbps) and 100 Kbps. Communication is full duplex and simultaneous across all three channels using an infrared link. The transceivers have been integrated with a microcontroller. All of this has been miniaturized to fit inside a MIL-SPEC connector. Figure 2 is an illustration of the current system. This system replaces 12 connector pins.


    Figure 2. Pinless Connector Major Components.

    The IDATS Team is seeking partners would like to further develop applications for this pinless connector technology. The team believes there are many applications both in the commercial and military world that could benefit from pinless connectors. For example, industries such as automotive, aerospace, heavy construction and military ground vehicles that operate in harsh environments over extended periods requiring frequent component removals and potential damage to connectors would see an immediate improvement in cost and downtime. A variety of licensing or cooperative research opportunities are available to develop this technology for a variety of requirements in several potential industries. Future applications may include extending this technology to higher-speed data buses, such as Ethernet and MIL-STD-1553. A demonstration video of the current prototype is available upon request. Please send all inquiries to the IDATS Lead Systems Engineer, Dr. Russell Shannon at russell.shannon@navy.mil, or 732-323-4538.

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    Integrated Global Information Successes

    The industry and Department of Defense (DoD) are both migrating away from "stovepiped" logistics information systems to adequately perform their supply and maintenance functions and are moving toward integrated global information architectures where multiple users can create and exploit authoritative information for their logistics function.   The Marine Corps has done this through the implementation of Global Combat Service Support Marine Corps or GCSS-MC. As industry and DoD modernize the logistics information architectures it has been clearly evident that during the post-deployment phase of these systems a gap has arisen between the users knowledge specific to their functional business processes and proper utilization of the system.  To address these implementation gaps Anglicotech, NCMS through initiatives in the CTMA program, and the Marine Corps have developed and are currently maturing various organizational change management procedures to derive best practice solutions for implementation of an Enterprise Resource Planning tool (ERP).  The team has found solutions to these knowledge, procedural and training gaps and is creating well-trained, technically adept, and forward-thinking Marine logisticians that can fully utilize the latest ERP.

    One of the keys to the successful implementation of an ERP involves the training and education of the end users. Anglicotech teams have developed training packages executed in a classroom environment and over the shoulder in units throughout the Marine Corps. This level of effort, sometimes extending down to one-on-one sessions with Marines, has led to an improved level of understanding and the continual progression in the skills and expertise of the Marines in relation to the ERP. A cornerstone of the training is the curriculum that identifies the proper processes and procedures utilized in the system.  The Anglicotech team has been involved with the curriculum for every class within the catalog of courses for GCSS-MC and continues to develop new techniques that address the capabilities of the ERP and better ways for the Marines to utilize it.

    To date 5,096 Marines have been provided training and assistance through classroom instruction or a team-assist visit to the Marine Unit. Each unit-assist visit analyzed records, processes and procedures, and system utilization. More importantly, the teams provided training and technical expertise, as well as documents and tools for the units to use after the teams departed. As practicable, the teams would revisit the units four to six weeks after the initial assist visit to see how the unit was doing and provide additional help as needed. The assist visits allow the Marines to be fully immersed in GCSS-MC, performing real-world transactions, all while having a duty expert there to provide insight and training.  These real-world scenarios provide greater system understanding and increased knowledge retention.

    During these assist visits the teams have corrected millions of dollars in records discrepancies, implemented proper asset utilization procedures, and provided proper alignment of resources within GCSS-MC. These automated tools and reports have been adopted across the Corps and continue to provide technical examples, details for unit set ups and alignment, identification and correction procedures of discrepancies and utilization of the ERP that increase readiness and make the units more efficient and effective.

    This global collaborative initiative has benefitted the Marine Corps as they implemented an ERP supporting hundreds of thousands of people spread across hundreds of locations around the globe.  This enables industry to have greater insight into the issues resulting from transitioning to a modern global logistics information systems from legacy “stovepipe” information systems. These efforts can then be translated into actions that can be utilized at various levels throughout industry and the DoD.

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    NCMS' RARE Parts Team Delivers!

    A recent Rapid Access to Readiness-Essential (RARE) Parts Team collaboration resulted in a successful outcome for TRF Kings Bay. In early July, Craig Hoskins, Materials Engineer, Trident Refit Facility, Kings Bay contacted Connie Philips, NCMS Sr. Program Manager and lead of the RARE Parts Team.  Craig communicated their difficulty obtaining a nickel-aluminum bronze cast part for the Ohio Class submarine that is no longer available for purchase. With these part experiencing general corrosion, galvanic corrosion, and micro-cracking continued weld repairs became unfeasible.  TRF prepared to “hog” out the part using traditional machining from solid wrought material to meet their urgent need, a very costly and time consuming solution.  Craig turned again to the NCMS RARE Parts Team for a longer term solution knowing that this MIL-B-24480 alloy is difficult to successfully pour and weld repair.

    NCMS immediately sent an email alert to all RARE team members along with pictures, drawing, and specification requirements provided by TRF. Within a brief two week period, Bryce Weber, Mechanical Engineer at NUWC Keyport (RARE team member) reported that the same cast parts had been produced from molds and cores printed using their ProMetal S15 sand printer for Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard’s Los Angeles boats.  Two days later, Kyle Morris, P.E. Mechanical Engineer at NUWC Keyport, sent confirmation of part conformance to the Ohio Class drawing with a cost and 4 month delivery quote of ‘A’ certified finished castings to TRF Kings Bay.

    NCMS, through the RARE Parts Team network, provided an additive manufacturing solution delivering parts at a projected lower cost in less time compared to traditional manufacturing methods.  To learn more about the NCMS RARE Parts Team, please contact Debbie Lilu debral@ncms.org

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    CTMA Partners Meeting Recap

    NCMS_CTMApartnersmeeting_2015

     

    2015 CTMA Partners Meeting Recap

    NCMS concluded its 2015 Annual CTMA Partners Meeting last week at our facility in Ann Arbor, MI. Thank you to all who took time to join us in person, and to those who logged into the virtual conference.  Our members and government guests enjoyed the tremendous opportunity to meet with numerous industry and academia personnel who were available for the networking reception each evening.  We strive to discuss all your maintenance issues and possible solutions while providing technology displays addressing the current needs within the Maintenance and Sustainment community.

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    AIMS installed by U.S. Marine Corp; Instant Results

    Conducting a Proof of Principle, the U.S. Marine Corps installed four armories with Asset Information Management Solutions (AIMS) Automated Armory™. Instantly time savings were realized as processes that took over 34 hours were reduced to as little as 1 hour. Tracking with a simple single click of a mouse, no longer flipping through paper on a clipboard or in a drawer, gave users confidence of knowing exactly where assets were at any given time. Replacing paper log books immediately provided compliance of even often-violated rules and instructions that gave command visibility and assurance tasks were getting done and correctly.

    AIMS enhances the visibility across the life cycle of any item(s) desired to be tracked. Providing an enterprise available connection and visibility of the AIMS modules to each other and also external data sources, AIMS is a complete asset and personnel management solution with a semantically-enabled data exchange capability.

    AIMS consists of a core provider with a vast selection of modules that are built and managed around the effective user-friendly interfaces. This gives the suite of technology to be focused on – what functions you need! Whether you are in an office, a warehouse, on a dock, on the road, in the field, or around the world, the modules easily fit where you need them.

    AIMS Automated Armory™ is an issue and inventory solution that accommodates the issue, reporting, recover, receipt, and maintenance processes for serialized and non-serialized small arms, optics, ammo, and ordnance equipment providing the highest level of standards in accountability.  With incorporated technology - e.g. Identification card, Item Unique Identification (IUID), Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), Digital Signature, and Biometrics - AIMS Automated Armory™ ensures accurate and rapid identification of items and authentication of personnel.

    AIMS Automated Armory™ is a scalable solution that is configured to the specific needs and requirements of the user, location, and business rules. Designed to operate in a connected or disconnected environment allows it to be a fully deployable solution.

    AIMS Cloud:

    • Provides a browser-based management of the items and AIMS modules.
    • Used to keep everything and everybody in sync.

    AIMS Modules:

    Automated Armory - serialized and non-serialized small arms, optics, ammo, and ordnance equipment.
    Tool Room Manager - serialized and non-serialized tools and consumables.
    Motor Pool Manager - serialized vehicles issue, recover, and inspection.
    Document Manager - centralized document management system.
    Initial Planning Tool - requirements gathering, sharing, and compiling.
    HZMT Tracker - non-serialized materials and consumables requiring special use and handling.
    Vault Manager - serialized and non-serialized high security items, often where children are as important.
    Production Line Manager - serialized and non-serialized equipment use and availability.
    IT Management - serialized, non-serialized, and license tracking and usage.
    AIMS Connect - ability to connect and sync external applications.
    Warranty Manager - serialized tracking of warranty items.
    Container Visibility Tool - serialized and non-serialized availability and location.
    Pick Pack Ship - warehouse tracking.
    myRegistry - serialized and non-serialized recording of items.
    Resource Exchange - serialized and non-serialized ability to expose and share items.
    Certificate Manager - calibration or other certificate tracking on assets.
    Parts Manager - serialized and non-serialized parts bin tracking.

    For additional information please contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

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    CTMA Recently Completed Projects

    2D/3D Data Model Collaboration Between FRC Southwest, FRC East & FRC Southeast

    The project focused on allowing resources from other FRC locations to participate in any portion of the Manufacturing Model Management System process via remote access to FRC Southwest’s PLM environment to prove the “One FRC” concept promoted by COMFRC. Capabilities to search and share data enhanced maintenance and logistics processes.

     

    Collective Mind:  Avoidance of Maintenance Cost through Predictive Trending

    The Collective Mind initiative was launched to demonstrate the value of “Big Data” analytics in a maintenance environment. Big data analytic system algorithms are optimized for rapidly scanning and processing data systems to notify maintenance and supply managers about emergence of possible significant problems substantially earlier.  The project began to explore the hypotheses and accomplished its limited objective.

     

    ZeroG® Arm Technology Transfer to DoD Depots to Reduce Injuries and Reduce the Cost of Maintenance

    This project conducted a productivity assessment to evaluate the benefits of applying zeroG® technology to assist depot workers as they used a variety of tooling (e.g. sanders, drills, grinders, etc.) that require periods of prolonged use. The assessment reviewed both quantitative measures and qualitative measures of productivity (worker fatigue, ergonomics, etc.). Designed to carry the weight of heavy tools, zeroG® allows the completion of arduous tasks with a higher degree of quality while eliminating most of the physical stress and fatigue experienced by the workforce.

     

    Maintenance and Supply Accountability and Process Efficiencies – Marine Corps User Experience and System Operational Improvement for GCSS-MC

    The goal of this project was to assist the Operational Advisory Group (OAG) in identifying areas of concern, creating a way ahead, and devising improvements upon the systems, processes and procedures associated with Global Combat Service Support Marine Corps (GCSS-MC) as identified by HQMC to include but not exclusive to combat service support operations in CONUS and deployed environments. The actions of the project included the identification of technology, training, processes, policy and skill sets needed to increase effectiveness and efficiency in the Marine Corps Maintenance and Supply Operations.

     

    Advanced Mobile Electrical Fault Detection and Isolation Tester (AMEFDIT) for All Aircraft Subsystems

    The purpose of the initiative was to evaluate the new electrical wiring tester, AMUET, developed by a Canadian company, Solavitek, on two selected electrical subsystems on the C-130 at Warner Robins ALC. While the project budget imposed some limitations on the scope of work, the overall results demonstrated that AMUET was a very agile platform to configure and operate. AMUET capabilities were demonstrated on two subsystems on the C-130 (engine instrument and anti-skid braking). Objectives for set-up and operational performance in the D-Level and potentially for the O-Level testing were met.

     

    MARFORRES Material Readiness Analysis and Logistics Information Management

    The focus of the effort was to improve the Marine Forces Reserve inventory accuracy including data entry along with providing greater visibility of inventory status and readiness throughout the Forces. A new tool was developed to track, evaluate and analyze ground equipment and personnel data. While training was ongoing, the dashboard tool was developed with seven of the 11 readiness metrics, refined and tested in collaboration with Marine Forces Reserve G-4 and G-8 Information Management/Knowledge Management.

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    CTMA Connector February 2015

    View emailed newsletter

    CTMA Emerging Projects

    Enhanced Environmental Performance for Transparent Armor

    During vehicle transport and convoy driving, transparent armor is subject to damage from rock strikes. Once chipped, the armor becomes susceptible to cracking. Furthermore, high interlaminar residual stresses and thermal cycling stresses cause delamination of the armor layers. As a result, transparent armor is weakened, soldier threat is increased, driver vision is obscured, service life is reduced, and sustainment costs are increased before the vehicle ever reaches its mission objective. In fact, an Army study determined that rock-strike damage accounted for 32% of the replacement cost of transparent armor. This project focuses on developing bulk materials and coatings for alternative transparent armor strike face, sacrificial strike ply, interlayer material, glass film technology, and transparent armor process parameters to provide improved resistance to rock strike and delamination. To prolong the service life of transparent armor further, this project will investigate the possibility of field repair procedures for cracked and chipped glass.

    Companies interested in participating in this project should contact:

    Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org (734) 995-4930 for more information.

    Test Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment (TMDE) Initiative – Phase II

    Maintenance and sustainment support efforts in commercial industries are heavily reliant on Test Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment (TMDE). A combination of tools and test equipment is used. Double and triple redundant TMDE systems are often in place generating more costly manufacturing processes and inefficiencies. The key enabler for improving TMDE systems within the Marine Corps is their Electronic Maintenance Support System (EMSS).

    The Phase II objective is to assess EMSS’s capabilities and limitations, to identify emerging commercial technologies to address/improve EMSS, to understand the potential benefits/risks to EMSS capability requirements, to identify cost impacts over time, and to collaboratively develop an implementation plan for the marines and commercial industry to consider.

    Within Phase II of this project, the CMTA team will perform systems requirements analysis and development of cost informed implementation strategies. Secondly, the team will work in close concert with the core stakeholders and subject matter experts to evaluate the impact of formal Requirements (JCIDS and Marine Corps Force Development processes and systems), as well as enterprise and systems architectures describing the systems, processes and standards required to implement any recommended solutions within the Marine networks.

    The results of this analysis will be extrapolated to support broader industry, public, and DoD applications. By using qualitative and quantitative tools the analysis will be repeatable and testable. The public will benefit when industry’s lifecycle cost reduction translates into reduced prices for goods and services.

    Companies interested in participating in this project should contact:

    Bill Chenevert, (734) 995-7989, billc@ncms.org

    U.S. Marine Corps Condition-Based Maintenance (CBM+) Enterprise Implementation Initiative – Phase II

    Due to the successes of the initial efforts of the CBM+ Enterprise Implementation Initiative – Phase I project through CTMA, the U.S. Marine Corps has decided to further investigate two areas that were identified as a result of the initial analysis – namely, Enhanced Inventory Control and Field Oil Condition Monitoring. Due to this, the Marine Corps has requested to expand and extend the CBM+ analyses within a second Phase to the project to add deep-dives into these particular initiatives.

    Through a Marine Corps standardized approach to maintenance, the specifically CBM+, industry will benefit by means of having a defined set of interfaces for each program instead of a loose set of requirements for delivering CBM+ solutions on each product. The public will benefit when industry’s operations cost reduction translates into reduced prices for goods and services. Additionally, industry will also have a single process approach and data formats for development and delivery of support packages to the Marine Corps, other DoD activities, and other industry partners. Reduced costs and maintenance requirements for industry and the public sector is linked directly to improvement equipment readiness.

    Companies interested in participating in this project should contact:

    Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    Call for Technologies

    Anniston Army Depot Looking for Industry Partners

    Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) has identified three technology needs and are looking for industry partners with solutions that may address those needs. The three focus areas in need of attention are:

    1. Flexible Work Positioning Equipment

    2. Optimized Removal Process for Paints, Coatings, Rust, and Lubricants

    3. Cadmium Exposure Controls

    Descriptions of the ANAD problem areas are provided below. If you are interested in learning more about the specifics of each, please contact: Bill Chenevert (billc@ncms.org) or Steve Hale (steveh@ncms.org). Arrangements will be made to talk directly to Anniston technology insertion personnel to get further clarification on their needs. This should allow you the opportunity to provide a more formal reply with technology proposals that may satisfy ANAD’s needs. This is great opportunity to engage directly with DoD maintenance personnel to solve a real problem and becoming a member of a potential CTMA project funded by Anniston.

    Please indicate your interest along with some background of your company to either Bill Chenevert billc@ncms.org or Steve Hale steveh@ncms.org no later than February 27.

    Technology Need 1. Flexible Work Positioning Equipment

    Background:

    Large vehicle structures, e.g. Vehicle Hulls, are loaded into positioning stands for structural repair (primarily welding). Positioning the structure properly for welding, machining or assembly improves quality of work and minimizes ergonomic issues e.g. stress and strain related to working at elevated heights.

    Challenges:

    1. Current work position stands/fixtures are dedicated or configured specifically for a particular vehicle, causing scheduling issues when the mix of work does not fit the set-up of the stands.

    2. Most stands do not have powered vertical height control. Being able to raise or lower the position of the work once it is rotated to the desired position would minimize issues related to worker fall protection and would better accommodate the work to be performed.

    3. Currently, there are no positioning stands supporting turret work, only hull. The depot had a turret position stand in the past, but it was so difficult to use that it was seldom used.

    4. Flexible position stands incorporating multiple stations would accommodate other work operations such as repair of scissor bridge repair, paint, installation of composite spall liner and other operations.

    Technology Need 2. Optimized Removal Process for Paints, Coatings, Rust, and Lubricants

    Background:

    Hulls and Turrets loaded into the spinner hangars (wheel-abraders) that use stainless steel cut wire. Process time for component to be stripped is just short of an hour. Once “first” cut is completed, the component is transferred to “walk-in” booths for “second” cut. Process time for second cut is 5-6 hours, manual blast with garnet (Garnet is a sandblasting mineral, derived from either Almandite or Andradite deposits).

    Challenges:

    1. The spinner hangars are maintenance nightmares (dust collectors, maintaining seals on doors, wheels, reclamation equipment). We’ve experienced numerous “findings” with financial penalties, by ADEM (state EPA) for blast media (and other) not properly contained within the equipment operating “window”. Simply stated; dry media blast machines begin to eat themselves the minute you switch them on.

    2. The mil standard prohibits the use of ferrous based blast media on non-ferrous based substrates. That would mean that all M9 ACE hulls, all 113 hulls, all M109 Howitzer cabs (and etc.), fabricated from aluminum armor, be blasted only with Garnet. That would be a two day cycle at least. Motors that drive the wheels of the wheel-abrader are variable frequency controlled; impingement energy required to remove coatings is a combination of momentum (how hard I’m throwing the blast media), grit size and shape, and hardness of material.

    3. Personnel exposure to Cadmium during second cut.

    4. Cost of stainless cut wire; cost of disposal (residual blast media and coatings/corrosion); cost of maintenance; utilities cost.

    5. Removal of paints/coating on lightweight aluminum components: Can only use walnut shell (or aluminum oxide or something “softer”); this is very time consuming; adhesion of epoxy primer to steel is no different than that to aluminum.

    6. Noise levels: Associates are exposed to noise levels in excess of 110 dB. Current solution is double hearing protection (muffs and plugs). Blast helmets are modified to make space.

    Technology Need 3. Cadmium Exposure Controls

    Background:

    The following is taken from the Anniston Army Depot’s (ANAD) Cadmium and Abatement Committee Charter.

    “Cadmium is a common corrosion inhibiter and coating for parts on military equipment maintained at ANAD. It is a health hazard regulated under OSHA 29 Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.) 1910.1027. ANAD has been working with AFGE 1945 since 1994 to eliminate if possible and otherwise control this hazard to the maximum extent feasible. These efforts to eliminate the hazard using engineering controls, product substitution, and process changes have met with mixed results. Control and minimization of the hazard has largely being accomplished through the creation of Cadmium Regulated Areas (CRAs), use of personal protective equipment (PPE), development of Letters of Instruction (LOIs) with housekeeping and hygiene controls, comprehensive training, monitoring of the work site, and medical surveillance of the affected workforce. While improvement in compliance with the standard has improved; compliance is not the ultimate goal. Abatement and elimination of the hazard are the ultimate goals. The Cadmium Compliance and Abatement Committee was created to monitor efforts primarily within the Directorate of Production to abate the hazard, to develop and test engineering controls, to aggressively monitor and improve conditions in CRAs. The time has come to move this Committee into a new phase; one where it fully utilizes both on and off post resources, both public and private sources to address the abatement and eventual elimination of the hazard.”

    Challenges:

    1. Control of airborne cadmium exposure during the “blow out” of hull bosses and holes following abrasive blasting.

    2. Control of cadmium (and other metals) fume during assembly and disassembly of tracked vehicles. Elevated exposure typically occurs during the heating (welding, cutting, etc.) of cadmium coated bolts or other hardware.

    3. Control of cadmium fume at the source has proven to be difficult because of the mobility and the nature of the certain tasks.

    4. Exposure sampling results vary dramatically because of variation in task, frequency, amount of source material present, location, environmental factors or other know or unknown conditions

    2015 Michigan Robotics Day

    Thursday April 9, 2015- Ann Arbor, Michigan

    SPACE IS LIMITED > REGISTER NOW!

    Please join us at the North Campus Research Complex (NCRC) for an event co-hosted by the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) and the University of Michigan.

    This free event is open to all ages and has been recognized as the premier national event celebrating National Robotics Week.

    Come experience the cutting-edge advances made by Michigan robotics’ companies and research organizations, hear from leading minds in the field, and see how students at the collegiate and high school levels are involved with these exciting new technologies!

    ESTCP Solicitation for FY 2016 Funding: ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    The Department of Defense’s (DoD) Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) released a solicitation on January 8, 2015, requesting proposals for demonstrations of environmental technologies.

    •DOD ORGANIZATIONS: The DoD Call for Proposals requests pre-proposals related to:

    • Environmental Restoration

    • Munitions Response in Underwater Environments

    • Resource Conservation

    • Weapons Systems and Platforms

    • BAA AND FEDERAL ORGANIZATIONS OUTSIDE DOD: The Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) and Call for Proposals for Federal Organizations Outside DoD request pre-proposals responding to the following topics only:

    • Management of Contaminated Groundwater

    • Detection, Classification, and Remediation of Military Munitions in Underwater Environments

    All pre-proposals are due no later than 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time on March 12, 2015. More information about the solicitation, including instructions and deadlines, is available on the SERDP and ESTCP website at https://serdp-estcp.org/Funding-Opportunities/ESTCP-Solicitations/Environmental-Technologies-Solicitation

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org) with suggestions for this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    Read More

    CTMA Connector January 2015: Special Tribute to Dr. Charles L. “Chuck” Ryan Jr.

    On January 9, 2015 NCMS and the CTMA Program lost a dear friend and colleague. Chuck Ryan passed away suddenly at his home in Pittsfield Township, Michigan. Chuck joined NCMS as a Program Manager in April 1996 and worked eighteen years as the CTMA Director until his departure as the Vice President, Technology in May 2013. Upon hearing this sad news there was an outpouring of testimonials from Chuck’s industry and government partners.

    Chuck was an integral part of CTMA and the program would not be what it is today without his hard work, knowledge and dedication. Chuck’s genuine interest in how he could help his fellow employees, industry and government partners was unparalleled. Chuck always made time for work and volunteering within his community. In particular, he was very active with Habitat for Humanity including trips abroad to Mexico and most recently Haiti. Chuck was an elder at the First Presbyterian Church in Saline, Michigan. This month’s CTMA Connector is a tribute to Chuck. He touched many hearts over the years and he will be sorely missed!!!! Nancy, Zach and Lindsay will be in our prayers.


    Personally and on behalf of Keyport Naval Undersea Warfare Center, this is very sad news for us. Chuck had many friends and I was glad to be one of them.

    Pat Bergan, Keyport

    Chuck was really a great man! We’ll all miss him and have his family in our thoughts and prayers.

    Matt Brennan, Siemens

    Sad to pass along the sad news regarding our friend Chuck Ryan, but do remember with a smile . . . . . .

    Kurt Doehnert, NAVSEA

    So sorry to hear the sad news. Chuck was truly a Great American. Will keep his family in our prayers.

    Gerry Bates, Industrial Base Division, Army

    Wow what an absolute shocker.. Had a great chat and laugh with him at the DoD Maintenance Symposium. He will be missed for sure…still can’t believe it…..
    Phil Rodger, MDS Coating Technologies

    I was very dismayed to hear about Chuck. I drank many a beer with him and he was a good man. He will be sorely missed.

    Greg Russell, Albany Maintenance Center, USMC

    This is very sad news indeed. I remember when Matt and I came out to work with you and Chuck on the NAMII proposal. Chuck was a pleasure to meet and work with. Please let his wife Nancy know that she is in our thoughts.

    Stacey Kerwien, US Army, ARDEC

    I hope everyone at NCMS is doing well. I never got the chance to know him well but I am sure he will be missed. All the best for his family and the team there.

    Carl Dekker, Met-L-Flo, Inc.

    It is very sad to hear of the passing of a friend. Chuck’s mentoring and pragmatic outlook will be missed. His family and friends will be in my prayers.

    Rick Foley, Tobyhanna Army Depot

    Sorry to hear the sad news about Chuck. Prayers to his family and the folks at NCMS on their loss.

    Ken Murphy, NAVAIR

    Zach,
    I just heard the news today... I am so sorry. I can tell you that there are a lot of people that will miss your Dad. He was truly a special person and will be remembered for a long time. I will be thinking about you and will have your entire family in our prayers. Your Dad trying out some photo bombing. 🙂

    Gabe Draguicevich, Fleet Readiness Center Southwest

    I was fortunate to spend some time Chuck just last month at the DoD Maintenance Symposium in Birmingham. The dedicated and passionate folks NCMS attracts to help improve DoD maintenance is one of best strategies to accelerate our Tech Insertion Efforts. Chuck was instrumental in getting us here at FRCSW engaged. I've attached a photo from my collection with a "Chuck Ryan Photobomb." I will miss his hearty handshake and big grin.

    Chris Root, Fleet Readiness Center, Southwest

    My heart is immensely broken at the loss. I feel blessed to have shared so many years working side by side with Chuck. He was always a rock in the storm and his professional talents were a gift - truly a good man. If there is a construction crew in heaven, I expect that he has been welcomed in swinging a hammer and sharing a beer.

    Anita Tolen, NCMS

    During my professional career I have had the privilege of working for three outstanding bosses. Chuck was one of them. His style of support, mentoring and guidance was uniquely capable of obtaining the best from his people, and he gave you his best in return. I will miss him; his entire community of professional colleagues, friends, and acquaintances miss him already and what we all owe you, Chuck, is to emulate you and pass it on.

    Connie Philips, NCMS


    I was very sad to learn of Chuck’s sudden and unexpected passing on January 9th. Chuck was a true partner and a great friend during the decade that I had the privilege of working side-by-side with him on the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. Through Chuck’s technical & management expertise and easy-going manner, CTMA flourished; becoming the DoD’s ”go-to” venue for maintenance technology development and transition. His deep understanding of his DoD maintainer customer and his unwavering commitment to bringing them better tools and processes guided the program through the many challenges and difficulties CTMA faced during his tenure. Notable was the three-fold increase in DoD investment in CTMA after the annual Congressional add was eliminated – a true testament to Chuck’s skill and leadership. As these attributes earned Chuck the moniker of “Father of CTMA”, his uncanny capability to locate errant balls on the golf course earned him the nickname “Digger”. You simply couldn’t lose a ball while playing a round with Chuck. This month, the DoD maintenance community truly lost one of our shining stars. I will sorely miss Chuck both personally and professionally each and every day.

    Greg Kilchenstein, Department of Defense

    Chuck was a wonderful boss, colleague and friend. I would go to him for guidance and advice to help solve a problem. Otherwise he left me alone to manage my projects as I saw fit. Made me grow quickly into a full functioning program manager. I appreciate that very much.

    Bill Chenevert, NCMS

    In the course of a lifetime many friends come and go. There is actually only a small percentage of friends that you will always have contact with and Chuck was like that to me. During the time I worked for Chuck, I got to know him as an unconditional friend and leader.

    Steve Hale, NCMS

    After spending over a decade working with Chuck Ryan I have found it easy to talk about him to anyone. He was an honest, fun-loving guy who cared about what he did and in helping others. When Chuck joined the team at Eclypse he brought the talent of writing; tactful, insightful, and soothing to the read. He assisted me greatly in organizing thoughts, customer input, and tasks into a plan that could be executed succinctly.

    He was the “designated driver” at most times during travel events as we entertained customers and held constructive meetings in which Chuck’s sense of humor brought out memories both of our recent past and of our childhood. It is a gift that is hard to find in people today. I hope to be even half as happy as he through my life. He was indeed my friend.

    Chris Teal, Eclypse International

    Photo from the 25th Annual RC Invitational Golf Tournament. Loss of a brother!

    Sometimes you meet people in your life that you are truly blessed to have known. Chuck was one of them. I met Chuck just over 10 years ago and knew right away that he was a genuine stand-up guy. Chuck always went that extra mile to make sure everyone around him had a good time. We'd be serious now and then and he cherished telling me about his family and how proud he was of his children. Chuck had a deep desire to help those in need around him and he had a unique touch that enabled him to relate to all types of folks making them feel comfortable and that they were thought of. Throughout the years and even though recently I would only see him a few times a year, he was always easy and familiar to be around. I felt that I was hanging out with "A Cool Uncle" and I will miss him dearly. I met Chuck because of my Professional Career but we crossed so easy into my personal life and he truly was a friend.

    Mitch Shikowitz, Agiltron, Inc.


    It was with great sadness that we heard of Dr. Ryan’s untimely passing. Chuck was an energetic and visionary leader as well as a good friend. My shelf is crowded with nearly a dozen CTMA Final Reports of projects in which I was privileged to participate during Chuck’s tenure at NCMS. He was ever supportive and willing to offer wise counsel which led to many successes including Defense Manufacturing Excellence Awards and fielded technologies. The work accomplished under Chuck’s leadership produced benefits that will be felt across the Defense Department for years to come. Chuck will be missed both personally and professionally by all who knew him.

    Bob Appleton, RW Appleton & Co, Inc

    I joined NCMS before Chuck so our friendship spanned his entire NCMS career. With his time in Oklahoma and mine in Texas we shared up close and personal knowledge of the Great Southwest with all of its Deep South charm coupled with cowboy independence. Neither of us missed the hot summers but we shared a love of the outdoors, having both experienced long distance backpack trips in the Rocky Mountains.

    Chuck was a joy to work with and for. He managed the CTMA program from its inception, building it from a promising award to the core NCMS program. He also led its successful evolution from congressionally directed to service directed funding. He was an excellent program director.

    Our strongest link, however, was our shared Christian faith. Chuck took the command to love your neighbor to heart, working relief in Haiti, helping Habitat for Humanity locally, serving food to the homeless, and in so many other ways. He was very much a “hands on” Christian and he will be missed.

    Tony Haynes, NCMS

    I remember Dr. Ryan explaining the benefits of several technical projects currently deployed and the cost savings associated with those projects at the 2007 CTMA Partners Meeting in Bremerton, WA. I was amazed at the energy and enthusiasm at his presentation as well as the buzz in the room from both industry and government. He valued all industry partner and government customer relationships and the impacts of how technology projects could benefit them both.

    I truly admired Dr. Ryan’s passion and work ethic in supporting the OSD CTMA mission as well as directly working with all 19 DoD Depots with technology and sustainment needs to support their missions.

    Dr. Ryan always went the extra mile to engage his employees not only on a professional level, but also on a personnel level because he cared about all of us.

    It’s been an honor to know and to have worked with Dr. Chuck Ryan. I learned a lot from him and he is truly missed.

    Dana Ellis, NCMS

    There are so many things I would like to say about Chuck. Here are my top ten.

    1. Chuck made me laugh each and every day
    2. Chuck had an infectious smile
    3. Chuck taught me that you can find time to volunteer for charities
    4. Chuck was a loving father and husband and spoke about them often
    5. Chuck was always eager and willing to wear the NCMS booth attire (especially the Hawaiian shirts)
    6. Chuck was always willing to do whatever needed to be done no matter how medial the task was.
    7. Chuck would always listen to me (or at least pretend to) and I really appreciated that
    8. Chuck was always there for me when I needed help and guidance
    9. Chuck always had an answer to any problem or concern I had
    10. Chuck was a true friend and mentor and I will cherish my time I had with him each and every day going forward

    Debbie Lilu, NCMS

    Here’s to you Dr. Ryan…………………………………..

    Read More

    Exoskeleton Technology Comes Down to Earth

    Exoskeleton Technology Comes Down to Earth

    John Kirkley

    exoskeleton

    Photo Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

    When Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) strapped on that massive combat exoskeleton in the 1986 movie, Alien, you knew the rampaging extraterrestrial was in for a world of hurt.

    More recently Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems have been designing and testing their own exoskeletons – but rather than combating murderous aliens, these suits are destined for more benign uses.

    NCMS, through its Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) – a collaboration between the Center, its member companies and the Department of Defense– is coordinating tests of the Lockheed Martin and BAE exoskeletons at U.S. Navy shipyards at Puget Sound, WA and Norfolk, VA.

    Photo Courtesy of Lockheed Martin

    Photo Courtesy of Lockheed Martin

     

    One of the jobs undertaken by workers wearing the Lockheed exoskeleton involves removing sound abatement covering wrapped around the hulls of obsolete Navy submarines.  This is hard, dirty work requiring the use of heavy cutting and grinding tools that can weigh as much as 36 pounds. Workers fatigue quickly and risk injury due to the strain on muscles and joints and productivity suffers.

    And this is where an exoskeleton is invaluable. These human augmentation devices significantly increase the wearer’s strength and endurance by transferring the weight of heavy loads from the user’s body directly to the ground. A heavy tool becomes essentially weightless.

    Both the Lockheed Martin and BAE exoskeletons are equipped with zeroG, a gimbaled robotic arm from Equipois.

    According to Dana Ellis, NCMS Senior Program Manager, the flexible, lightweight units have dramatically reduced fatigue and the chance of injury, while boosting productivity by 50%.

    Mantis is the prototype for Lockheed’s next generation exoskeleton known as FORTIS (Latin for “strong”).  Because of its strength and flexibility, FORTIS moves with the worker’s body whether he or she (the suit adapts to a wide range of sizes and body types) is standing, kneeling or walking.  Already, workers fitted with the exoskeleton have experienced a 300% reduction in muscle fatigue, productivity gains of 2 to 27 times, and decreased down time due to injuries.

    Both the Lockheed Mantis and FORTIS are unpowered systems.  BAE is taking a different approach, powering its Orthotic Load Assistance Device (OLAD) with Li-ion rechargeable batteries or a 28-volt drill battery.

    OLAD was initially developed with soldiers carrying heavy backpacks in mind.  However, the company is well aware that they have created a system that can be used in many different applications that require human augmentation, including the demanding work at Naval shipyards.

    The OLAD exoskeleton equipped with a zeroG robotic arm has already been tested at BAE shipyards.  Through the NCMS CTMA program, the units will undergo further testing at the Puget Sound and Norfolk Naval shipyards.

    Lockheed’s FORTIS system will be on display at the upcoming 2014 Maintenance Symposium, November 17-20, Birmingham, AL.  NCMS is showcasing a variety of maintenance capabilities on the CTMA Technology Main Street (Table Top Expo).  The exoskeleton will be featured as part of the CTMA human augmentation technology display. So be sure to stop by the exhibit and see how far exoskeleton technology has evolved since Ripley was locked in mortal combat with that bloodthirsty space alien decades ago.

    You can read the full case study highlighting the Lockheed Martin and BAE Systems exoskeletons here.

    Read More

    CTMA Connector April 2014: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    RoboDayBanner
    April 2014

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities.

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. Learn more about the  CTMA Program.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

     



    This year’s Partners Meeting theme is “Focused Technology Transition” and participants will
    discuss methods for successfully implementing technology at maintenance facilities and to identify other technology initiatives that impact weapon system readiness.

     REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN

    On-site Industry Registration Includes a Tabletop Display

    Live panel discussions will be via video-conference with rebroadcast over the internet to anyone registering for the event. Participants can tune-in to the meeting based on their interests in the agenda.

    DoD and industry personnel are encouraged to participate at the NCMS Headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan. DoD personnel will also have the option to participate via DCO. This year’s program includes twelvepanel sessions that address improving efficiencies, transitioning newtechnologies as well as focusing on specific technology capabilities. Previous OSD Maintenance Challenge Award winners will also provide updates on both the Fastener Removal Improvement Technology Adoption and Industrial Human Augmentation System Prototype Redesign for Affordability Programs.


    More Information and Registration

     

    Depot Maintenance Model-Based Enterprise Forum

     

    On 29-30 April the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Maintenance Policy and Programs (ODASD (MPP)) and NCMS, in partnership with the Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG), is hosting a Depot Maintenance focused Model-Based Enterprise (MBE) Forum to
    share the experiences, challenges, successes, and benefits of DoD efforts in Product Lifecycle Management Integration, Model-Based Systems Engineering, Model-Based Manufacturing,
    and Model-Based Work Instructions. The objective outcome of this event is to expand awareness of the MBE transformation throughout the depot maintenance community of interest and to identify those focus areas that could benefit with tighter integration with
    DoD’s Advanced Manufacturing Enterprise (AME) subpanel as well as the newly formed Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute (DMDI).


    AGENDA & REGISTRATION

     

    Cold Spray Action Team Meeting- June 18-19


    The 2014 Cold Spray Action Team (CSAT) summer meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, June
    18-19 on the campus of Worcester Polytechnic Institute, in Worcester, Massachusetts.

    The agenda has now been finalized and we have participation from the Air Force, Army and
    Navy, as well as from Industry and Academia. CSAT attendees will learn how Cold Spray can be used to produce bulk Nanostructured Materials.

    Event Agenda:

    Vic Champagne, ARL Welcome, Meeting Objectives and New Developments 0800-0825

    Dr. Michael Kane, AMRDEC Status of Army Aviation Cold Spray Transition
    0825-0845

    Fred Lancaster, NAVAIR Navy Air Systems Command Cold Spray Roadmap 0845-0910

    Dr. Brian James, Ellsworth AFB Cold Spray Implementation for the Air Force
    0910-0940

    James Sullivan, Sikorsky Cold Spray Development for UH-60 Magnesium Parts
    0940-1010

    Exhibit Area BREAK and NETWORKING 1010-1040

    Michael Nicholas, Boeing Cold Spray for Apache Main Transmission Gearbox

    1040-1105

    Neil Matthews, Rosebank Engineering CS for Australian Defense Department
    1105-1135

    Mike Klecka Additive Manufacturing Technology and Cold Spray 1135-1205

    Exhibit Area LUNCH 1205-1300

    Aaron Nardi, UTRC Structural CS Al Alloys & CS Additive Manufacturing

    1300-1325

    Dr. Enrique Barrera, Rice University Cold Spray Nanostructured 5083 Aluminum
    1325-1350

    Tom Stamey, Puget Sound N. Shipyard TD 63 Actuator Cold Spray Inside Diameter
    Repair 1350-1415

    Dr. Jennifer Wolk, NAVAIR Characterization of Low Pressure Al Coatings
    1415-1450

    Dr. Luke Brewer, Naval Post Graduate Microstructure Relationships-CS
    Stainless Steel Coatings 1450-1515

    Exhibit Area BREAK and NETWORKING 1515-1545

    Rob Hrabe, H.F. Webster Engineering OSD Mantech Program Cold Spray

    Development 1545-1615

    Chris Howe, MidAmerica-MOOG Cold Spray Applications and Qualification
    1615-1645

    In-Transit Transportation to MidAmerica, Webster, MA 1645-1715

    Chris Howe & Ben Hoiland, MOOG Tour and Demonstration of OSD Mantech CS

    System 1715-1800

    In-Transit Transportation back to Odeum Center, WPI 1800-1830

    Reception Odeum Center, WPI 1830-2100

    George Lecakes , Rowan University Virtual Reality, Odeum Conference Center,

    Reception 1900-1945


    REGISTRATION

     

    NCMS Kicks Off Michigan Robotics Week with Industry Executive Forum


    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered with General Dynamics Land Systems and Macomb County with the first annual Michigan Robotics Industry Executive Forum. More than 100 business leaders and technology innovators participated in the day-long event at the Maneuver Collaboration Center (MC2) on the General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS) campus in Sterling Heights.

    Michigan Governor Rick Snyder (R-MI) challenged over 100 attendees to move beyond the ultra-technical and develop a unified message about the economic promise of advanced robotics. “Michigan can lead robotics technology,” Snyder stated, “Not just the politicians in Lansing, but everyone. Michigan can lead robotics technology in the United States.”

    READ MORE



     

    Submit Your Project Ideas to JTEG

    JTEG The purpose of the Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) is to improve coordination in the
    introduction of new or improved technology, new processes, or new equipment into Department of Defense Depot Maintenance Activities. JTEG seeks ways to better leverage technology improvements in depot maintenance through collaboration to support the higher DoD goals of improving effectiveness and efficiency.

     

    Please submit your technology ideas and projects as well as your technology needs for evaluation:

    JTEG Project Ideas

     

    CTMA Project Success: H-6 and H-47 Helicopters Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) Systems

    Problem:

    FADEC systems, the “brains” to the operation of the aircraft engines, are vital to engine control and performance. The failure of a FADEC system can result in a complete loss of engine control, a reduction in power or even engine shut-down. Such failures have resulted in failed missions, loss of aircraft, and, in the worst case, loss of air crew and passengers. The US Army 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) is a special operations force that provides helicopter aviation support for general purpose and special operations forces. Its missions include attack, assault, and reconnaissance, and
    are usually conducted at high speeds, low altitudes, at night or during low visibility tactical conditions and on short notice. Their weapon systems need to perform at any time all the time. Therefore, the reliable operation of the FADEC system is vital to their mission.


    The 160th SOAR(A) has experienced chronic and continuing intermittent
    symptoms in the Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) Systems on two different platforms (MH-47G and MH-6M) that were ultimately caused by the deterioration of the harness interface between the Digital Engine
    Control unit (DECU) or Engine Control Unit (ECU) and the Hydro-Mechanical Assembly (HMA) or Hydro-Mechanical Unit (HMU). Such
    intermittent symptoms usually result in the replacement of the DECU/ECU, then the HMA/MHU one or more times before the causal condition is identified in the harness interface (wiring, contacts, and connectors).
    <![if !vml]><![endif]>

    Solution:

    <![if !vml]><![endif]>
    Eclypse International’s Automatic Wire Test Set (AWTS) aids wiring diagnostics of electrical and electronic devices. The Test Control Unit (TCU) uses resistance measurements, capacitance measurements, and AC/DC
    voltage measurements to perform continuity,  insulation, and isolation tests. Working closely with the 160th SOAR(A), Eclypse is operationalizing the use of AWTS for diagnosis and repair of electrical systems on the MH-6M and MH-47G aircraft. In addition, Army personnel are developing their own test methodologies, and being trained to learn, develop, teach, and trouble-shoot electrical issues for the aircraft which they must maintain.

    Results and Benefits:

    • Accidents involving the MH-6M and MH-47 have been attributed to FADEC failures. This solution is increasing aircraft safety.
    • Increased readiness and reliability of the MH-6M and the MH-47G is a direct benefit of this solution. Successful deployment of the AWTS technology on the FADEC systems will be applicable and transferable to the entire C/MH-47 fleet, the entire MH-6M fleet, and the OH-58D fleet which
      uses the same FADEC as the MH-6M.
    • Currently, the M1A1 turbine engine that includes electronic control systems analogous to those on the rotary aircraft fleet. Lessons learned from this initiative would speed test development for the Abrams fleet. With a current inventory of over 4000 tanks, increasing the reliability and readiness of the fleet offers a tremendous cost savings opportunity for the DoD.
    • Electronic Control Systems, such as FADEC, are vital components of a wide variety of aircraft, marine, and ground weapon systems such as the Abrams tank, the Joint Strike Fighter, missiles, submarines, UAVs, and rotary wing aircraft as examples. The technology being developed in this
      initiative specifically for the MH-6M and MH-47G will provide opportunities to perform insitu testing on a wide array of installed complex electronic components in a broad array of weapon systems across all the militaryservices.

    NCMS Launches 2014 U.S. Nanomanufacturing Survey


    NCMS has partnered with the National Science Foundation under the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) to launch its latest study of commercialization trends in nanotechnology and nanofabrication– previous studies were performed in 2003, 2006 and 2009.

    More



    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org) with suggestions for this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    Sender Information
    To be removed from future mailings please reply with "unsubscribe all" to be removed from ALL NCMS mailings.

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    3025 Boardwalk
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    ©2014 National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.

    Read More

    CTMA Connector March 2014: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
     
    RoboDayBanner
     

    March 2014

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities.

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful.

    Learn more about the CTMA Program.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    Spotlight-Email--2014


    Promoting Dual Use Robotics and Autonomous Systems Technology Between the Defense and Commercial Sectors

    Tuesday April 8, 2014
    General Dynamics Land Systems
     Maneuver Collaboration Center (mc2)
    Sterling Heights, Michigan

    SPACE IS LIMITED -> REGISTER NOW! REGISTRATION DEADLINE MARCH 31.

    Please plan on attending this event to learn about opportunities for dual use autonomous vehicle and robotics technology to transform your business. Southeast Michigan is home to a number of companies that have developed technology for the Department of Defense that is now available for transition to commercial use.
     

    This event will feature Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, technology demonstrations, presentations, and a panel discussion hosted at the General Dynamics Land Systems Maneuver Collaboration Center (mc2) in Sterling Heights, Michigan. MORE

    ESTCP Solicitations for FY 2015 Funding: ENVIRONMENTAL AND INSTALLATION ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES

    The Department of Defense’s (DoD) Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) released solicitations on February 11, 2014, requesting proposals for demonstrations of environmental and energy technologies.

    DOD ORGANIZATIONS: The DoD Calls for Proposals request pre-proposals related to:

    • Assessment of Vapor Intrusion;
    • Weapons Systems and Platforms;
    • Energy Efficiency for Military Building; and
    • Water Conservation and Reuse for Military Facilities.

    BAA and NON-DOD FEDERAL ORGANIZATIONS: The Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) and Non-DoD Federal Call for Proposals request pre-proposals responding to the following topics only:

    • Assessment of Vapor Intrusion from Subsurface Volatile Organic Compound Contamination; and
    • Energy Efficiency for Military Buildings.

    ESTCP is not seeking proposals in the Munitions Response or Resource Conservation program areas at this time.

    The due date for all pre-proposals is Tuesday, April 1, 2014. More information about the solicitations, including instructions and deadlines, is available on the SERDP and ESTCP web site at www.serdp-estcp.org/Funding-Opportunities/ESTCP-Solicitations

    JTEG and Cold Spray Action Team Announce New Partnership

    The Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) and the Cold Spray Action Team (CSAT) have entered into a new Partnership agreement that enhance the effectiveness of both organizations. The JTEG is working with CSAT to form an Integrated Product Team (WIPT) to improve cold spray repair coordination involving the introduction of new or improved technology, new processes, or new equipment into DoD depot maintenance activities. The Cold Spray Repair WIPT will work with CSAT to seek ways to better leverage technology and process improvements in cold spray repair through collaboration to support the higher DoD goals of improving effectiveness and efficiency that will have widespread applicability across all sectors of industry. During the meeting, the CSAT-JTEG WIPT will facilitate a working session to collaboratively form working teams to execute and deliver the cold spray transition enablers identified in the WIPT charter.

    The CSAT 2014 Meeting has been scheduled for June 18-19, 2014 and will take place at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), Worcester, MA. We are planning to maintain a well rounded agenda whose emphasis will be ‘Cold Spray Structural Repair and Additive Manufacturing’. More

     

    Save the Date- NCMS 2014 CTMA Partners Meeting May 20-22

    The 15th CTMA Annual Partners Meeting (formerly referred to as Annual Symposium) is a combination virtual and networking event. Due to increased interest this event has been expanded to three full days this year.

    This year’s Partners Meeting theme is “Focused Technology Transition”” and participants will discuss methods for successfully implementing technology at maintenance facilities and to identify other technology initiatives that impact weapon system readiness.

    For more information please contact Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, (734) 995-7038.


    Project Announcements


    U.S. Marine Corps Condition-Based Maintenance (CBM+) Enterprise Implementation Initiative

    As with all transformational initiatives, policy and guidance are not enough to affect the needed sweeping changes to achieve critical mass for CBM+ implementation. Budget constraints will impact not only the ability to operate and maintain equipment across the DoD, but also to invest in process and system improvements designed to mitigate the impact of the resource constraints. This “catch-22” situation results in individual weapon systems programs taking the initiative to develop CBM+ solutions, which ultimately result in multiple, non-integrated solutions which use multiple proprietary technologies. This dissuades program resources to fill enterprise gaps, disallows most programs access to CBM+ solutions, and delivers sub-optimal solutions in “stove-pipes” and creates barriers which impede most legacy platforms from access to best-in-class commercial practices and technologies.

    This CTMA initiative will consist of a CBM+ Capabilities Based Assessment (CBA) of capabilities and processes as well as a Business Case Analysis.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    AGT 1500 Engines with Coated Compressor Blades Business Case Analysis

    Air and ground vehicles and ships rely on gas turbine engines designed in the early 1960s to power their fleets. These old engines voraciously consume fuel and produce high rates of carbon emissions. The Air Force’s F-15 and F-16 and the Navy’s F-18 fighter aircrafts consume between 800 and 1500 gallons per hour while the Army’s fleet of M1A Abrams tank travels only 0.6 miles/gallon.

    Comparing the condition of the coated compressor airfoils to the uncoated airfoils indicates that a return-on-investment (ROI) is possible strictly due to parts savings. The specific project work scope would include the development of a business case analysis.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    Industrial Human Augmentation Systems (iHAS) for Improved Shipyard Operations

    Building Navy ships is a very rigorous and exhausting task performed each day by workers at shipyards. Non-augmented workers endure injuries from muscle fatigue, ergonomic stress, and exhaustion on a daily basis from manipulating heavy tools for extended periods of time. Because of this, shipyards lose millions of dollars each year through workers’ compensation and training new worker.

    The work that will be accomplished under this project includes two prototype iHAS units for test and evaluation (T&E) of many different maintenance and repair applications doing actual production work at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. To facilitate project execution, two MANTIS units will be leased to the Navy to begin T&E until the next generation units are ready for delivery. The T&E will include measuring worker productivity, work quality and ergonomic considerations. In addition, a Safety Assessment of the iHAS will be performed by a cross organizational, multi-service team to assess the risks of using an iHAS in comparison to the benefits the iHAS provides.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Dana Ellis, (360) 782-1370, danae@ncms.org

    Recently Completed CTMA Projects

    Final reports will be available to NCMS members in 18 months and 30 months to all others for these recently completed projects. List of NCMS Technical Reports — Available for Purchase

    Joint Test Protocol for Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    The project examined natural and manufactured sands and dusts to determine key features needed in a manufactured CMAS test media. A new test media was developed that appears to form CMAS glass with the concurrent formation of water, sulfate, and chloride vapor. It took a model of what the test media should behave like and developed a real, testable, material that can be used in laboratory and for full-scale testing.

    Digital Pen and Paper for Capturing Maintenance Data

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the potential for time and quality improvements by capturing the user’s written data with a digital pen. The study also investigated potential process improvements that could be undertaken as a result of the use of the digital pen. It was found that a median of 7-11 days cycle time reduction could be attained; up to a 6.3% cycle time improvement for a planned 175-day repair process

    Metal Finishing Development Program – Phases I & II

    A comprehensive computer-based training program (The Basics of Hard Chrome Plating) was designed to educate and train the depot metal finishing workforce in basic electroplating and other metal finishing processes. Three supplemental modules were also developed: Electroplating Electro-Chemistry Bath Simulator, Current Density Calculator and Electroplater Troubleshooting Guide. The ease-of-access and availability to the training and online reference materials by the shop floor artisans has been an invaluable tool.

    Automated Rotor Blade Stripping System (ARBSS) Enhancement

    In 2009, an NCMS project successfully demonstrated that a laser-based coating removal system could be integrated with a robotic positioning capability to operate within a Navy rotor blade sustainment environment. Currently, however, the ARBSS coating removal process is not formally approved for use on V-22 material. The principal concern was that the copper mesh in the V-22 material may adversely interact with the laser energy to induce heating and substrate damage not observed in the original ARBSS qualification testing. There was no evidence that temperatures within composites processed reach levels that would cause concern nor was there any significant damage to the composite in terms of strength or modulus variations.

    Corrosion Resistant Solid State Thin-Walled Component Joining for Maintenance and Repair Applications – Phase I & II

    The project sought to develop and test a new solid state joining method called Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) that did not melt the materials to be joined thus increasing dimensional accuracy, corrosion resistance, and weld cycle time. The solution was constructed and installed on two HMMWV vehicle sub-structures and blast tested.

    New Technology Metal Deposition Repair

    Laser deposition processes were explored as a means for replacing the worn and damaged material on high-value metallic components. As part of this work, the characterization of a LENS® system at NUWC Keyport was performed, to include both the laser and power feeding portions of the system.

    Automated Intensifier Measurement System (AIMS) Correlation Upgrade Support

    AIMS used automated machine vision techniques to reliably characterize image intensifier tubes and low light digital sensors. Although reasonable correlation was established between the NVESD manual test sets and AIMS, there were some tests that required refinements which were completed under this project. Upgrades were made to hardware, firmware, test procedures as well as adding new capabilities.

    Automated Process & Inspection Guide (AP&IG) Summarization

    Utilizing Aspire Solutions, Inc.’s commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software in conjunction with COTS mobile computing devices allowed depots and worksites to realize improved accuracy and standardized inspection results. Strong bottom line results were delivered showing improvements in the cost to inspect/repair systems while reducing the overall number of personnel required.

    Automated Process & Inspection Guide (AP&IG) – Data Capture at Rock Island Arsenal

    As part of the realignment of documentation from Rock Island to TACOM, this project focused upon how to effectively and efficiently extract meta-data and properly index a digital file to make it easily searchable. It also involved optimizing the file so that file sizes were manageable without impacting optical character recognition quality and readability.

    Automated Process & Inspection Guide (AP&IG) In-Process Mobile Paper Replacement Validation Solution (IMPRoVS)

    The project replaced inefficient paper-based processes with mobile data capture devices combined with Aspire Solutions, Inc.’s COTS software for Red River’s repair programs. Return on investment for the first year is $373K in combined manpower hours, paper savings, storage space and research hours expended.

    Virtual Workplace Simulator – Phases I & II

    Through the use of simulation technology and physical dynamic interface in the Virtual Workplace Simulator, Pendaran delivered accelerated, problem-based learning to individuals staffed at all levels of the organization. The intense, “live-fire” simulation provided the context for physical, psychological and intellectual experiences that lead to long-term learning retention.

    Marine Corps Total Life Cycle Management Support – Phase I & II

    Support was provided to perform gap analysis, improve process flows, conduct forums to develop cross-functional governance, and undertake projects to analyze specific problem areas to recommend solutions for the Marine Corps to effectively support development of the proposed “Middle Weight” Corps.

    TARDEC Track Test Machine

    The Army’s physical simulation effort for ground vehicles at the Physical Simulation Laboratory (PSL) and the Tire, Run-Flat, and Road Wheel Simulation Laboratory (TR2SL) regularly tests HMMWVs, MRAPs, Strykers, and trailers, among other vehicles, to validate and verify the durability of whole-vehicle and component systems, such as armor, frames, suspensions, run-flats, tires, and road wheels. However, the PSL lacked two important capabilities: the ability to perform active testing of electronics at extremes of temperature, humidity, vibration, and shock and also the ability to test track systems such as that of the M1A2 tank at extremes of speed and load. This project through the CTMA program closed the track testing gap by providing PSL with the needed capabilities.

    Robotic Systems Joint Program Office (RSJPO) – Interoperability for Tactical Robot Control

    The project demonstrated two government-owned operator control unit applications controlling two separately developed IOP v0-compliant UGV, with the implication that either of the demonstrated applications is capable of controlling any IOP compliant UGV

    Robotic Systems Joint Program Office (RSJPO) –Interoperability for Micro Robot Weight Class Unmanned Ground Systems (UGS)

    The RSJPO launched a program to reduce the deficiencies through development and application of an Interoperability Profile (IOP) standard. An IOP-compliant system decouples operator control unit (OCU) and UGV development.

    IUID Marking for Legacy Parts – Navy Pilot

    DoD mandates that all parts and subassemblies valued over $5,000 receive Item Unique Identifier (IUID) markings for life cycle tracking purposes. IUID marking technology is mature so the mandate imposed no significant challenge for new items. For legacy items, however, tech data must be modified to specify how and where to mark the part. For legacy parts already in inventory, the non-recurring engineering (NRE) cost is prohibitive. This project demonstrated a cost saving solution for parts falling under the mandate that already have data or name plates. Shape search provided a means of using a name plate shape as a template to find the plate in the body of a drawing.

    Logistics Master Data Management Proof-of-Concept Capabilities-Based Assessment and Data Storage & Utilization Strategy

    This CTMA project determined the capabilities required to store the data, identified the person¬nel and organizational requirements needed to support data warehouse requirements, and the proof-of-concept identified and validated the requirements for mining and visualizing the data stored in the proposed data warehouse.

    MAGTF Logistics Support Systems (MLS2) Interoperability Demonstration and Capabilities Based Assessment

    The introduction of an integration strategy for MLS2 maximizes training, mission readiness, sustainment, combat readiness and logistical support for deployed MAGTFs. By focusing on capabilities, rather than functions or systems, the strategy defined is able to provide a holistic approach for providing logistics support to the MAGTF.

    Coalition Logistics Interoperability/Joint Logistics Integration (CLI/JLI)
    The CLI/JLI project explored, demonstrated, studied, and calculated the benefits of a suite of advanced logistics interoperability enablers. Principal technologies were demonstrated and proven at three separate logistics technology exercises. The events provided unique opportunities to evaluate these capabilities and develop strategies for a way forward.

    Marine Corps Logistics Portfolio Consolidation Proof-of-Concept Business Case Analysis and Demonstration

    The project solidly established the foundation and framework to baseline the current Marine Corps LOG IT Portfolio. This will allow the Marine Corps to optimize its LOG IT Portfolio which will lead to increased agility to respond to changing requirements and to reduce LOG IT system sustainment costs.

    Marine Corps Distribution IT Portfolio Notional Solution and Proof-of-Concept

    The project assisted in identifying and refining the Marine Corps logistics community’s IT requirements as well as buying down the Marine Corps requirements and acquisition risk. The tasks defined in this project improve operating forces and supporting establishment distribution systems, application, processes and asset visibility positively impacting weapon system readiness.

    Contractor Property Management of Maintenance

    A detailed end-to-end study was conducted of the current Contractor Property Management process, taking into account the upgrades planned for the near future. Potential gaps were identified and recommendations were made to correct or alleviate these weaknesses.

    Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) Warfighter Maintenance and Implementation and Operations Support

    Assistance was provided to the Operational Advisory Group in identifying areas of concern, creating a way ahead, and devising improvements upon the systems, processes and procedures associated with Global Combat Service Support Marine Corps (GCSS-MC) as identified by Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC) to include but not exclusive to combat service support operations in CONUS and deployed environments. The focus was improved performance, capabilities, functionality, and user understanding of GCSS-MC in its current and future state as it relates to maintenance and supply activities, directives, policies, and operations.

    Intermittent Fault Detection & Isolation System (IFDIS) Central Air Data Computer (CADC) Test Program Set (TPS)

    Capabilities were provided to Hill AFB to test F-16 chassis circuitry for intermittent faults, open circuits and short circuits directly addressing the no-fault found problem currently costing the DoD as much as $10B annually.

    Legacy Test Program Migration Optimization

    During the project, Analysis, Integration & Design Inc. (AIDI) accomplished the design and generation of an ITA based on the migration of a selected Common Automated Support System (CASS) legacy test program onto a new commercial test platform using ConVEx® implementing the resource pre-allocator and the ITAG tool. Cost and scheduling results showed drastically reduced test program set (TPS) migration times and significantly faster ITA design and generation times that lowered average costs incurred via engineering efforts.

    Enhancing DoD Maintenance Interactions with Industry Using Virtual Methodologies

    Virtual events cannot replicate every aspect of physical meetings, but given budget constraints and travel restrictions, events using solutions like the one created for this project can prevent cancellations and foster virtual collaborations.

    Model Based Definition for Aircraft Launch, Recovery and Support Equipment

    This project established new processes utilizing only 3D data versus the traditional two-dimensional (2D) representations of the 3D data. The new 3D Technical Data Package (TDP) conveyed the design intent to the manufacturing artisans with significantly greater fidelity.

    Submit Your Project Ideas to JTEG

    JTEG The purpose of the Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) is to improve coordination in the introduction of new or improved technology, new processes, or new equipment into Department of Defense Depot Maintenance Activities. JTEG seeks ways to better leverage technology improvements in depot maintenance through collaboration to support the higher DoD goals of improving effectiveness and efficiency.

    Please submit your technology ideas and projects as well as your technology needs for evaluation:  JTEG Project Ideas

    Member News

    DLA & Marines Test Wireless Command & Control System for Material Handling Equipment to Improve Safety, Increase Productivity, Reduce Costs

    To help drive costs out of material handling operations, the DLA and Marine Corps are testing two versions of a Wireless Command & Control System (WCCS) for industrial trucks. Each facility is testing the system on approximately 50 industrial trucks. The wireless technology behind CMMS was adapted from commercial Vehicle Management Systems (VMS) used in the factories and distribution centers of companies like Ford Motor Company, Procter & Gamble, Toyota, and Wal-Mart. Based on the experiences of companies like these, as well as an initial pilot program at Sierra Army Depot, the DoD expects the WCCS to save tens of millions of dollars across its fleet of thousands of industrial vehicles.

    idsystems The WCCS reduces vehicle maintenance costs and improves fleet availability by automatically/wirelessly uploading critical vehicle data, reporting vehicle problems in real time, scheduling maintenance according to actual vehicle usage rather than on a calendar basis, and helping determine the optimal economic time to replace equipment. The system improves productivity by establishing accountability for vehicle use, ensuring equipment is in the proper place at the right time, streamlining work flow, and providing extensive metrics on asset utilization. In addition, the system improves safety and security by restricting equipment access only to authorized operators and providing electronic vehicle inspection checklists.

    “We are very excited to evaluate wireless technology with proven abilities in the commercial sector to reduce maintenance costs, manage operating condition, and increase productivity of material handling vehicles,” said Kilchenstein. “The DoD maintains a large fleet of these types of vehicles across its installations, and improvements in fleet up-time, cost control and utilization can make a significant impact on materiel readiness.”

    The WCCS systems are designed, produced and implemented by New Jersey-based I.D. Systems, Inc. (www.id-systems.com), a leading global provider of wireless solution for securing, tracking and managing high-value mobile assets, such as forklifts and aircraft ground support equipment.

    Member Project News

    Separations Research High Performance Fiber Netting Now Commercially Available

    Netting is currently used on U.S. Navy ships to provide fall protection for landing/maintenance crews. This netting in past years was fabricated using metallic cord and at present is constructed from nylon braid. The metal nets were quite durable, but added to the ship radar cross-section and were heavy. The nylon used now is lightweight and has no radar signature, but must be replaced every 12 to18 months due to UV degradation and abrasion.

    We utilized various high performance fibers to address the Navy's need for an improved deck-edge safety net with a 5+ year life-cycle. Initially, lightweight cords were produced and tested for their ability to withstand harsh marine environments and loading conditions. Test results indicate that superior mechanical properties and weatherability can be achieved using cords with high-strength fiber based cores. Subsequent testing of advanced long-life netting was refined and installed on a selected Navy vessel such as DDG-51 and DDG-83. Another valuable aspect of this design, is that should any damage come to the netting, ample surplus cordage is provided so that repairs can be made directly at sea. Netting fabrication schemes were also developed that significantly reduce the logistics burden and time for assembly/installation. During installation training of enlisted personnel is conducted and appropriate training documentation prepared.

    Since the inception of this advanced netting system, we have installed and carefully monitored the life and durability of a shipset of nets on the USS-HOWARD. The nets were in service for 6 years and upon removal retained 90% of their initial strength. The USS HOWARD and USS WASP, continue to have these nets in service today.

    BENEFITS: Our long-life netting will provide the Navy with a lightweight personnel safety webbing which will be inexpensive to maintain and robust enough to last 5+ years in harsh marine environments. Government and commercial applications for long-life safety nets are numerous and include a number of near-term and future applications. The cords alone can find use in markets such as sonobuoy cables, ship handling cables, helicopter rescue cables, parachutes cords, stainless wire replacement, and trawl cables. On naval vessels, applications such as emergency egress trunk nets, save-all nets, or cargo nets are excellent examples where this technology can be used.

    Commercially these nets can be procured through Separations Research, LLC in conjuction with Diamond Nets, Inc of Everson, WA. For further information concerning this technology and procurement, Contact John P. Puglia of Separations Research, LLC via phone 978-549-7791 or john.puglia@separationsresearch.com

    NCMS Launches 2014 U.S. Nanomanufacturing Survey

    NANOSurvey NCMS has partnered with the National Science Foundation under the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) to launch its latest study of commercialization trends in nanotechnology and nanofabrication– previous studies were performed in 2003, 2006 and 2009. More


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org) with suggestions for this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    Sender Information
    To be removed from future mailings please reply with "unsubscribe all" to be removed from ALL NCMS mailings.

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    3025 Boardwalk
    Ann Arbor, MI 48108

    ©2014 National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.

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    CTMA Connector February 2014: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    RoboDayBanner
    February

    2014

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful.

    Learn more about the
    CTMA Program.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body. 


    Virtual Event- Advanced Wiring and LRU/WRA Circuit Path Inspection Capabilities Forum

    February 27



    The Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Maintenance Policy and Programs (ODASD(MPP)) and NCMS, in partnership with the Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG), is hosting a virtual Advanced Wiring and LRU/WRA Testing and Diagnostics Capabilities Forum to share the experiences, challenges, successes, and benefits of DoD efforts in advanced wiring and electronics diagnostics capabilities.

    This forum will examine the military Services’ needs for wiring and LRU/WRA circuit path testing and the variety of approaches and technologies they are pursuing to meet their requirements. The technologies will include automated test equipment that aids wiring and circuit path diagnostics of electrical and electronic devices.

    More

    JTEG and Cold Spray
    Action Team and Announce New Partnership



    The
    Joint Technology Exchange Group
    (JTEG)
    and the Cold
    Spray Action Team (CSAT)
    have entered into a new Partnership agreement that
    enhance the effectiveness of both organizations from now on. The JTEG is working
    with CSAT to form an Integrated Product Team (WIPT) to improve cold spray repair
    coordination involving the introduction of new or improved technology, new
    processes, or new equipment into DoD depot maintenance activities. The Cold
    Spray Repair WIPT will work with CSAT to seek ways to better leverage technology
    and process improvements in cold spray repair through collaboration to support
    the higher DoD goals of improving effectiveness and efficiency that will have
    widespread applicability across all sectors of industry. During the meeting, the
    CSAT-JTEG WIPT will facilitate a working session to collaboratively form working
    teams to execute and deliver the cold spray transition enablers identified in
    the WIPT charter.



    The CSAT 2014 Meeting has been scheduled for
    June 18-19, 2014 and will take place at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI),
    Worcester, MA. We are planning to maintain a well rounded agenda whose emphasis
    will be ‘Cold Spray Structural Repair and Additive Manufacturing’.
    More



     

    Save the Date- NCMS 2014 CTMA Partners
    Meeting May 20-22

     

    The 15th CTMA Annual Partners Meeting (formerly referred to as Annual
    Symposium) is a combination virtual and networking event. Due to increased
    interest this event has been expanded to three full days this year.

    This year’s Partners Meeting theme is “Focused Technology Transition”” and
    participants will discuss methods for successfully implementing technology at
    maintenance facilities and to identify other technology initiatives that impact
    weapon system readiness.

    For more information please contact Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org,
    (734) 995-7038.

     

    Project Announcement

    U.S. Marine Corps Condition-Based
    Maintenance (CBM+) Enterprise Implementation Initiative

     

    As with all transformational initiatives, policy and guidance are not enough to
    affect the needed sweeping changes to achieve critical mass for CBM+
    implementation. Budget constraints will impact not only the ability to operate
    and maintain equipment across the DoD, but also to invest in process and system
    improvements designed to mitigate the impact of the resource constraints. This
    “catch-22” situation results in individual weapon systems programs taking the
    initiative to develop CBM+ solutions, which ultimately result in multiple,
    non-integrated solutions which use multiple proprietary technologies. This
    dissuades program resources to fill enterprise gaps, disallows most programs
    access to CBM+ solutions, and delivers sub-optimal solutions in “stove-pipes”
    and creates barriers which impede most legacy platforms from access to
    best-in-class commercial practices and technologies.

    This CTMA initiative will consist of a CBM+ Capabilities Based Assessment (CBA)
    of capabilities and processes as well as a Business Case Analysis.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie
    Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org



     

    Submit Your Project
    Ideas to JTEG

    JTEG The purpose of the Joint
    Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) is to improve coordination in the
    introduction of new or improved technology, new processes, or new
    equipment into Department of Defense Depot Maintenance Activities. JTEG
    seeks ways to better leverage technology improvements in depot
    maintenance through collaboration to support the higher DoD goals of
    improving effectiveness and efficiency.

     

    Please submit your technology ideas and projects as well as your technology
    needs for evaluation:

    JTEG Project Ideas

     

    Member News

    Praise for BlackGold® Coating
    Continues – ESTCP Project of the Year for 2013

     

    MDS Coating Technologies Corporation (MCT) is pleased to announce that its
    BlackGold® Coating Project with the US Government was selected as ESTCP Project
    of the Year for 2013. This new Award is on the heels of the BlackGold® Coating
    receiving the R&D 100 Award, as one of the 100 most technologically significant
    products introduced into the commercial marketplace within the past year,
    following a nomination by the U.S. Department of Energy.

    The BlackGold® Coating Project was selected out of over 100 ESTCP projects
    because of its tremendous test results and corresponding impact on fuel
    efficiency and emissions. The report* stated: “The study found that the coating
    can improve fuel efficiency by as much as 5 percent, which could result in
    substantial savings in fuel costs, as well as reducing carbon emissions. The
    study also demonstrated these innovative coatings can extend the life of the
    airfoils, leading to further cost savings by reducing repairs and extending the
    life of the aircraft and tank engines”.

    “We are extremely excited about the industry recognition we have recently
    received, this has heightened the awareness and demand for our game changing
    technology for commercial, industrial and military markets, from OEMs to
    operators” said Phil Rodger MCT President & COO.


    Spectro Announces Improved Portable Oil
    Analysis Kit

     

    Keep your high value equipment running at peak efficiency. With Spectro
    Inc.’s recently- enhanced Portable Oil Analysis Kit, you can measure viscosity,
    acidity, oxidation and water or coolant contamination – all in just a few
    minutes. Find out what’s new with our Portable Oil Analysis Kit:

    FluidScan® Q1000 Infrared Analyzer

    Newly Improved


    Combination Kit

    • New detector for 2x improvement in signal to noise ratio
    • New library interface for enhanced repeatability, and reproducibility• 20% increase in oil library (over 500 oils)• ASTM D7889 compliance

    SpectroVisc Q3000 Series Kinematic Viscometer

    Newly Improved


    Combination Kit

    • Improved split cell for greater accuracy, repeatability and
    reproducibility
    • * Viscosity measurements comparable to values from ASTM D445 capillary
    viscometer


    Learn More

     

    NCMS Launches 2014 U.S.
    Nanomanufacturing Survey




    NCMS has partnered with the National
    Science Foundation under the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) to
    launch its latest study of commercialization trends in nanotechnology
    and nanofabrication– previous studies were performed in 2003, 2006 and
    2009.

    More



    Digital Manufacturing SIG Meeting-
    March 5, 2014

     

    NCMS and its collaborative partners have identified digital manufacturing as
    one of the key innovations that will drive North American manufacturing
    competitiveness in the 21st Century. . Digital manufacturing is the dramatically
    intensified application of manufacturing intelligence using advanced data
    analytics and modeling & simulation (M&S) to produce a fundamental
    transformation in how we make things.

    NCMS members are invited to attend the next NCMS Digital Manufacturing
    Strategic Interest Group (DM SIG) meeting held at Dassault Systèmes Americas
    Corp. in Waltham, MA on March 5th.

    For more information please contact:

    Alissa Roath at alissar@ncms.org or Andrea
    Carson at andreac@ncms.org

     

    Save the Dates- Celebrate Michigan
    Robotics- April 8 and April 10

     

    NCMS is partnering with General Dynamics and Macomb County Department of
    Planning to present Michigan Robotics Industry Day on Thursday April 10 in
    Sterling Heights, MI.

    NCMS is partnering with the University of Michigan to present Michigan
    Robotics Day
    on Thursday April 10 in Ann Arbor, MI.

    For more information please contact:

    Phil Calllihan at philc@ncms.org


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org) with suggestions for this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

            

    Sender Information
    To be removed from future mailings please reply with "unsubscribe all" to be removed from ALL NCMS mailings.

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    3025 Boardwalk
    Ann Arbor, MI 48108

    ©2014 National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.

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    CTMA Connector January 2014: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    RoboDayBanner
    January 2014

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. 

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful.

    Learn more about the CTMA Program.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body. 

    Erosion Coatings Project Wins ESTCP Award

    2013-Dec-protective-coating-jet-fuel_articleimageAn innovative new protective coating for jet engine compressor blades, demonstrated in an ESTCP-funded study, could save DoD tens of millions of dollars by extending the life of the engines and improving fuel efficiency, and at the same time reducing carbon emissions. The NCMS project team was recognized for outstanding research and technology developments that will benefit the Department of Defense (DoD). More

    NCMS West Introduction

    Since 2003, NCMS has had a presence in the Pacific Northwest. Initial programs addressed security at Navy Region Northwest installations, including vulnerability and risk assessment, emergency management processes and infrastructure, evaluation of credentialing, camera and alarm technologies. Focus has expanded to include industrial/maintenance technology projects at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Naval Undersea Warfare Center Keyport, including ground-breaking laser-deposition repair process development resulting in previously unheard-of Return on Investment potential for the Navy. More

    NCMS Team wins 2013 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award

    GreenChem-3790 Hi ResThe CTMA Functional Trivalent Chrome Validation team, led by NCMS, was honored with the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award for 2013 for Small Business. The prestigious award was one of five awards presented at an official award ceremony in Washington DC on December 12th, sponsored by the EPA in partnership with the American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute. More

     

    Save the Date- NCMS 2014 CTMA Partners Meeting May 20-22

    The 15th CTMA Annual Partners Meeting (formerly referred to as Annual Symposium) is a combination virtual and networking event.

    This year’s Partners Meeting theme is “Focused Technology Transition”” and participants will discuss methods for successfully implementing technology at maintenance facilities and to identify other technology initiatives that impact weapon system readiness.

    For more information please contact Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, (734) 995-7038.

    NCMS Launches 2014 U.S. Nanomanufacturing Survey

    NANOSurvey NCMS has partnered with the National Science Foundation under the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) to launch its latest study of commercialization trends in nanotechnology and nanofabrication– previous studies were performed in 2003, 2006 and 2009. More

    Digital Manufacturing SIG Meeting- March 5, 2014

    NCMS and its collaborative partners have identified digital manufacturing as one of the key innovations that will drive North American manufacturing competitiveness in the 21st Century. . Digital manufacturing is the dramatically intensified application of manufacturing intelligence using advanced data analytics and modeling & simulation (M&S) to produce a fundamental transformation in how we make things.

    NCMS members are invited to attend the next NCMS Digital Manufacturing Strategic Interest Group (DM SIG) meeting held at Dassault Systèmes Americas Corp. in Waltham, MA on March 5th.

    For more information please contact:
    Alissa Roath at alissar@ncms.org or Andrea Carson at andreac@ncms.org

     

    Submit Your Project Ideas to JTEG

    JTEG The purpose of the Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) is to improve coordination in the introduction of new or improved technology, new processes, or new equipment into Department of Defense Depot Maintenance Activities. JTEG seeks ways to better leverage technology improvements in depot maintenance through collaboration to support the higher DoD goals of improving effectiveness and efficiency.

    Please submit your technology ideas and projects as well as your technology needs for evaluation:  JTEG Project Ideas

     

    Member Highlights

    MDS Coating Technologies Receives 2013 R&D 100 Award

    MDS Coating Technologies Corporation (MCT) was on hand to receive the 2013
    R&D 100 Award for its BlackGold® coating technology at the black tie event in Orlando Florida. The BlackGold® coating was nominated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) as a result of the
    implementation of the coating on Delta Air Lines’ fleet. The new coating has been recognized by R&D Magazine as among the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the commercial marketplace within the past year. More

     

     

    Read More

    CTMA Connector December 2013: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
     
    RoboDayBanner
     

    December 2013

    Spotlight-Holiday_2014

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. 

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful.

    Learn more about the CTMA Program.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body. 

    Spotlight-ColdSpray_2014

    Register Now-- Cold Spray Virtual Forum, 7 January

    The Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Maintenance Policy and Programs (ODASD(MPP)) and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), in conjunction with the Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) and the Cold Spray Action Team (CSAT), are hosting a three hour virtual forum on “Cold Spray Structural Repair”. Agenda & Registration

    NCMS Team wins 2013 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award
     

    The CTMA Functional Trivalent Chrome Validation team, led by NCMS, was honored with the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award for 2013 for Small Business. The prestigious award was one of five awards presented at an official award ceremony in Washington DC on December 12th, sponsored by the EPA in partnership with the American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute. More

    NCMS Presents at the 2013 Annual Meeting & Expo of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

    Recently, Dana Ellis of NCMS West Coast Operations presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting & Expo of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, held in Bellevue, WA. Ellis’ presence at this symposium was at the request of Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock, due to NCMS’ strong participation in the iHAS (Industrial Human Augmentation System) project. More

    Lightweighting Automotive Materials Program (LAMP): Final Three Executive Reports Released

    The Lightweighting Automotive Materials Program (LAMP) proved that light materials can be strong – and easily manufactured, cost-effective, and as good (or better) than the traditional solutions. LAMP allowed participants to access MS&A tools, and develop powerful new ones, enabling an advancement of 21st Century Digital Manufacturing.  More

    BAA for Advanced Aircraft Power Systems; Fuel Technology; Aircraft Energy Conservation and Environmental Complianc

    The NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND (NAVAIR), Propulsion and Power Engineering Department, are soliciting proposal abstracts for technologies that will significantly increase the mission performance, operational capabilities, reduce the total ownership cost, and improve system readiness of Naval Air Vehicles. Solicitation Number: N68335-14-R-0018 Broad Agency Announcement (BAA). Topics include development of Advanced Aircraft Power Systems, Fuel Technology, Aircraft Energy Conservation and Environmental Compliance, and Propulsion and Power System, Condition Based Maintenance, Prognostics, Diagnostics, and Health Monitoring. Detailed information is provided in the NAVAIR publication "Guide to Naval Aviation Propulsion and Power Technology Development Programs for Fiscal Year 2013". More

     

    SpotlightLaserDeEvent_2013

    Laser Coating Removal Virtual Forum 3-4 December 2013

    On 3-4 December, 2013, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Maintenance Policy and Programs (ODASD(MPP)) and NCMS, in conjunction with the Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) hosted a virtual Laser Coating Removal Forum to share the experiences, challenges, successes, and benefits of DoD efforts to conduct laser coating removal operations. More

    Submit Your Project Ideas to JTEG

    JTEG The purpose of the Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) is to improve coordination in the introduction of new or improved technology, new processes, or new equipment into Department of Defense Depot Maintenance Activities. JTEG seeks ways to better leverage technology improvements in depot maintenance through collaboration to support the higher DoD goals of improving effectiveness and efficiency.

    Please submit your technology ideas and projects as well as your technology needs for evaluation:  JTEG Project Ideas

     

    Member Highlights

    Aspire Transitioning (Automated Process & Inspection Guide) technology to B-1

    Aspire Solutions, Inc (ASI) has been working with the Air Force and the B1 program to transform the field level mobile operating bases (MOB's) maintenance and inspection processes. The existing processes are paper based and rely heavily on the user's experience. The discrepancy data that is captured is hand written and then manually transferred into several systems, and contains little standardization among users making it difficult to perform any type of analysis without extensive data mining.

    CTMA_D2A pilot project was initiated under the SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) and CTMA (Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities) programs to field test ASI's AP&IG (Automated Process & Inspection Guide) technology. AP&IG provides visional work cards (actual pictures) that guide the user through an inspection/repair including page specific links directly to any technical orders that required. The technology also ensures standardized discrepancy data and utilizes mobile computers to provide the capability directly at the point of use. The technology was field tested at Dyess and Ellsworth AFB's. The project was a huge success and the B1 SPO (System Program Office) is working with ACC (Aircraft Central Command) out of Langley to incorporate AP&IG as part of its maintenance process for deployment to all B1 bombers. Funding for the rollout has already been obtained, and the technology is being added to portfolio management to ensure sustainment dollars are in place. Once successful the program has already been targeted for transition to the A-10.
     

    Spectro Inc. FluidScan Analyzer now ASTM D7889 Compliant

    ASTM International approved Test Method D7889, “Standard Test Method for Field Determination of In-Service Fluid properties using IR Spectroscopy.” The approval represents official confirmation that the FluidScan® handheld infrared oil analysis technology from Spectro Inc. meets ASTM guidelines for the analysis of in-service lubricants.

    The FluidScan® method provides direct, immediate measurement of multiple lubricant condition parameters via Spectro’s patented Direct Infrared Spectroscopy (DIR) technology. DIR operates without wet chemistry and requires no solvents; only one drop of oil is needed for analysis. Spectro employs FluidScan technology in its Q1000 and Q1100 portable fluid condition monitors that permit real-time, on-site evaluation of critical lubricant characteristics. More

    Invoices for 2014 Membership Dues
     

    Please watch your inbox, NCMS will be sending out invoices for 2014 membership dues by the end of the year. If you have any questions or concerns about these invoices, please contact Lori Hartung at (734)995-7061 or lorih@ncms.org.

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org) with suggestions for this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

            

    Sender Information
    To be removed from future mailings please reply with "unsubscribe all" to be removed from ALL NCMS mailings.

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    3025 Boardwalk
    Ann Arbor, MI 48108

    ©2013 National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.

    Read More

    CTMA Team wins 2013 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award

    The CTMA Functional Trivalent Chrome Validation team, led by NCMS, was honored with winning the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award for 2013 for Small Business. The prestigious award was one of five awards presented at an official award ceremony in Washington DC on December 12th, sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in partnership with the American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute.

     GreenChem-3790 Hi ResThe award recognized their work in developing a new trivalent chromium plating process to replace the highly toxic and cariogenic hexavalent chromium method of applying a functional chrome coating to aircraft and other military components. Functional hard chrome is required for heavy duty applications to achieve necessary hardness and wear resistance.

    There have been various chrome-free replacements investigated but with only partial success due to physical limitations and that preclude widespread adoption. The new trivalent chromium process is expected to be a nearly drop-in replacement for hexavalent chromium and can reduce millions of pounds of hexavalent chromium without comprising performance.

    Industry members on the team include Faraday Technology, Inc., The Boeing Company, Messier-Bugatti-Dowty, United Technologies Research Center, Advanced Tooling Corporation, CAI Resources and Chalmer Consulting. DoD activities participating on the team include FRC-East, CCAD, OO-ALC, NAVAIR Patuxent River and Anniston and AMCOM.

    The basis of the project is a new electro-deposition plating process developed by Faraday Technology. The new electro-deposition process alternates between a forward (cathodic) pulse followed by a reverse (anodic) pulse and an off period (relaxation). Not only does this process allow for thicker coatings (generally required for functional applications), but can also be adjusted to affect the structure and properties of the coating.

    The team has put the new trivalent technology through a myriad of industry and military performance tests. It must perform comparably or better than hexavalent chrome in order to proceed. After careful adjustments to the new process, test samples have shown that the new process can produce a chrome coating equivalent to hexchrome and in some cases, better. Additionally, testing has shown the new trichrome process does not produce any hexchrome as a by-product. And unlike many non-chrome technologies, the new trichrome process can plate inner and outer surfaces of a tube.

    During the 18 years of the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge program, EPA has received about 1500 nominations and presented awards to 93 technologies. Winning technologies over the lifetime of the program are responsible for reducing the use or generation of more than 826 million pounds of hazardous chemicals, saving 21 billion gallons of water, and eliminating 7.8 billion pounds of carbon dioxide equivalent releases to air.

    EPA Press Release

    Read More

    CTMA Connector November 2013: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
     
    RoboDayBanner
     

    November 2013

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. 

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful.

    Learn more about the CTMA Program.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body. 

    Additive Manufacturing (3DP) in Support of DoD Maintenance & Sustainment Virtual Workshop Video

    This virtual event was held to expand the use of additive manufacturing in support of Department of Defense (DoD) maintenance & sustainment initiatives. Topics included how the DoD, NASA, and the Department of Energy have been using this "new" technology for over two decades and how it can help solve current maintenance needs.  AGENDA  EVENT VIDEO

     

    Save the Dates- Laser Coating Removal Virtual Forum 3-4 December 2013

    A DOD forum to discuss laser de-coating technology and its application

    AGENDA

    Shared Operational Resource Tool (SORT) Team Update

    As an element of an ongoing Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) sponsored project with NATO, the NCMS SORT Industry team recently participated and demonstrated evolving solutions and concepts at the 12th NATO Codification Forum in Copenhagen, Denmark on November 6th and 7th. More than 150 attendees from all over the world traveled to this forum; many as representatives of the National Codification Bureaus of the different NATO partners, but also from non NATO Codification user nations. NCMS participant companies included Nexus, LCM, Topline Technologies and Black & Rossi, LLC with additional support of an international partner, Engisis, from Italy.

    As part of the NCMS Industry Team’s ongoing effort in support of NATO AC 327, Working Group 5, the team focused on educating the participants on practical solutions related to the use and value of UID and PLCS. 

     Leveraging work previously performed on other NCMS projects, Codification, data interoperability, and total lifecycle systems management were the concepts that the NCMS SORT team tied together at this event.

    Solutions such as Instant Parts Replacement, Data Exchange Tool, Automated Armory and Maintenance & Repair DEX were displayed. Additionally, the international partners at Engisis sponsored the “Data as a Service” concept that was jointly developed with the NEXUS team. Thru a series of static and interactive displays information was provided to attendees designed to raise awareness about the value of including UID and PLCS in Defense operations and its relationship to Codification. “

    For more information about this project contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    USMC EXLOG Update

    The NCMS Coalition Logistics Interoperability Joint Logistics Integration (CLI-JLI) team recently participated in the USMC Expeditionary Logistics Wargame VII at USMC Base Quantico to assess the interoperability of multi-national logistic systems on the battlefield. The ability to optimize the logistics supply chain of US forces with our international allies on military missions becomes critical to maintain system readiness and insure safety of soldiers in the field.

    Over 1800 personnel participated with 600 pieces of equipment from 35 partner nations to evaluate procedures to reduce redundancy in logistical assets and increase the overall interoperability for future coalition operations. A video that was provided by USMC about the wargame is available at the following link:

    http://vimeo.com/72047103

    password: wargame2013

    For more information about this project contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    Request for Information to Manufacture an Intermittent Fault Emulator

    The National Center of Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) is seeking information from interested parties for The Office of Secretary of Defense to develop an Intermittent Fault Emulator with the capability to induce a known conductive path open and/or short (discontinuity) referred to as an Intermittent fault in a circuit under test. Intermittent faults are defined as a short duration conductive path fault or discontinuity. Intermittence then recurs, at least once, at an unpredictable time interval, place, and amplitude after the previous occurrence.

    The objective of this effort is to develop a device, which will interface with diagnostic equipment and induces a conductive path fault which emulates a Line Replaceable Units (LRUs)/Weapon Replaceable Assemblies (WRAs) intermittent fault. The Intermittent Fault Emulator verifies/certifies the diagnostic equipment by generating a known fault and validating that the diagnostic equipment isolates and correctly identifies this fault. 

    The impact across the DoD resulting from the removal and replacement of LRUs/WRAs which subsequently test No Fault Found (NFF) during depot testing and are turned right around back to the field is $2 billion annually. Visual inspection is ineffective in detecting the intermittent faults that are primarily responsible for this high NFF rate. Therefore, the DoD is interested in companies who understand and can manufacture an Intermittent Fault Emulator to use as a tool to evaluate the fault detection capabilities of different Intermittent Fault Diagnostic equipment.

    For more information please contact Dana Ellis, (360) 782-1370, danae@ncms.org

    Contractor Property Management (CPM) project

    The Contractor Property Management (CPM) project made a detailed end to end study of the current Government Furnished Property (GFP) processes, taking into account the upgrades planned for the near future. The analysis included current and emerging policy, tools, and interfaces. The NCMS team was to propose, document and demonstrate enhancements to the management of GFE with the existing information systems, and identify areas for improvement in an unconstrained environment. The NCMS team worked closely with the sponsor at OSD Defense Procurement and Policy (DPAP) office, as well as the U.S. Marine Corps. The NCMS team developed and mapped several scenarios for issue and recovery of different types of property to and from contractors to understand the actors, systems, information exchange requirements and current methods to be able to map where data is created, captured and consumed by actors throughout these processes. 

    The NCMS team participated in an initial systems integration testing of Wide Area Work Flow (WAWF) and the Defense Property Accounting System (DPAS). This test included an assessment with the Marine Corps for the suitability for use in enhanced GFP management. After initial mapping of enhanced GFP processes using WAWF and DPAS, the team gained Marine Corps approval for a limited test in the production environments. The Marine Corps, with the help of DPAP and the NCMS team worked through several technical and administrative challenges with the Government systems but were successful in demonstrating the enhanced GFP management processes. The NCMS team documented the overall project, and captured the highlights in a video to be used for stakeholders and those who continue to refined GFP and related government property management processes.

    Contractor Property Management Video

    For more information about this project contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    Submit Your Project Ideas to JTEG

    JTEG The purpose of the Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) is to improve coordination in the introduction of new or improved technology, new processes, or new equipment into Department of Defense Depot Maintenance Activities. JTEG seeks ways to better leverage technology improvements in depot maintenance through collaboration to support the higher DoD goals of improving effectiveness and efficiency.

    Please submit your technology ideas and projects as well as your technology needs for evaluation:  JTEG Project Ideas

    Member Highlights

    Adapx Announces DoD Maintenance Evaluation with the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, at the 2013 AUSA Annual Meeting and Exposition

    Adapx, the leader in natural user interfaces, today announced results of a study conducted in collaboration with the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) with funding through their Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program, at the 2013 AUSA Annual Meeting and Exposition. Featured demonstrations of Adapx’s speech, sketch, and handwriting data capture solutions will be on display at booth #1540 from 21-23 October in Washington, DC. Full Press Release

    I.D. Systems Wins Contract to Deploy Wireless Industrial Vehicle Management System for U.S. Marine Corps

    I.D. Systems, Inc. (Nasdaq:IDSY), a leading provider of wireless solutions for securing, tracking and managing high-value enterprise assets, has been awarded a contract by the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) to deploy I.D. Systems' PowerFleet™ Wireless Vehicle Management System (VMS) on a fleet of material handling equipment at a U.S. Marine Corps facility in Albany, Georgia. This is the second contract I.D. Systems has executed with NCMS in the past month for a system deployment at a U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) facility. The total value of the two contracts is more than $400,000. Full Press Release

    In Memoriam- Dr. Ken Johnson

    Former NCMS executive director Dr Ken Johnson passed away earlier this month during a bicycle race in Northern Michigan. While at NCMS, Ken was involved in a number of innovative projects including additive manufacturing and long distance learning and was the principal investigator for several research and development programs sponsored through federal and state government agencies, including the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy and Department of Transportation.

    After a successful career in industry, Ken had recently returned to his alma mater Olivet Nazarene University as chair of the Department of Engineering. Under his leadership Olivet’s engineering department experienced an unparalleled spike in student enrollment. Ken also led multiple engineering service projects, including taking a team of students to Swaziland in spring 2013, where they installed a water irrigation system they had designed to help improve crop production and provide food to a community ravaged by HIV/AIDS. His latest service project was making use of a new lightweight metal alloy for missionary bicycles in world areas where transportation is difficult.

    Olivet's new engineering Tech Center has been named in his honor. 

    Olivet mourns loss of Dr. Ken Johnson, engineering chair

    Johnson's Legacy to Live On

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org) with suggestions for this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    Read More

    CTMA Connector October 2013: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
     
    RoboDayBanner
     

    October 2013

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. 

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful.

    Learn more about the CTMA Program.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body. 

    Register Now! Additive Manufacturing (3DP) in Support of DoD Maintenance & Sustainment Virtual Workshop 13 November 2013.

    A virtual event to expand the use of additive manufacturing in support of Department of Defense (DoD) maintenance & sustainment initiatives. Participate to learn how the DoD, NASA, and the Department of Energy have been using this "new" technology for over two decades and how it can help solve your maintenance needs. REGISTRATION  AGENDA

    Has Your Organization Dealt with Occupational Noise Issues?

    NCMS is asking our members and partners for input on occupational noise in the production facility. If you have successfully addressed the noise issues in your facilities either by design of the facility or the equipment itself, we’d like to know more.

    Please send any information or questions to Rebecca Taylor at rebeccat@ncms.org

    Submit Your Project Ideas to JTEG

    JTEG The purpose of the Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) is to improve coordination in the introduction of new or improved technology, new processes, or new equipment into Department of Defense Depot Maintenance Activities. JTEG seeks ways to better leverage technology improvements in depot maintenance through collaboration to support the higher DoD goals of improving effectiveness and efficiency.

    Please submit your technology ideas and projects as well as your technology needs for evaluation:  JTEG Project Ideas

    SpotlightLaserDeEvent_2013

    Save the Dates- Laser Coating Removal Virtual Forum 3-4 December 2013

    A DOD forum to discuss laster de-coating technology and its application

    AGENDA

    Project Announcements

    Development of Operational Transition Procedures and Sustainment Analysis for GCSS-MC Supply and Maintenance Functions

    An assessment and development of optimum operational procedures for supply and maintenance activities is required to maximize the benefits of GCSS-MC implementation. This project will also assess the sustainment requirements of GCSS-MC Field Supply and Maintenance Analysis functionality in order to define and provide optimum system sustainment requirements. Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) cognizant of Marine Corps supply and maintenance processes and requirements who also possess an in-depth knowledge of commercially available Oracle enterprise business systems suites of tools will assess daily operations, MEF specific standard operating procedures, FSMAO activities and shipboard exercises during the transition of GCSS-MC to field operations. This hands-on experience will enable these SMEs to adequately assess GCSS-MC maintenance and supply support functionality in order to define future improvement requirements.

    The expected result from this CTMA initiative is a smooth transition from legacy maintenance and supply data processes to GCSS-MC supported processes and to define the requirements necessary to continuously improve those processes using the GCSS-MC suite of tools.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    Wireless Command & Control System (WCCS) for Material Handling Equipment (MHE) Installation at U.S. Air Force Base Pilot Demonstration at USMC Albany Mx Center

    The Department of Defense (DoD) owns, operates and maintains thousands of industrial fleet vehicles, performing a wide range of critical logistics support tasks, including cargo, pallet and container handling, distribution center and warehousing functions, and aircraft ground support. Traditionally, industrial fleet vehicles’ maintenance schedules are based on straight calendar time or on hour meters that imprecisely reflect key time and seat time, rather than on actual motion time where most wear and tear occurs. This results in reduced operational readiness of the fleet. Installation of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) wireless fleet management hardware and software will be able to support the maintenance operations by locating equipment, tracking fleet utilization, ensuring operator accountability/planning and optimize material handling processes.

    A variation of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) wireless fleet management hardware and software will be installed on 50 industrial trucks to be identified by the U.S Air Force at an Air Force Base (AFB) to be determined. The purpose of this 60-day phase is to establish evaluation metrics relative to equipment maintenance costs, timelines and related procedures, in addition to studies for vehicle operator preventative maintenance, fleet availability, and fleet and operator productivity.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    Wireless Command & Control System (WCCS) for Material Handling Equipment (MHE) Installation at Defense Logistics Agency, Warner Robins, AFB

    Despite a myriad of major service-sponsored maintenance initiatives focused on improving maintenance automation and readiness for tactical vehicle fleets, aircraft, vessels and combat vehicles, very little has changed regarding the business process associated with maintaining, managing and improving operational readiness of the industrial vehicle fleet. For example, there is typically significant, ongoing over-maintenance of these vehicles because maintenance schedules are based on straight calendar time or on hour meters that imprecisely reflect key time and seat time, rather than on actual motion time where most wear and tear occurs. Industrial fleet vehicles tend to be a non-controlled asset with no key control or operator accountability. These vehicles are potentially available to unlicensed and/or untrained operators who are most often responsible for lost work time accidents and/or costly damage to both the vehicle and cargo/inventory within a given facility.

    A variation of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) wireless fleet management hardware and software will be installed on 50 industrial trucks to be identified by Defense Logistics at a selected site. The purpose of this 60-day phase is to establish evaluation metrics relative to equipment maintenance costs, timelines and related procedures, in addition to studies for vehicle operator preventative maintenance, fleet availability, and fleet and operator productivity.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    GCSS-MC Future Capabilities Assessment and Prioritization Initiative

    Current capability requirements documents are dated and do not reflect future operational demands anticipated by operating forces in the “new normal” as defined for the post OEF Marine Corps. The requirements documents require significant review, updating and integration; the UNS capabilities must all be evaluated for future relevancy and either integration into current programs or development as separate programs of record. Capabilities must be assessed for critical linkages and reliance.

    The expected results from this CTMA initiative are a refined identification and prioritization of logistics capabilities, applications, and systems in order to effectively and efficiently develop decision recommendations for future GCSS-MC capability integration against budget adjustments and resourcing alignment. This will be done in four (4) primary phases:
    • Capabilities vetting & modification with GCSS-MC enterprise stakeholders
    • Grouping of systems into packages of dependencies and precursors
    • Prioritization of applications/systems to develop utility values
    • Alignment of cost against prioritization in order to develop an optimization curve to influence future resourcing decisions.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Bill Chenevert, (734) 995-7989, billc@ncms.org

    Marine Corps Ground Maintenance and Sustainment Processes

    The Deputy Commandant for Installations and Logistics (DC I&L) is tasked to coordinate and improve the logistics chain continuum from requirements determination; to acquisition, manufacturing, and fielding; to sustainment within the operating forces and maintenance in the depots, and ultimately through disposal.

    The objective of this effort is to build and expand upon existing work products; develop and implement policies, processes, and procedures; facilitate requirements development and technology integration to improve maintenance, sustainment and processes across the logistics chain in support of our Marine Corps Operating Forces.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Tony Haynes, (734) 995-4930, tonyh@ncms.org

    MARFORRES Material Readiness Analysis and Logistics Information Management

    Marine Forces Reserve maintains ground equipment at 183 separate sites across the continental U.S. Property accounting and equipment visibility of these assets has proven to be a significant challenge. Continuous equipment management accountability visibility and oversight is essential to maintaining ground equipment readiness levels.

    This project will assess and enhance equipment accountability and management, identify causative factors contributing to equipment accountability and visibility (EAV) problems, identify comprehensive solutions, and implement performance improvements. This effort will improve logistics planning and support for MFR, provide the data needed to make timely and informed decisions for exercises and wartime deployments and reduce costs.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Bill Chenevert, (734) 995-7989, billc@ncms.org

    CTMA Marine Corps Logistics Portfolio – Information Technology Portfolio Baseline and Proof of Concept

    Given the current global fiscal realities, and understanding these impacts in future drawdown evolutions, the DoD has been tasked to leverage all available opportunities to 'lean out' redundant or unnecessary costs and processes. Nearly all significant military operations engaged in by the United States will be conducted jointly with the other US service components, as well as with allied international coalition partners. Developing key tools, technologies, and processes that can leverage the benefits associated with Coalition Operations will be paramount to success in challenging fiscal operational environs.

    The objective of this CTMA project is to improve the Marine Corps’ Logistics Portfolio Management Board’s (LOG PMB) ability to make data-driven investment decisions and policy enhancements resulting in more effective management of the LOG IT Portfolio.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Jeff Walker, (360) 782-1370, jeffw@ncms.org

    Master Data Management (MDM) Solution Alternatives Development

    The tremendous amount of logistics data created as a result of recent operations currently resides in the Master Data Repository (MDR). The MDR has data quality issues, is inefficiently organized and risks losing data due to a lack of a data utilization strategy and storage plan.

    This initiative will assess and develop Master Data Management (MDM) solution alternatives that will provide standardization and support quality control for core reference data. The anticipated results from this CTMA initiative will capitalize on cutting edge commercial industry capabilities to conduct a proof of concept to demonstrate an alternative to the current server based capability. Based on the results of the proof of concept an overarching strategy will be developed outlining a cohesive and comprehensive data utilization strategy.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Dana Ellis, (360) 782-1370, danae@ncms.org

    Alternate Fuel/Energy Conversion of USMC Ground Vehicles – Assessment of Benefits and Maintainability

    Currently, there are relatively limited options for alternatively powered vehicles directly from domestic original equipment manufacturers. With the minimal knowledge of the long-term benefits and concerns of alternative fuel usage, it becomes difficult to validate an alternative fuel system being a true solution.

    This initiative will focus on evaluating the utility and feasibility and maintainability of utilizing alternate energy/fuel as a power source in wheeled vehicles. This will be accomplished by converting current vehicles at the target base, tracking their performance during an evaluation period, and converting the vehicles back to their initial state at the end of the evaluation period.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    Extended Life of Lead-Acid Deep Cell Cycle Batteries Through a Planned Maintenance System

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) spent $192M in battery purchases in 2012 according to Defense Logistics Agency (DLA). One very common type of battery DoD uses is a deep cell cycle lead-acid batteries. These batteries are used in heavy equipment, such as: electric forklifts, merchandise pickers, construction vehicles, tanks, etc.

    The primary mechanism for finite battery life results when during continuous battery usage, sulfuric acid crystals form on the interior battery components. This mechanism is called battery sulfating. The rate of battery sulfating is dependent on multiple factors, but when interior battery fluids are low, the sulfating corrosion happens much more rapidly.

    The purpose of this CTMA initiative is to increase the life and reduce the total ownership cost of Deep Cell Cycle Lead-Acid Batteries to DoD through chemical de-sulfating processes.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, (734) 995-7038, debral@ncms.org

    Recently Completed CTMA Projects

    Corrective Forming of 701 Skin Panels for F-18 Overhaul

    Metal Improvement Company, a subsidiary of the Curtiss-Wright Corporation, has developed an advanced laser peening process that can be used for custom metal forming to predict the laser peening pattern, intensity and coverage required to achieve a needed shape correction in out-of-spec 701 skins. The model has been benchmarked against a rigorous set of small panel tests for which the comparison of model predictions versus measured effect have been remarkably accurate.

    IUID Data Utilization Strategy and Policy Initiative for Sense & Respond Logistics/Total Lifecycle Management

    This project took a two-pronged approach to examine several key areas in the rapidly changing logistics landscape. The first was an analysis of current Marine Corps practice and policy regarding Total Lifecycle Management and Sense & Respond Logistics with particular attention to Item Unique Identification. The second element of this project was exploration of the potential benefits to be obtained by integrating mobile computing into the logistics information infrastructure, as well as an examination of the hurdles. The benefits of the mobile computing approach were demonstrated at the Marine Corps ExLog Wargame where Marines were trained in the use of the platform. A proposed policy document was submitted suggesting future Marine Corps policy based upon the lessons derived from this project.

    Automated Process & Inspection Guide (AP&IG) – Corpus Christi Army Depot
    Pre-Shop Analysis (PSA)

    The project was unique in that it involved two pilots centered around a USAF Pave Hawk helicopter to standardize both the inspection data and processes for quality assurance and standardize pre-shop analysis evaluation data and processes. Strong bottom-line results reduced time and provided more consistent and repeatable evaluation processes.

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org) with suggestions for this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

            

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    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    3025 Boardwalk
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    ©2013 National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.

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    CTMA Connector September 2013: DoD Maintenance Update

     

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
     
    RoboDayBanner
     

    September 2013

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. 

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful.

    Learn more about the CTMA Program.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body. 

    Save the Date- Additive Manufacturing Virtual Workshop

    A virtual event to expand the use of additive manufacturing in support of Department of Defense (DoD) maintenance & sustainment initiatives. Participate to learn how the DoD, NASA, and the Department of Energy have been using this "new" technology for over two decades and how it can help solve your maintenance needs. November 13, 2013 AGENDA

    NCMS Teams Up with Marines to Optimize Warfighter Logistics

    The NCMS Coalition Logistics Interoperability Joint Logistics Integration (CLI-JLI) team recently participated in Defense Department exercise to assess the interoperability of multi-national logistic systems on the battlefield. The ability to optimize the logistics supply chain of US forces with our international allies on military missions becomes critical to maintain system readiness and insure safety of soldiers in the field.

    Over 1800 personnel participated with 600 pieces of equipment from 35 partner nations to evaluate procedures to reduce redundancy in logistical assets and increase the overall interoperability for future coalition operations.

    This exercise continues NCMS’ support of Department of Defense (DoD) efforts for logistics inter-operability including Sense and Respond Logistics (S&RL) demonstrations, technical development initiatives, technology and efforts to develop of the necessary tools required to optimize logistics. MORE

    Army Rapid Innovation Fund Broad Agency Announcement

    The goals Rapid Innovation Fund (RIF) reflect DoD’s emphasis on rapid, responsive acquisition and the engagement of small, innovative businesses in solving defense needs. The RIF is seeking projects that address innovative technology that resolve operational challenges or other critical national security needs, and has a demonstration path into a defense acquisition program, including, but not limited to capabilities that:

      • Accelerate or enhance a military capability
      • Reduce the development, acquisition, sustainment, or lifecycle costs of defense acquisition programs or fielded systems
    • R

    educe technical risk

    • Improve the timeliness and thoroughness of test and evaluation outcomes.

     MORE

    Navy Technology Insertion Program for Savings

    The Technology Insertion Program for Savings' (TIPS') mission is to increase the rate that new cutting-edge technologies are inserted into DoN Acquisition programs in order to significantly reduce operations and maintenance support costs. The program is structured to rapidly transition applicable commercial off-the-shelf solutions and late-stage development technologies from any source to meet an immediate need. TIPS provide execution year funding for a rapid start, bridging the gap until the program of record can fund the completion of the technology insertion.

    The Navy has issued a data call for new proposals under this program. Funded projects can receive up to $2M in funding for 2 year.

    Member Highlights

    Defense Logistics Agency Selects I.D. Systems to Manage Industrial Vehicles with Secure Wi-Fi Technology

    I.D. Systems, Inc., a leading provider of wireless solutions for securing, tracking and managing high-value enterprise assets, has received a contract from the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) to deploy I.D. Systems’ PowerFleet™ Vehicle Management System (VMS) on a fleet of material handling equipment at the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) facility at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), Georgia. The system is being deployed for an initial pilot phase, with the potential to expand more broadly across the DLA and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD).

    NCMS is a non-profit organization, funded in part by the DoD, that forms partnerships between the DoD and private industry under the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. NCMS facilitates development, deployment and validation of innovative commercial technologies that provide operational benefits and cost savings for DoD maintenance activities.

    Full Release

    US Navy Purchases Technology from Spectro Inc.

    Technology developed under the Fast Field Fluid Assessment Support Tools (3FAST) project was recently purchased by the U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard purchased 18 sets of Q1000 and Q3000 from Spectro.

    Spectro Product Overview (PDF)

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org) with suggestions for this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

            

    Sender Information
    To be removed from future mailings please reply with "unsubscribe all" to be removed from ALL NCMS mailings.

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    3025 Boardwalk
    Ann Arbor, MI 48108

    ©2013 National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.

    Read More

    NCMS Teams Up with Marines to Optimize Warfighter Logistics

    The NCMS Coalition Logistics Interoperability Joint Logistics Integration (CLI-JLI) team recently participated in Defense Department exercise to assess the interoperability of multi-national logistic systems on the battlefield. The ability to optimize the logistics supply chain of US forces with our international allies on military missions becomes critical to maintain system readiness and insure safety of soldiers in the field.

    Over 1800 personnel participated with 600 pieces of equipment from 35 partner nations to evaluate procedures to reduce redundancy in logistical assets and increase the overall interoperability for future coalition operations. 

    This exercise continues NCMS’ support of Department of Defense (DoD) efforts for logistics inter-operability including Sense and Respond Logistics (S&RL) demonstrations, technical development initiatives, technology and efforts to develop of the necessary tools required to optimize logistics.

    Other tools developed or used by the team include the US DoD-led NATO Support Agency (NSPA) SORT tool, Maintenance and Repair DEX, different PLCS engines (Share-A-Space; EveryPLM), and Automated Information Management Solution (AIMS) with several of the modules being targeted.

    AIMS with the Automated Armory module has shown great potential and received favorable reviews from the Marines. The system increases accuracy in tracking and issuing weapons by using current technology with scanners, bar codes, and biometric authentication to expedite the process. AIMS is currently being tested in Afghanistan.

    Capt. Dave McGrath, operations officer for Marine Wing Support Squadron 274, out of Cherry Point, N.C., which participated in the exercise, said he planned to ask for the system for his unit before the week was out.

    “For all 530 of my Marines, to issue their weapons would probably take me two days,” McGrath said. “This can do it in an hour.”

    The team previously performed proof of concept testing with other tools in Europe at the NATO exercise Coalition Warrior Interoperability Exercise (CWIX) at the Joint Forces Training Center (JFTC) in Bydgoszcz, Poland in June 2012. Logistical data was exchanged between the United States, France, Italy, Germany, Finland, the UK MoD British Army and the NATO (NSPA) Shareable Operational Resource Tool.

    This NCMS project team continues work it efforts to provide US forces and their allies the ability to pool supply chain information including maintenance and repair data. The result will help reduce redundancy and streamline logistical support functions while generating data that will be used to further improve system readiness and reduce cost for all participating nations.

    Read More

    CTMA Connector August 2013: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    RoboDayBanner

    August 2013

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities.

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful.

    Learn more about the
    CTMA Program.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    WATCH the Website

    Plans are developing for an Additive Manufacturing Virtual
    Workshop for this Fall. The date has been set for September 21, please check
    www.ncms.org for a additional details. This VTC meeting will highlight successful
    applications and repair capabilities currently in place at many of the depots as
    a result of their participation on the CTMA RARE project to stimulate adoption
    and deployment across the entire DoD.

    Project Announcements

    Advanced Mobile
    Electrical Fault Detection and Isolation Tester (AMEFDIT) for All Aircraft
    Sub-Systems

    The project will demonstrate the benefits from using an advanced mobile tester
    over existing large circuit analyzers used in depot maintenance. The sub-systems
    to be used for this project will be chosen in conjunction with U.S. Air Force
    C130 AFMC AFLCMC/WLNEA. Since the technology and processes used for this project
    are a new standard from conventional practices, the project will be executed
    collaboratively between U.S. Air Force personnel and the technology solution
    provider.

    The project will be limited to one depot facility with the U.S. Air Force
    selecting 2 subsystems, with existing data from previous deployment using
    conventional ATE and handheld testers which will provide available data to make
    the comparison. The objectives are to ensure all of the electrical testing
    requirements of depot level are met and to compare its efficiency with current
    legacy maintenance programs on C130 aircraft in a depot environment.
    Additionally, in a limited scope, the project will also explore the potential
    for O-level maintenance on the same C130 aircraft sub-system.

    Hence, the proposed work permits performance assessment of the test equipment,
    documents the costs savings in procurement of test solutions (interface cables
    and test programs) and operational time savings in using mobile equipment at
    both the depot and operational level. At the depot level, the time required to
    develop depot solutions is expected to be reduced from its current timeframe of
    6-12 months, down to just one week, and the maintenance time is expected to be
    reduced by 75%, with an average of 45-minutes per subsystem.

    At the operational maintenance level, this project is expected to provide an
    assessment of new capabilities provided by the proposed technology for
    troubleshooting faults and reduce maintenance turnaround time to hours, as
    opposed to days, weeks or months when it comes to electrical failure.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Tony
    Haynes, (734) 995-4930, tonyh@ncms.org

    Marine Corps Financial Improvement and Audit Readiness
    (FIAR) of Operating Materials and Supplies (OM&S)

    The Deputy Commandant for Installations and Logistics (DC I&L) is tasked to
    coordinate and improve the logistics chain continuum from requirements
    determination; to acquisition, manufacturing, and fielding; to sustainment
    within the operating forces and maintenance in the depots, and ultimately
    through disposal. Integral to accomplishing these tasks is improving equipment
    accountability across the Marine Corps. The DC I&L is also charged with
    leveraging commercial best practices and tools whenever appropriate and in the
    best interest of the Marine Corps. In order to comply with these directives, DC
    I&L requires a comprehensive assessment of Financial Improvement and Audit
    Readiness (FIAR) enablers currently in use and an thorough understanding of the
    potential to improve FIAR process outcomes via the adoption of best commercial
    practices and technologies.

    The objective of this effort is to perform in-depth analysis of mission critical
    asset audit readiness and supplemental support processes and technologies and to
    identify potential corrective action plans that would improve financial
    management processes and technologies that leverage commercial best practices
    and tools.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Tony
    Haynes, (734) 995-4930, tonyh@ncms.org

    Member Highlights

    MDS Coating Technologies Corporation
    (MCT), Recognized with R&D 100 Award

    MDS Coating Technologies Corporation (MCT), was recognized for their work in
    developing an erosion-resistant nanocoating.

    During aircraft operation, gas turbine engines are
    continuously exposed to erosive media that damage engine components.
    Nanostructured coatings applied to compressor airfoil surfaces can significantly
    reduce material loss, leading to improved engine performance and fuel
    efficiency. Researchers at MCT have designed an erosion-resistant nanocoating
    material and application process, which significantly reduces erosion of
    compressor airfoils. MCT teamed with scientists and engineers at NETL and Delta
    Air Lines to perform critical tests required for FAA certification needed to
    deploy the protective coating on commercial aircraft. The FAA-approved
    nanocoating has the potential to save the U.S. commercial aviation industry up
    to 100 million gallons of fuel annually and realize cost savings greater than
    $300 million per year at today’s jet fuel prices.

    The R&D 100 Awards have identified game-changing technologies across a diverse
    range of scientific disciplines including telecommunications, biotechnology,
    software, high-energy physics, diagnostics, and manufacturing. Winning
    technologies that have moved into the public sector included the digital
    wristwatch, antilock brakes, the automated teller machine, the halogen lamp, the
    fax machine, the NicoDerm® anti-smoking patch, and HDTV.



    Full Release

    Pendaran Job Training Highlighted by
    Bloomberg Business Week

    Pendaran's innovative job training program is held at NCMS headquarters in Ann
    Arbor, Michigan. The program can also be taken onsite to customers if desired.
    One customer says, “I’ve just never seen anything like this...It systematically
    destroys every bad instinct you have.” Learn more about the program in the
    following excerpt and article.

    "...He has been forced to give up his identity as part of a
    novel worker-training program conceived by Hossein Nivi, an Iranian-born
    mechanical engineer and 25-year Ford (F) veteran. In his last role at the
    carmaker, Nivi developed a worker-training simulation in which trainees work at
    a calamitous, pretend factory and try to accomplish tasks while actors strive to
    make life horrible. Seven years ago, he set up Pendaran to sell his brand of
    worker-training to the broader corporate world."



    Inside a Job-Training Program That's Just Hellacious Enough to Get Results

    Recently Completed CTMA
    Projects:

    Catapult Alignment Position Measurement Automation
    Catapult alignment is complex, time consuming, and an expensive procedure. The
    project challenge was to develop an integrated solution that addressed each
    limitation of the current process. Successful demonstration of a laser tracking
    method is now expected to become the standard alignment technique for naval
    ships in the future.

    Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy (DPAP) Program Development and
    Implementation (PDI) Support

    Support was provided to the OUSD in their multi-faceted effort to improve
    business processes in the DoD. The overall objective was to examine the data
    structures and processes that support essential programs, procedures and
    policies providing accountability, visibility and interoperability among and
    between government agencies, industrial partners and international allies.

    Enabling Interoperability in a NATO Environment – Maintenance and Repair
    Activities

    The goal of this project was to build and test (in a live environment), a system
    that can facilitate logistics interoperability among and between coalition
    partners. Commercial off-the-shelf tools were enhanced to facilitate the sharing
    of maintenance and supply data across the enterprise between coalition allies.

    Electrical Wire Integrity System (EWIS) II at USMC Maintenance Center
    Barstow, CA

    Wiring-based systems are the fundamental backbone that supports today’s vital
    communication, weapons system and related asset control functions. Specific to
    Barstow, EWIS tools were provided and software developed to test electrical
    systems for the M1114 Humvee.

    Fast Field Fluid Assessment Support Tools (3FAST) – Phases I – III
    The joint collaborative project was established in order to supply specifically
    a handheld infrared spectrometer with an integrated viscometer reporting
    kinematic viscosity at a fixed temperature. The project resulted in successful
    deployment of two handheld products for the analysis of fluid condition and
    contamination properties of lubricants and some fuels.

    Joint Maintenance Enterprise Interoperability
    Successful modern logistics depend upon information technology (IT). The various
    Service components, departments and organizations with the DoD have embraced IT
    to achieve the many individual goals of each. In order for these programs to
    reach their maximum benefit particularly in the joint environment, IT
    applications must become interoperable across platforms, Services components,
    nations and industrial partners. This project pursued meaningful steps toward
    enabling that necessary interoperability.

    Multi-Axis Simulation Table Environmental Enclosure (MASTEE)
    The U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC)
    had in its Physical Simulation Laboratory (PSL) a Multi-Axis Simulation Table
    (MAST) capable of emulating shock and vibration conditions at levels exceeding
    anticipated OCO conditions. It did not, however, have an integrated
    environmental chamber capable of fully emulating the environment. This project
    was launched to correct that deficiency. The Multi-Axis Simulation Table
    Environmental Enclosure (MASTEE) designed is roughly a six foot cube, designed
    to hold complete electronics systems and test them under extremes of
    environment, vibration, and shock.

    Shareable Operational Resources Tool (SORT)
    When U.S. and Allied Forces deploy to operations and exercises,
    additional/redundant equipment and sustainment items are continually deployed
    with little ability to cross-service support from friendly forces in theatre.
    The Shareable Operational Resource Tool (SORT) provides a web-based capability
    for facilitating coalition planning, execution and drawdown for shared
    visibility of offered national items and services.

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org) with suggestions for this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2013

    Sender Information
    To be removed from future mailings please reply with "unsubscribe all" to be removed from ALL NCMS mailings.

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    3025 Boardwalk
    Ann Arbor, MI 48108

    ©2013 National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.

    Read More

    CTMA Connector July 2013: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    CTMABanner
       

     

    July 2013

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. 

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful.

    Learn more about the CTMA Program.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body. 

     

    CTMA Annual Partners Meeting

    The 14th CTMA Annual Partners Meeting (formerly referred to as Annual Symposium) was a combination virtual and networking event. This event was held over a two and half day period on 21-23 May. Speaker videos and presentations are now available embedded in the “Fast Track to Collaboration” online program. Over 25 DoD facilities participated with industry to discuss methods for successfully implementing maintenance technology. Conference participants can provide feedback via the Event Survey.

     

    Project Announcements

    Maintenance and Supply Accountability and Process Efficiencies- Operational Improvement for GCSS-MC
    This initiative focuses on the manifested challenges of the Global Combat Support System Marine Corps (GCSS-MC) in the post implementation phase, and will improve asset maintenance and supply accountability by increasing asset visibility with a focus on equipment maintenance status and condition for the warfighter. Additionally the end user of GCSS-MC and the larger Logistics community will have an improved capability and understanding of the system. The goal is to address timely maintenance and increase the efficient allocation of maintenance resources (people, process and tools) necessary to increase the overall readiness posture of Marine Corps assets. This will be accomplished by assessing GCSS-MC functionality, tools and processes in order to identify and recommend courses of action for rectifying issues with the IT system, developing policies and procedures, and supplementing training and education programs that will enhance the end user experience within GCSS-MC. These actions will provide Supply and Maintenance SME’s to the Operations Advisory Groups (OAG) and Marine Forces  (MARFORS). This will require in-depth GCSS-MC Oracle knowledge, expert knowledge in Marine Corps Supply and Maintenance business processes, and a strategic understanding of the full range of stakeholders impacted by the modernization effort.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, (734) 995-7038.

    IUID Enabled Workscope Optimization
    In 2006, the USAF T56 engine Program Office implemented a Workscope Cost Optimizing Tool (WCOT)™. The success of the program in improving T56 reliability has been directly tied to the quantity and quality of data collected. Unfortunately, the Workscope Cost Optimization Tool™ is data-intensive that for the most part, must be manually entered not only at the depot, but also at Intermediate Repair sites. Manual data collection creates a significant probability of errors and it is expensive and time consuming to maintain.

    Under this project, a new means of collecting engine component reliability data through UID (unique identifier) means will be piloted. Specifically, this project will simulate the use of UIDs on engine parts, measure the time savings associated with the use of UID vs. manual collection of engine data as well as measure and compare the error rates of manually and UID collected data sets. If appropriate, a business case for the widespread adoption of UID will be developed as the result of the pilot as a way to improve data quality and reduce the cost of data collection.

    The work will be accomplished on engines that are using the workscoping tools currently within the AMC and AFSOC Commands. UID data will be downloaded directly into the USAF’s reliability MIDCS data base at each event. This will prevent the need for USAF personnel to document the component details at each removal event.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org,(734) 995-7038.

    Increased Reliability of Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) Systems
    The US Department of Defense (DoD) routinely performs overhauls, modifications, scheduled maintenance and unscheduled maintenance at various operational locations. The speed and efficiency with which these tasks are accomplished is critical to our national security, and has a direct impact on operational costs. This initiative will develop new and improved techniques to utilize software and hardware tools to improve the reliability of Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) Systems for two rotary wing aircraft used extensively in the Army.

    By developing a simple and reliable testing system for electrical components, harness interfaces and electronics components, the DoD can avoid costs by enabling field operations to quickly spot problems and to fix them, thus avoiding false component exchanges and higher levels of no-faults found.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Steve Hale, steveh@ncms.org, (734) 995-2195.

    Shareable Operational Resources Tool (SORT) Phase II- Operational Enhancements and Demonstration
    The Shareable Operational Resources Tool (SORT) was developed initially to demonstrate the benefits of merging “Product” level data through its NATO (or National) Stock Number (NSN) or Reportable Item Code (RIC), and “Item” level data using Item Unique Identification (IUID) as a means to provide visibility of common or shareable resources between forces within a contingency operation. Due to funding limitations in Phase I, SORT functionality has fallen somewhat short of upgrades incorporated into a commercial product called dSORT (deployable SORT).

    Although SORT has high-level backing, it has yet to be embraced during operational planning and execution. SORT II is designed to address this issue by integrating SORT coincident with various standard logistics information systems and processes and to demonstrate its capability via live exercises with multinational participation, as well as at the command planning level (CPX) and live forces (LIVEX).

    Expected benefits include both improved capability and awareness of SORT as a means to implement Multinational Logistics capabilities in exercises and Contingency Operations thus reducing deployed footprint requirements, strategic lift, and demand for high-priority shipment of items into theater when they exist outside of the traditional supply chain.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, (734) 995-7038.

    T700 Joint Field Service Evaluation Plan
    The T700-GE-401C engine are jointly operated in all military services, powering H-60, AH-64 and AH1 aircraft. These types of aircraft are operated in both erosive and maritime environments. These austere operating environments degrade compressor airfoil condition and performance.

    The purpose of this project is to jointly develop the engineering change required for coating imple¬mentation of compressor blades. This project will leverage ongoing joint initiatives currently evaluating engine compressor Erosion/Corrosion Resistance Coating (EC/RC) for increased durability, with extensions to field testing and evaluations. This effort complements NAVAIR’s activity as joint service lead to explore the benefits of ER/CR on the H-60 helicopter and to qualify this coating on T700 engine components used by the services.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, (734) 995-7038.

    Joint Intermittence Testing (JIT) Capability
    The Military Services are currently challenged by detecting and isolating faults in aircraft wiring cables and avionics line replaceable units (LRU). These faults include opens and shorts, degraded and intermittent signals, and insulation degradation. The magnitude of the challenge is daunting with the DoD spending approximately $2 billion annually just removing and replacing LRUs that when tested, reveal no fault found (NFF). Several newer technologies address the identification and isolation of electrical faults in weapon systems, including intermittent faults. However, there is no defined requirement for detecting and isolating intermittent faults and no test validation process for assessing the capabilities of intermittent detection and isolation devices offered by industry.

    The objective of this Logistic Initiative Fund (LIF) CTMA initiative is to leverage the Joint Service Wiring Action Group (JSWAG) to develop and publish a Joint Service Intermittence Testing requirement for appropriate electronic equipment. This initiative will also identify and validate test methods needed to ensure that intermittence test equipment can perform to joint specification parameters. As part of this initiative, a device will be developed to induce an intermittent fault which will interface with COTS diagnostic equipment. Once the intermittent fault simulation device is developed, two commercially available suppliers of test equipment will be used to validate the simulation device.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Dana Ellis,
    danae@ncms.org, (360) 782-1370.

    Model Based Definition for Aircraft Launch, Recovery, and Support Equipment
    Model Based Definition (MBD) uses 3D digital data (such as solid models and associated metadata) within three-dimensional (3D) Computer Aided Design (CAD) software to provide specifications for individual components and product assemblies as opposed to utilizing conventional two-dimensional (2D) drawings. The Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in Lakehurst, NJ is the center of excellence for Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment (ALRE) as well as Naval Aviation Support Equipment (SE). Engineers at the facility are constantly supporting fleet maintenance activities with the design of replacement parts and new maintenance equipment. In the current environment, engineering designs use 3D software. Although these designs are constructed in 3D, they are converted into 2D engineering drawings for prototype/production. When manufacturing and inspecting these items, only the 2D drawings are used. Currently the technology exists to manufacture and inspect directly from the 3D data, however, many challenges still exist.

    The proposed solution is to partner with industry leaders to formulate a MBD based Technical Data Package (TDP). The TDP will consist of engineering drawing formats which are compatible with the existing 3D PDF (PRC) solution and embedding SETP files into these PDF files. A comparison of the PRO/E models with the new PRC and SETP model files will be conducted to ensure that they define an identical geometry.

    Private industry already uses MBD and has shown that significant cost reductions can be achieved. Although private industry offers a significantly different operation scenario, many lessons can be learned from their experiences.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Dana Ellis,
    danae@ncms.org, (360) 782-1370.

    2D/3D Data Model Collaboration between FRC Southwest, FRC East, and FRC Southeast
    Current aircraft procured by NAVAIR are designed and fabricated utilizing state-of-the-art technology consisting of computer aided design, computer aided engineering, and computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM/CAE). The design definition of these aircraft are created and delivered as 3D solid model based definition in electronic media. The current state of technology used within the Fleet Readiness Centers (FRCs) makes it impossible for the responsible agencies to provide effective sustainability. This is especially true once the aircraft are deployed to the fleet due to the lack of infrastructure (to host, maintain, control, archive, manage, and utilize these models). Additionally, there is excessive variation in the quality of the solid models. Each data set acquired from the OEMs requires a data healing process. This problem is common at all FRCs.

    Finally, the FRCs need a capability in place to facilitate essential 3D data management practices. The current capability forces each local engineering support activity to translate the 3D data back to 2D blueprint-type paper-based instructions for the depot level maintainers to perform their work. The lack of a comprehensive configuration managed solution that can accommodate the Manufacturing Model Management System (3MS) process (developed at FRC Southwest) has caused a large number of parts to be scrapped or reworked.

    The project team proposes a solution that will enable users at FRC Southeast and FRC East to access engineering and manufacturing information from the FRC Southwest via web interface. Each location will be able to utilize configuration controlled data generated by a range of technologies for acquiring the “as-is” condition for aircraft that enter the NAVAIR depot environment.

    The solution will provide a collaborative environment for maintenance and repair activities between the depots. Data from the new environment will be formatted and managed to allow a team of users to access, visualize, collaborate, manipulate, and conference using engineering information, (2D and 3D) in a secure and traceable way.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Dana Ellis,
    danae@ncms.org, (360) 782-1370.

    Industrial Human Augmentation System Prototype Re-Design for Affordability
    This technology addresses the problem of high Total Ownership Cost (TOC) of DoD assets including U.S. Navy Carriers, Surface Ships and Submarines. Labor represents the majority of costs associated with the construction, maintenance, repair and disposal of DoD assets. Technological advances are needed to reduce TOC through increased productivity, improved quality, and a reduction in the costs associated with worker injuries. Exoskeleton-based human augmentation can remove most of the human strain while using hand-tools during construction, maintenance, repair and disposal of DoD assets. This will increase productivity and quality while decreasing injury rates, thus significantly reducing TOC. Although applicable through the entire lifecycle of DoD assets, this technology is initially directed at depot level maintenance and repair tasks, specifically, grinding, blasting, needle-gunning, sawzalls, using heat induction units, hydro-lancing, and painting.

    The Navy tested an initial prototype of the Industrial Human Augmentation System (iHAS) for two weeks at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF) in November 2012. This re-design effort will help identify the requirements that must be included in a DoD procurement specification, leading to a draft Purple iHAS Procurement Specification being delivered as part of this effort. The MANTIS must be re-designed for affordability before it will be affordable for use in the Naval Shipyards and military depot markets. The Design for Affordability effort must take into consideration all aspects of the system design, as well as all aspects of the products lifecycle. The system needs to be optimized for cost, safety, weight, comfort, mobility and flexibility.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Dana Ellis,
    danae@ncms.org, (360) 782-1370.

    ZeroG Arm Technology to Transfer to DoD Depots to Reduce Injuries and Reduce the Cost of Maintenance
    Some industrial tools, such as heat induction units, grinders, blasters, and water lances employed for corrosion control, remediation, and other uses, are often heavy or awkward to use at DoD depots. These factors limit productivity and impact quality as workers need frequent rest and stretch breaks as a result of the efforts in using these heavy tools, and from applications that require uncomfortable contortions of the worker’s body. These factors also limit the worker’s allowable tool weight.

    Productivity and quality of corrosion prevention and control tasks at depots could be increased by implementing applications of zeroG (mechanical arm) arm systems to reduce injuries and increase productivity.

    Equipois Inc. produces a series of unpowered arms (zeroG) that allow tools, parts and other payloads to be maneuvered as if weightless, but with complete freedom of motion. By making the tools effectively weightless, the technology can boost productivity, reduce injuries, and improve quality. These commercially available systems are already employed by the automotive, commercial aerospace, and defense industries.

    This project will assess the impact of the zeroG on worker health and productivity. The scope of the test will depend on a specific application for the depot to improve productivity for example; waterjet hand lance, overhead grinding, media blasting. Each depot will assess safety, health, productivity benefits and prioritize operations uses with the highest return on investment.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Dana Ellis,
    danae@ncms.org, (360) 782-1370.

    Reducing Opacity Using an Alternative “Green” Cutting Fuel MagneGas & Cold Cutting Technology at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility
    Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF) is the U.S. Navy’s designated site for breaking and recycling nuclear-powered ships and submarines. In 2008, PSNS & IMF received a Notice of Violation (NOV) for exceeding the Puget Sound Clean Air Act (PSCAA) 20% Opacity Limit while using the no longer available methyl acetylene propadiene (MAPP) gas for metal cutting. The main generator of visible particulate matter (PM) emissions was identified as oxy-fuel torching, the site’s primary metal cutting technology. PSNS & IMF has since been searching for alternative or modification technologies to bring its shipbreaking and recycling operations under compliance. PSNS & IMF was the first organization to actively address the need for opacity reduction during metal-cutting operations.

    The ships are much larger than the submarines and cannot be contained by the currently installed enclosures, the short-term emergency remedy invested by the site. It is expected that all cutting on ships must be performed outside. Therefore, the advantage of zero emission is needed immediately in order to ensure no violation of opacity limit during the first stages of dismantling the ships.

    This project evaluates a cold cutting technology during shipbreaking and repair operations intended to reduce particulate opacity to less than 20% while maintaining worker safety and production schedules.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Dana Ellis,
    danae@ncms.org, (360) 782-1370.

    Automated Intensifier Measurement System (AIMS-II) Correlation Upgrade
    The Automated Intensifier Measurement System (AIMS) is a full automated test set which has the ability to replace outdated manual test equipment currently in use by government and industry. Image intensifier tubes are the main electro-optic component in night vision devices. Current test methods rely on manual measurements made by highly-trained operators in temperature-controlled dark rooms. This process is inefficient, and correlation of results between the government and industry has been problematic as well, resulting in reduced readiness and unnecessary disposal of expensive units.

    The AIMS is a NIST-traceable, calibratable, electro-optic machine vision system developed by the Penn State Electro-Optics Center with support from government entities. It produces rapid, automated, quantifiable and reproducible results on all of the primary image intensifier tube inspections. AIMS is a self-contained, temperature-controlled test set capable of calibration and operation in normal factory light levels.

    Upgrades to the basic AIMS system are required to enable its potential use by the government as the standard for primary inspections consistent with the MIL-SPEC, to significantly increase readiness of night vision devices for the warfighter, reduce test times and cost, reduce destruction of good image intensifier tubes, and reduce backlog of new tube purchases, with large cost savings.

    The proposed solution is to accomplish upgrades to the basic AIMS system and assist the government in performing a correlation evaluation on the upgraded AIMS system.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Michael Fancher,
    michaelf@ncms.org, (360) 782-1370.

    Digital Pen and Paper for Capturing Maintenance Data
    Data is invariably captured during the maintenance process with pen and paper. The reasons are many and varied, but often involve ease of use, ease of training, and ruggedness of the tools (pens) and artifacts (paper). However, data taken on paper needs to be rekeyed into information systems, with potential for introducing errors, and information that may be important may be lost, such as the time when the data was written. Many attempts have been made to create a solution for computerized maintenance documentation, but often they are rejected by the end users as inappropriate to the situation (e.g., use by individuals who have grease on their hands). The costs associated with creating a rugged computing solution appropriate to maintenance activities are often prohibitive. In most DoD maintenance centers, information technology infrastructure is limited in production environments and in most settings the use of wireless transmission is not allowed.

    The proposed solution is to evaluate and potentially enable adoption of COTS digital pen and paper technology. Digital pen and paper technology enables a user to continue to employ his/her standard forms and work processes, with minimal retraining. The user would employ a pen that records the data being written on paper that has been printed on site with a microscopic pattern of dots. The pen can transmit the data via Bluetooth or via docking at a depot computer. Because each piece of paper is unique, and the pen knows precisely which piece of paper it is writing on, the user can fill out any form at any time, alternating among them as s/he pleases.

    In an effort to take advantage of new technology to reduce the overall cost of maintenance, members of the Advanced Aircraft Technology Integrated Program Team at NAVAIR’s Fleet Readiness Center Southwest will deploy and test a digital pen and paper solution based on the Adapx, Inc., Capturx COTS product line, which derives from DARPA SBIR work in 2002-2004. Adapx’s Capturx line of products coordinates the production of digital paper forms and drawings, as well as the unloading of the digital ink and its interpretation and entry into backend data systems. The NAVAIR/Industry team will perform a controlled study of the benefits/drawbacks from using the digital pen/paper solution in a case study of maintenance in support of the Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet Aircraft High Flight Hour program which calls for in depth inspection of a variety of critical locations. This evaluation project in a DoD depot thus will leverage previous R&D to further transition this technology into wider DoD use and benefit.

    NCMS members interested in participating in this project should contact Michael Fancher,
    michaelf@ncms.org, (360) 782-1370.

    Automated Rotor Blade Stripping System (ARBSS) Enhancement
    The ARBSS deployed in 2009 was designed with legacy lasers which have subsequently proven to have reliability issues. FRC East has designated CIP funds in FY2014 to replace the lasers but there are other modifications to the system that can improve system performance prior to laser replacement. This project will bring ARBSS fully online in FY2013 for immediate cost reduction and demonstration of reliable performance and support qualification of the process for V-22 and H-1 coatings and substrate materials.

    At a presentation at FRC East in late 2012, engineers from the FRC East Vertical Lift Center of Excellence (VLCE) and NAVAIR Patuxent River summarized the potential benefits and cost savings that could be derived from the use of an ARBSS for helicopter maintenance. Benefits include worker safety, morale, labor costs, environmental impacts, production consistency, greater throughput, elimination of touch labor, and damage reduction. For the planned V-22 workload at FRC East, the presentation concluded that the “Depot/DoD can save millions of dollars in turnaround time, man/labor hours, energy cost, and avoid damaging/scraping of the blades.”

    The NCMS Contact is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, (734) 995-4930.

     

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Tony Haynes (tonyh@ncms.org) with suggestions for this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2013

     

            

     

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    CTMA Project- 2D/3D Data Model Collaboration between FRC Southwest, FRC East, and FRC Southeast

    Current aircraft procured by NAVAIR are designed and fabricated utilizing state-of-the-art technology consisting of computer aided design, computer aided engineering, and computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM/CAE). The design definition of these aircraft are created and delivered as 3D solid model based definition in electronic media. The current state of technology used within the Fleet Readiness Centers (FRCs) makes it impossible for the responsible agencies to provide effective sustainability. This is especially true once the aircraft are deployed to the fleet due to the lack of infrastructure (to host, maintain, control, archive, manage, and utilize these models). Additionally, there is excessive variation in the quality of the solid models. Each data set acquired from the OEMs requires a data healing process. This problem is common at all FRCs.

    Finally, the FRCs need a capability in place to facilitate essential 3D data management practices. The current capability forces each local engineering support activity to translate the 3D data back to 2D blueprint-type paper-based instructions for the depot level maintainers to perform their work. The lack of a comprehensive configuration managed solution that can accommodate the Manufacturing Model Management System (3MS) process (developed at FRC Southwest) has caused a large number of parts to be scrapped or reworked.

    The project team proposes a solution that will enable users at FRC Southeast and FRC East to access engineering and manufacturing information from the FRC Southwest via web interface. Each location will be able to utilize configuration controlled data generated by a range of technologies for acquiring the “as-is” condition for aircraft that enter the NAVAIR depot environment.

    The solution will provide a collaborative environment for maintenance and repair activities between the depots. Data from the new environment will be formatted and managed to allow a team of users to access, visualize, collaborate, manipulate, and conference using engineering information, (2D and 3D) in a secure and traceable way.

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    CTMA Annual Partners Event Videos and Presentations Now Available

    The 14th CTMA Annual Partners Meeting (formerly referred to as Annual Symposium) was a combination virtual and networking event which was held over a two and half day period on 21-23 May.

    Videos of the speakers along with the presentations are now available via embedded links in this version of the event program:

    SpotlightCTMA13h

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    CTMA Connector April 2013: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
     
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    April 2013

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input.

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    CTMA Annual Partners Meeting Update

    The 14th CTMA Annual Partners Meeting (formerly referred to as Annual Symposium) is a combination virtual and networking event.  This year’s Partners Meeting theme is “Fast Track to Collaboration” and participants will discuss methods for successfully implementing technology at maintenance facilities and to identify other technology initiatives that impact weapon system readiness.

    A Deputy Commanders Panel is scheduled for Tuesday, 21 May commencing 1415. The panel session will include an in depth discussion surrounding the increasing pressures to sustain the fleet at less cost. Panel members will discuss how emerging technologies can help their operations.

    Also in light of the recent DoD guidance, it is clear that the relevance and importance of innovative technology solutions has dramatically increased. Technology solutions will help enable the military Services to smartly defer maintenance without assuming undue risk and drive further efficiency into current maintenance processes to help maximize the effectiveness of greatly reduced maintenance resources.

    Live keynote addresses and panel discussions will be via video-conference with rebroadcast over the internet to anyone registering for the event. Participants can tune-in to the meeting based on their interests in the agenda.  Industry and local DoD personnel are invited to join us at NCMS in Ann Arbor for the Annual Partners Meeting. Project teams will be showcased during the meeting, and each team will have 30 minutes to either present their technology or conduct a demonstration for broadcast to participants throughout the sustainment community.

    Agenda and Registration information

     

    Announcing the winner of the 2013 $100,000 CTMA Maintenance Challenge

    Industrial Human Augmentation System Prototype Re-Design for Affordability (Lockheed Martin, NAVSEA 04X)

    The problem this technology addresses is the high Total Ownership Cost (TOC) of DoD assets including U.S. Navy Carriers, Surface Ships and Submarines. Labor represents the majority of costs associated with the construction, maintenance, repair and disposal of DoD assets. Technological advances are needed to reduce TOC’s through increased productivity, improved quality, and a reduction in the costs associated with worker injuries. Exoskeleton-based human augmentation can remove most of the human strain while using hand-tools during construction, maintenance, repair and disposal of DoD assets. This will increase productivity and quality while decreasing injury rates, thus significantly reducing TOC's. Although applicable through the entire life cycle of DoD assets, this technology is initially directed at depot level maintenance and repair tasks, specifically, grinding, blasting, needle-gunning, sawzalls, using heat induction units, hydro-lancing, and painting.

    A two-week iHAS productivity evaluation was successfully conducted at PSNS & IMF. Five test subjects used a low heat induction tool to remove SHT tiles and SHT tile residue from various locations on a submarine hull. The workers performed this task both non-augmented and with an iHAS.

    The evaluation produced compelling results:

    1. Testing indicated a high potential for significant team productivity improvements, as the iHAS enabled a two-worker team to equal the production of a three-worker team that does not utilize an iHAS.

    2. Quantitative data suggests that iHAS improves overall individual productivity by demonstrating the potential to improve operational productivity by reducing the heat induction crew size of three to two, a 50% improvement. Currently operators rotate positions to avoid fatigue, but operators using the iHAS will not experience fatigue, will have greater endurance, and avoid the need to rotate positions as often.

    3. Qualitative data suggests iHAS improves worker ergonomics and significantly reduces worker fatigue.

    4. The iHAS performed effectively in a wide array of work environments (unstable footing, scaffolding, loose impediments, rain, wind, cold, etc.).

    Using the MANTIS benefitted PSNS & IMF by reducing the required crew size from three to two, equating to a cost savings of $104K per year for one single operation, using a Heat Induction Tool to remove tiles. These savings will increase exponentially as iHAS units are deployed throughout the DoD industrial base and maintenance, repair and disposal depots and shipyards, with the units being utilized on many different tasks across the DoD Services.

    Interested in participation, contact Dana Ellis, danae@ncms.org, 360-782-1370. 

     

    Thanks as well to all the other submissions, some of which will also be funded:

    Digital Pen and Paper for Capturing Maintenance Data (ADAPx, FRCSW)

    The user would employ a pen that records the data being written on paper that has been printed on site with a microscopic pattern of dots. The pen can transmit the data via Bluetooth or via docking at a depot computer. Because each piece of paper is unique, and the pen knows precisely which piece of paper it is writing on, the user can fill out any form at any time, alternating among them as s/he pleases.

    Automated Process & Inspection Guide (AP&IG) for B1 Bomber at Tinker, Dyess, & Ellsworth Air Force Bases (Aspire Solutions)

    The team would utilize AP&IG (Automated Process & Inspection Guide) to automate the existing manual, paper based maintenance and inspection operations. AP&IG standardizes these processes by providing detailed guided work flows using actual pictures that walk the mechanic/inspector thru a set of procedures.

    Product Life Cycle Management for Aircraft Sustainment and Support (FRCE, Dassault)

    The team proposes a solution to enable users to access engineering, maintenance and logistics information that is required for maintenance in a common environment. This will provide users with the capability to bridge gaps between the fleet and the FRC, FRC to FRC, and internal to the FRC. The solution will provide the ability to capture and utilize complex data in a native state generated by a range of technologies and configuration management tools.

    The Application of Laser Metal Deposition as a Repair and Remanufacturing Process for the Wear Surfaces of High Value Components (Focus Hope Industries)

    All military vehicles (land, sea, and air) have rotating metal components (e.g. wheel spindles, engine cam shafts, or pump shafts) which exhibit wear, damage, and/or corrosion during their regular service life. When the damage reaches the extent that the relative vehicle systems’ performance is or will be affected these worn parts are typically replaced with new parts and the old part is relegated to the scrap pile. While these old parts cannot be reused in their worn condition, a significant level of useful value is lost when they are simply recycled for their metal.

    The Project Team proposes to develop a pilot production remanufacturing process for a Government-selected high value component to significantly reduce its life cycle costs.

    2D/3D Data Model Collaboration between FRC Southwest, FRC East and FRC Southeast (Navy FRC’s, Siemens, SIS)

    The project team proposes a solution that will enable users at FRC Southeast and FRC East to access engineering and manufacturing information from the FRC Southwest via web interface. Each location will be able to utilize configuration controlled data generated by a range of technologies for acquiring the “as-is” condition for aircraft that enter the NAVAIR depot environment. The solution will provide a collaborative environment for maintenance and repair activities between the Depots. Data from the new environment will be formatted and managed to allow a team of users to access, visualize, collaborate, manipulate, and conference using engineering information, (2D and 3D) in a secure and traceable way.

    Automated Rotor Blade Stripping System (ARBSS) Service and Expansion (GLC, FRCE)

    The project team proposes to: 1) bring ARBSS fully on line in FY 2013 for immediate cost reductions, 2) to establish a track record of reliable performance, and 3) to extend the qualification of the process to V22 and H-1 substrate materials.

    Model Based Definition for Aircraft Launch, Recovery, and Support Equipment (NAWCAD Lakehurst)

    The project team proposes to formulate a MBD Technical Data Package (TDP) which will consist of engineering drawing formats that are compatible with the existing 3D PDF (PRC) solution, and embedding STEP files into these PDF files. A comparison of the PRO/E models with the new PRC and STEP model files will be conducted to ensure that these models define an identical geometry.

    Reducing Unscheduled Maintenance and No Fault Found Costs with the Intermittent Fault Detection & Isolation System (IFDIS) (Universal Synaptics)

    The Intermittent Fault Detection & Isolation System (IFDIS) is a tester that was specifically designed to fill the conventional ONE circuit at a time testing void. The IFDIS tests the LRU / WRA chassis wiring and identifies the precise location of each defect through the use of a hardware neural network that monitors ALL of the circuits in the Unit Under Test (UUT) individually, simultaneously and continuously (no scanning, sampling, averaging or multiplexing), detecting any intermittent event even as short at 50 nanosecond (0.00000005 seconds), that’s one twentieth of a millionth of a second. This quantum leap in test technology enables the chassis wiring problems to be easily repaired, as the root cause of the fault that drove the equipment item in for repair is accurately identified and isolated. Repairing the defect is usually trivial; finding the defect has always been, and continues to be, the problem.

     

    Please direct any interest in any of these efforts to Chuck Ryan, chuckr@ncms.org, 734-995-4905.

     

    Joint Technology Exchange Group Launches New Website

    The Joint Technology Exchange Group (JTEG) was created to better leverage technology improvements in depot maintenance through the collaboration of the Services, Joint Staff, OSD, and industry. The JTEG is composed of representatives from the military Services, the Defense Logistics Agency, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Maintenance Policy and Programs – (ODASD-MPP). The JTEG is a strong advocate for new technology or new equipment with cross-service potential to increase efficiency and/or effectiveness.

    On 4 April, NCMS and ODASD(MPP) launched the new JTEG website. The website provides a forum for the exchange of information on new technology, processes, and equipment developments involving depot maintenance. Industry and Department of Defense (DoD) personnel can use the site to share technology ideas and needs. You can review new and exciting technology projects posted on the website, or you can submit your own projects to post to the website. Go take a look at http://jteg.ncms.org.

     

    CTMA Project Highlight: Virtual Workplace Simulator

    “Well, sometimes training doesn’t pan out……but the results (of this training) are paying off.” Commanding Officer, FRC E.  This is what the user is saying about the simulation-based Experience Accelerator  piloted in a CTMA sponsored project between Fleet Readiness Center East and NCMS member Pendaran.

    So far, FRC-E has sent over 350 personnel, military and civilian, through the simulation. Results include a dramatic 75% reduction in OSHA recordable injuries and a 65% reduction in Lost Work Days, with similar results in quality improvement, on schedule delivery and more coming in daily.

    Continuous improvement, lean, 6-Sigma, TOC, etc. have been around about for years. Most organizations have trained in at least some of them. The problem has been that few achieved lasting improvements, no matter how much training was done. Now the CTMA/Pendaran Experience Accelerator delivers an alternative, bringing all the learning together to produce sustainable results.

    We learn by experience. We learn by practicing, not just listening to lectures or watching PowerPoint presentations. Yet the real world generally offers little opportunity for risk-free practice at improving operations performance.  This project is producing results.

    “Aside from flight school and survival school, I have not seen anything like this…. flawless.” Test Pilot, Major – US Marine Corps

    Check out the video at http://youtu.be/gMStCQOD2Zc

    The NCMS Contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2013

            

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    CTMA Connector March 2013: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    RoboDayBanner
    March 2013 Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input.

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    Navy Yard Technology Showcase Postponed

    Due to the budgetary uncertainties within the federal government, we have decided to postpone the April 9th NCMS/CTMA Technology Showcase at the Navy Yard until later this year.  We apologize for any inconveniences this may cause to you.

    However:

    Join us at the 2013 Annual CTMA Partners Meeting, May 21 through 23.

    The CTMA Partners Meeting is a combination virtual, and networking event.  Live keynote addresses and panel discussions will be via video-conference with rebroadcast over the internet to anyone registering for the event.  Tune-in to the conference whenever you want.

    Industry and local DoD personnel are invited to join us at NCMS in Ann Arbor for the Partners Meeting.  Project teams will be showcased during the Meeting, and each team will have 30 minutes to present their technology for broadcast to participants throughout the sustainment community.  We are also planning a networking reception on May 21 and lunch on the 22nd.

    The draft agenda can be found at: http://www.ncms.org/index.php/programs/ctma/ctma-symposium/ with registration to open soon.  Direct your questions to Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org.

    2013 $100,000 CTMA Maintenance Challenge

    Thanks to all the teams submitting concept papers to this years Maintenance Challenge.  Papers are currently being judged by the DoD evaluation team, and winners are expected to be announced in early April.  The winning team will also be featured at the Annual Partners Meeting.

    New NCMS Project: Collective Minds - Avoidance of Maintenance Cost through Predictive Trending

    Fleets of aerospace equipment are managed through carefully controlled supply chain processes. When any of the planning assumptions fail, for example, due to a new mission, a batch of out-of-spec parts or an ill-conceived maintenance procedure, an unexpected demand on maintenance and supply can develop, leading to increases in operating costs and reductions of equipment availability. Isolation of early warning signals of onset of such crises is critical to dealing with them proactively. Complexities of aerospace fleets make it particularly difficult for managers to recognize emerging patterns of systematic failures before they escalate. Often, only when availability is significantly affected, will attention be paid.

    Systematic failures of components in man-made fleets bear an analogy to disease outbreaks among humans. The spread of an out-of-spec parts from a delivery in some ways is like a new virus entering a community. Often, healthcare providers remain unaware of the system-wide nature of a problem until relatively late in its progression. Fortunately, data mining and machine learning technology has been demonstrated to reliably generate early warnings of the advent of human epidemics by observing the operation of the health care system over time.

    This project will begin to explore the hypothesis that similar mathematics has value in alerting to unusual patterns when monitoring health of fleets of the US Army’s helicopter fleets with the goal of seeing whether multi‐year cost avoidance can be achieved at the enterprise level. This will be done by identifying high value analyses and relevant demonstrations with the current Army Aviation data that have the ability to scale across the DoD and enable explanation of variances in reliability calculations and demand forecasting so that proactive cost‐reducing actions may be taken across DoD.

    The NCMS contact is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org.

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2012

            

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    CTMA Connector February 2013: DoD Maintenance Update

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    February 2013

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input.

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    The CTMA Annual Partners Meeting is now primarily a virtual event from May 21-23. The meeting will be broadcast to participants and will consist of three keynote speakers, the deputy commanders panel, a technology showcase event, and the DoD Joint Technology Exchange Group panel.  For those who can travel, NCMS will host the event and will be the site of the technology showcase.  Companies participating in the on-site showcase will also be given 20-30 minutes on-line to expose their technology to interested participants.  We will start at 1300 on 21 May, and conclude at 1200 on 23 May.  We are in the midst of developing the virtual capability, and registration for the event will be available soon. Please plan on participating in the exciting new virtual event!

    Technology Showcase at US Navy Yard, Washington D.C.  We are going to salvage a vestige of the original Partners Meeting at the Navy Yard by holding our CTMA Technology Showcase on-site at the Navy Yard on Tuesday, April 9.  All NCMS member companies are invited to the Navy Yard to participate at the tabletop event and present your capabilities to the engineers and managers located at the Navy Yard.  Stay tuned for event updates.

    Deadline is March 8 to enter the 2013 $100,000 NCMS/OSD Maintenance Challenge:

    We are looking for new CTMA project ideas with strong impacts on the DoD maintenance community.  Ideas submitted will be reviewed by a panel of judges and the winning team will receive $100,000 as part of a CTMA project.  Last year, several of the projects submitted to the Maintenance Challenge were funded by the CTMA program.

    Information can be found at:

    http://www.ncms.org/index.php/programs/ctma/ctma-symposium/the-2013-ncmsosd-maintenance-technology-challenge/

     

    CTMA Project Highlight: Human Augmentation System (HAS) Technology

    This project conducted a productivity assessment to evaluate the benefits of applying a Human Augmentation System (HAS) to assist workers as they used a heat induction tool to remove special hull treatment (SHT) from a submarine’s exterior. The study addressed both quantitative measures of productivity (residue removal rate) and qualitative measures of productivity (worker fatigue, ergonomics, etc.). The HAS technology is designed to carry the weight of heavy tools, allowing the worker to accomplish tasks with higher quality and less fatigue.

    A HAS productivity evaluation was successfully conducted at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (IMF). Five test subjects used a low heat induction tool to remove SHT tiles and SHT tile residue from various locations on a submarine hull. The workers performed this task both non-augmented and with a HAS. The evaluation had four primary objectives:

    1. Quantitatively determine how the HAS impacts productivity for a work team that is performing a heat induction task.
    2. Quantitatively determine how the HAS impacts productivity for an individual worker that is performing a heat induction task.
    3. Qualitatively evaluate how the HAS impacts worker injury and fatigue.
    4. Evaluate HAS reliability during a field trial to determine if the it can be effectively deployed in the rugged shipyard environment.

    The evaluation produced compelling results:

    1. The HAS enabled a single worker to continuously employ the heat induction tool with the assistance of one (1) other worker. In the current process a three (3) worker team is required to perform the same task. The testing indicates that HAS usage may reduce the necessary team size from three (3) to two (2), a 50% productivity improvement.
    2. Qualitative data that suggests HAS improves worker ergonomics and significantly reduces worker fatigue.
    3. The HAS performed effectively in a wide array of work environments (unstable footing, loose impediments, rain, wind, cold, etc.).

    Additionally, test participant feedback was overwhelmingly positive. Test participants were able to quickly acclimate to the system, maneuver through the entire shipyard while wearing the system, and implement the system in their typical activities. Test participants expressed a desire to implement the HAS into some aspect of their standard work.

    This study proved that using human augmentation to accomplish shipyard tasks involving heavy tools can improve productivity while mitigating a significant cause of worker injury. Both the improvement in productivity and the reduction in worker injury should result in cost savings.

    The HAS technology is a fundamental redefinition of the relationship between the worker and the tool, where the physical strength of the worker is no longer a limiting factor for work assignment.  The cost benefit using the HAS allows PSNS to reduce required crew size for from three to two, equating to a cost saving of $104K per year for Heat Induction Tool applications. These savings are increased as the number of HAS are deployed and utilized on SHT removal projects.

    " HAS technology is a fundamental redefinition of the relationship between the worker and the tool where the physical strength of the worker is no longer a factor." CAPT Williamson, PSNS CO

    Industrial Human Augmentation System (iHAS)

    • Increases productivity & quality of work, with reduced injuries

    zeroG ® - Exoskeletal Arm Systems: TRL 9

    • Allows operators to use heavy tools as if weightless
    • Supports the tool through a wide range of motion
    • Requires no power
    • Can reduce vibration transmission to operator
    • Single arm stabilize tools up to 40 lbs

    MANTISTM- Lower Body Exoskeleton: TRL 7

    • Provides critical mobility platform
    • Transfers loads through structure to the ground
    • Anthropomorphic design maintains operator flexibility
    • No power, electronics, actuation required
    • Simple to operate and minimal training required

    clip_image002clip_image004

    Project Partners

    • U.S. Navy- PSNS & IMF
    • U.S. Navy- Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division
    • Lockheed Martin
    • Equipois
    • NCMS

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2013

            

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    CTMA Connector January 2013: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
     
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    January 2013

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input.

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    Given the recent severe DoD travel restrictions, we are making the following changes to the NCMS/CTMA networking events:

     

    The CTMA Annual Partners Meeting, formerly the CTMA Symposium, will be primarily a virtual event, and will be held May 21-23.  The meeting will be broadcast to participants and will consist of three keynote speakers, the deputy commanders panel, a technology showcase event, and the DoD Joint Technology Exchange Group panel.  For those who can travel, NCMS will host the event and will be the site of the technology showcase.  We will start at 1300 on 21 May, and conclude at 1200 on 23 May.  Obviously we are working out the details, and will keep you informed. Please plan on participating in the exciting new virtual event!

     

    Technology Showcase at US Navy Yard, Washington D.C.: One popular aspect of the annual CTMA Annual Partners Meeting has been technology tabletop displays, and the Annual Partners Meeting now going virtual this year, we are going to have the Technology Showcase event at the Navy Yard on Tuesday, 9 April.  These showcase events in the past have received high accolades for their ability to target the Government’s technology needs, fill gaps and showcase members’ innovations. All NCMS member companies are invited to the Navy Yard to participate at the tabletop event and present your capabilities to the engineers and managers located at the Navy Yard.  Again, stay tuned for event updates.

     

    $100,000 NCMS/OSD Maintenance Challenge:

    Now that the Annual Partners Meeting is going virtual, we are introducing the 2nd Annual NCMS/OSD Maintenance Challenge as a separate event.  We are looking for new CTMA project ideas with strong impacts on the DoD maintenance community.  Ideas submitted will be reviewed by a panel of judges and the winning team will receive $100,000 as part of a CTMA project.

    Details of the Challenge:

    • All NCMS members are eligible to participate.
    • Submit concept paper to Chuck Ryan, NCMS (chuckr@ncms.org)
    • Due date: March 8, 2013 (by 5 pm Eastern time)

    Not yet a member of NCMS? Membership applications can be found here.

    Concept Paper format (not to exceed 10 pages)

    1. Title
    2. Statement of problem
    3. Proposed solution
    4. Deliverables (A report alone is not sufficient; projects are to deliver a product or service to the participating maintenance activity(ies). Preferably, such deliverables hold promise as problem solutions for other like maintenance activities throughout DoD.)
    5. Budget summary:
      • CTMA funds: $100K
      • Cost share from team:
      • Total project cost:
    6. Benefits summary:
      • Statement of the quantifiable benefits that are expected to be gained by DoD as a result of this project (an ROI for the project).
      • Statement of the performance measurements that are going to be undertaken during the course of the project.
      • Benefits to industry.
    7. Anticipated Participants (DoD maintenance activities, Industry Partners, other government facilities or academic institutions).

    A CTMA panel that will include technology leaders from each of the services will down select to five finalists

    •   Selection criteria –
      •   Overall benefit
      •   IOC within twelve months
      •   Strength of team/buy-in
      •   Level of innovation
    • Five finalists will be down selected and given 15 minutes to present their project idea via virtual meeting to the panel of judges
    • The judges will select a winner and runner-up
    • Technical progress / status will be reported to Senior Sustainment Leaders quarterly and during Maintenance Enterprise Steering Committee and Depot Commanders Peer to Peer meetings.

    Information can be found at:

    http://www.ncms.org/index.php/programs/ctma/ctma-symposium/the-2013-ncmsosd-maintenance-technology-challenge/

     

    Other Technology Showcases:

    NCMS is currently working with several DoD depots for scheduling Technology Showcases at their facilities.  In addition to the above event at the Navy Yard, we are trying to hold two more events during 2013.

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2013

            

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    CTMA Connector December 2012: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    RoboDayBanner
    December 2012 Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/. To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    We welcome the following organizations into NCMS:

    General Motors LLC (www.gm.com)

    General Motors LLC is engaged in the development, manufacture and sale of cars and trucks.

    Workforce Intelligence Network of Southeast Michigan (WIN) (www.win-semich.org)

    WIN is a consortium of 7 Michigan Works! Agencies and 8 Community Colleges formed to create a comprehensive and cohesive talent system that provides regional employers with the talent they need for success.

    Industrial Technology Institute, DBA Michigan Manufacturing Technology Center (MMTC) (www.mmtc.org)

    MMTC provides small and medium sized manufacturers with operational assessment, process improvement training, mentoring services, website technical assistance and market diversification tactics.

    NCMS/CTMA Technology Showcase at the Anniston Army Depot

    At the request of the Anniston Army Depot, the date of the Showcase is being changed from 30 January until a later date to be determined.  Please continue to register for the event and we will inform you of the new date as soon as it is finalized.

    More information and registration at:

    http://www.ncms.org/index.php/programs/ctma/ctma-symposium/technology-showcase-anniston-army-depot-2013/#About

    These showcase events in the past have received high accolades for their ability to target the Government’s technology needs, fill gaps and showcase members’ innovations.  It is a perfect opportunity that should not be missed!

    Anniston Army Depot has identified the following as technologies of particular interest:

    • Tracking material handling equipment
    • Fastener removal
    • Automated Inspection process
    • Machine tool monitoring
    • Automated painting
    • Waterjet paint / coating removal
    • Electrostatic paint booth
    • Manufacturing execution systems
    • Bridge scanning capabilities (combination of optical / laser)
    • Plating modernization
    • Housekeeping procedures for surface contaminates
    • Camouflage projection
    • Cold spray
    • Friction stir welding
    • Environmental
    • Cadmium plating fasteners
    • Supporting industrial base operations
    • Reverse engineering capabilities
    • Training
    • Plating and finishing
    • Painting and de-painting
    • Robotic-assisted ergonomics

    If you have any capabilities that can help Anniston Army Depot, your participation can help drive future technology initiatives.  The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, 734-995-7038, debral@ncms.org.

     CTMA Partners Meeting (formerly the CTMA Symposium) will be 9-10 April at the US Navy Yard, Washington, DC.

    The Partners meeting will discuss methods for successfully implementing technology at maintenance facilities, and to identify other technology initiatives that impact weapon system readiness.  The meeting agenda includes RADM Mark Whitney outlining NAVSEA needs, discussions with deputy commanders regarding their technology requirements, and examinations of other DoD initiatives impacting the maintenance and repair community led by Adele Ratcliff, director of the DoD ManTech Program.

    In addition, if you have a good idea for a quick hit technology insertion inititative, start preparing for the $100,000 Maintenance Challenge, continuing this year at the CTMA Partners Meeting.

    Details and registration will be available on the NCMS website in early January.

    John Johns awards Debbie Lilu with the Best Booth Plaque at 2012 Maintenance Symposium

    Best Booth Photo

    Recently Completed CTMA Project: Smart Machines

    Defense maintenance depots do not in general deploy systems for collecting, logging, and mining real-time status and health data from shop floor equipment assets. Many commercial industry entities have implemented these systems and have found that by using the insights gathered by mining and processing archived data they can:

    • Gain a true picture of actual asset utilization which can then be used to guide continuous process improvement (CPI) projects and lean events.
    • Perform Pareto analysis on production interruptions to identify and correct root causes.
    • Recognize negative trends and correct them before they interrupt production.
    • Gain better understanding of asset reliability which can guide a shift from time-based to reliability-centered maintenance (RCM).
    • Add equipment health monitors such as vibration and heat plus environmental monitors such as ambient temperature and humidity and move toward condition-based maintenance (CBM).
    • Optimize labor resource effectiveness.

    Failure of depot maintenance equipment, as in commercial manufacturing, has bad, sometimes catastrophic consequences. In commercial manufacturing, the consequences are financial unless the failure causes human injury. In depot maintenance, the consequence is usually a delay in returning assets to service. If the asset is mission critical, consequences can include human injury or death. In either case, failure prevention is crucial. Preventive maintenance is the best way to avoid process interruption due to equipment failure.

    Historically, maintenance on depot equipment has been performed on a scheduled basis. Schedule-based maintenance decreases the likelihood of process interruption due to equipment failure but may result in costly unnecessary maintenance. In recent years RCM has gained favor. In RCM, Mean-Time-To-Failure (MTTF) is determined from historic data and used to schedule pre­ventive maintenance accordingly. RCM reduces the possibility of unnecessary maintenance.

    Single purpose, standalone condition monitoring systems are now beginning to appear in defense depots, the most common being standalone vibration monitoring systems implemented on major rotating equipment. Such single purpose systems use a variety of mechanisms to report impending or actual failure of bearings.  CBM is the latest technology to impact equipment maintenance. In CBM, embedded sensors monitor the condition of critical equipment components and a computer system is used to detect deterioration in performance or even impending failure. The systems calculate remaining life, thereby enabling decisions on when to schedule downtime for maintenance.

    There is yet another type of system gaining favor with industry. These systems monitor process variables and environmental conditions to yield information on equipment asset health, utilization, process variation, and exception conditions. They are most useful for CPI. Such
    a system was the focus of this initiative.

    This CTMA effort installed Freedom eLOG at a total of nine pilot sites, three industry, five depots, and at the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST). Applications covered a broad variety of data sources – machine tools of various types and ages, injection molding, welding, heat treat, and even machines that lacked any kind of formal control system.

    The DoD maintenance community pilots validated the lessons learned even though not
    all pilots were well received and successful. Insights derived from the initial rubber com­pression mold pilot at RRAD played a role in helping RRAD manage a huge surge in remanufacturing of treaded vehicle demand driven by the wars in Southwest Asia. That success led to a production deployment on 51 machines in the Rubber Products Building.

    The Smart Machines technology is a driver for improved equipment utilization and CPI. To estimate benefits, assume the system produces a relatively modest throughput improvement of 5%. Out of a year, that amounts to 104 hours or 13 days. The project benefit is then the value of increased production in those 13 days, conserva­tively estimated to be about $100K for RRAD Rubber Products.

    In general, deployment can be expected to yield the following benefits:

    • Availability:
      • 40% productivity improvement, based on results in industry.
      • Greater throughput will result in better parts availability.
    • Cost:
      • Increased shop efficiency reduced non-productive time and its cost. Estimated benefit at RRAD Rubber Products Building is $100K but is application dependent and can be much greater.
    • Reliability:
      • Healthy machines produced more reliable products.
    • Cycle Time:
      • Awareness and analysis tools enabled improvements in asset utilization.
      • Improved asset utilization resulted in greater throughput and reduced cycle times.
      • Anticipated 10% increase in equipment utilization translates to 2.5% workload throughput increase and improved response to RESET needs.

    The Smart Machine system is applicable to all DoD organic maintenance depots. The estimated value extended across all depots is $5M/year.

    The NCMS contact is Tony Haynes, 734-995-4930, tonyh@ncms.org.

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2012

            

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    CTMA Connector October 2012: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    RoboDayBanner
    October 2012 Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    We welcome the following organizations into NCMS:

    One Network Enterprises, Inc. (www.onenetwork.com)

    One Network provides planning, execution and business intelligence applications build on a federated cloud computing platform.

    Anglicotech, LLC. (www.anglicotech.com)

    Anglicotech is a veteran-owned small business, specializing in Organizational Change Management and Enterprise Information Technology Implementation and Services. With a dedicated team of subject matter experts and experienced consultants, Anglicotech is committed to providing innovative solutions to the most complex problems by devising all-encompassing plans that address the tactical, operational and strategic levels.

    Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) (www.michigan.gov/deq)

    MDEQ provides compliance assistance, pollution prevention and sustainability resources as well as partnership building.

    SAVE THE DATE: 2013 CTMA Symposium– Fast Track Collaboration

    8-10 April, 2013 at the MWR Conference Center, US Navy Yard, Washington, DC.

    Agenda and registration available early 2013.

    Visit NCMS/CTMA at Booth #707 at the 2012 Defense Maintenance Symposium, 13-16 November in beautiful Grand Rapids, Michigan.  Vote us best booth again where we will be showcasing five of our member companies and their capabilities including:

        • Eclypse International
        • Spectro, Inc
        • Imaginestics, LLC
        • PerfectPoint
        • Curtiss Wright Corporation

    Register for the Symposium at http://www.sae.org/events/dod/registration.htm.

    SAVE ANOTHER DATE: NCMS/CTMA Technology Showcase

    30 January 2013 – Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    Stay tuned for details.

    New CTMA Projects:

    Contractor Property Management for Maintenance

    As DoD Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) continues to evolve, more of the maintenance activities traditionally performed by operating forces are being transferred to in-theater contractors. To successfully perform these missions, Government Furnished Property (GFP) is frequently provided to contractors in order to perform OCO tasks; however, the US Government currently has no visibility of the items in theater that are brought in by contractors and has limited visibility of GFP provided in-theater in support of maintenance operations.

    Interim Policy Directive #12-07 issued by CENTCOM requires contractors to provide visibility of large items moving into and out of Afghanistan whether contractor owned or government owned under the control of the contractor. Additionally, to improve OCO visibility, DoD has recently published regulations within the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) to govern these processes. Regulations require that the Services utilize the Synchronized Pre-deployment and Operational Tracker, (SPOT) to track GFP to Contractors. Regulation compliance is crucial to maintaining effective property management, enhance fiscal accountability and ensure adherence to contractual obligations by both the Government and the Contractor/Entity.

    This CTMA project will develop or enhance those processes necessary to help ensure the Marine Corps commitment to policy compliance. Project objectives will enhance visibility of relevant Government and contractor property to Government stakeholders and provide the oversight required for equipment under contractor control subject to in-theater/out of theater transfers.

    For additional project information, contact Jeff Walker at jeffw@ncms.org, 360-782-1370

     

    Coalition Logistics Interoperability (CLI) Joint Logistics Integration

    Traditional execution of logistical support is focused on supportability at the individual service component level. Typical of this strategy is a significant redundancy of parts stocks, consumable inventory, and maintenance capability, commonly referred to as the “Iron Mountain”. The DoD has received the mandate to leverage existing and new capabilities in a joint environment, in order to pool and share sustainment resources between services. To this end, the CTMA program has supported the DoD in a series of Sense and Respond Logistics (S&RL) demonstrations, technical development initiatives and spiraling technology efforts focused on the investigation and development of the necessary tools required to successfully realize this mandate. To date, several key technologies have been developed by Government agencies and various commercial enterprises which enable more efficient and effective sustainability efforts. A basic proof of concept was achieved at the ExLog War Game in Quantico, Virginia in June 2012.

    The objective of this CTMA project is to build from the success of previous project work and identify means by which the joint services may comply with DoD/Service policy, leverage IUID data, reduce maintenance costs, reduce supply costs, improve total life cycle system management, and gain joint service maintenance interoperability without sacrificing weapon system reliability or readiness.

    For additional project information, contact Jeff Walker at jeffw@ncms.org, 360-782-1370

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2012

            

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    3025 Boardwalk
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    CTMA Connector September 2012: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    RoboDayBanner
    September 2012 Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/. To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    We welcome the following organizations into NCMS:

    Tracen Technologies, Inc. (www.tracen.com)

    Tracen is a technology products and services company specializing in integrated mobile and web technology solutions. Tracen’s flagship product, COMMANDmobile®, is a web based integrated product suite featuring mobile data collection, intelligent dispatching and role based security.

    Troika Solutions, LLC (www.troikasol.com)

    Troika is a veteran-owned small business with over 90-years of senior Marine Corps and DoD experience. Troika has been on the cutting edge of military system lifecycle management including requirements development, logistics and acquisition strategy analysis and implementation, and system fielding. From analyses to subject matter expert support, Troika combines strategy with an understanding of technology and innovation to deliver successful results.

     

    Come Visit NCMS/CTMAat the 2012 Defense Maintenance Symposium, 13-16 November in beautiful Grand Rapids, Michigan.  Vote us best booth again where we will be showcasing five of our member companies and their capabilities including:

    • Eclypse International
    • Spectro, Inc
    • Imaginestics, LLC
    • PerfectPoint
    • Curtiss Wright Corporation

     

    Completed Project:  Implementation of Predictive Modeling in Support of USMC Systems Command – Product Group Nine (PG 09)

    As platforms age, failures occur and must be handled by the maintenance processes. These events drive requirements for repair parts, placing demand on the supply system. For example, if the fleet has a surge in operations, the number of failures, maintenance events, and required repair parts likewise increase. If these requirements are not met, scheduled operations may not be met.

    Repairs and replacements at the operational and intermediate levels for most components are handled internally by the United States Marine Corps (USMC); a limited number of secondary repairable items (SECREPS) are identified and contracted logistics support (CLS) programs are put into place for repair and return of unservice­able SECREPS.

    The Clockwork Solutions, Inc.’s Total Life Cycle Management Assessment Tool (TLCM-AT) simulation model takes all of these rules into consideration. TLCM-AT was used to run “what if” scenarios on maintenance, logistics, policies, removal of parts for repair; and spare consumption. Analyses help to ensure that the forecasted project returns an investment over time in terms of readiness and costs. More detail is provided in Section 2.1 and Appendix A.

    The TLCM-AT baseline model served as a starting point for scenario development, and
    is essentially a snapshot of the current com­position, disposition and state of the fleet
    (Section 2.2). This included the work break­down structure and configuration of each individual Medium Tactical Vehicle Replace­ment (MTVR), any spare parts on-hand or soon to be delivered, the current age and mileage of each vehicle and component, and the current status (functional or deadlined) of each vehicle and component. The outcome of this analysis showed that armored MTVRs performed worse across all selected metrics than unarmored, most pronounced for vehicles in-theatre, and worsening over time.

    In the future, further analysis can be applied to develop provisioning plans to minimize delay to repair or replace components. For example, follow-on analysis can answer the questions:

    • How can provisioning strategy improve availability of armored MTVRs?
    • What is the best balance of cost and logistics performance in provisioning to support armored MTVRs?
    • How can provisioning be applied to deliver more consistent logistics performance in the armored MTVR fleet?

    Global Combat Support System-Marine Corps (GCSS-MC) requirements stemmed from supply difficulties experienced during Operation Iraqi Freedom. A faulty network led to front-line Warfighters being unable to update request information and order supplies, resulting in Marine supply erring on the side of safety and sending above and beyond front-line require­ments, resulting in overage of front-line inventory.

    GCSS-MC decreases MTVR maintenance customer wait time and the proportion of maintainers’ time spent on administrative tasks. Fewer adminis­trative hours gives the GCSS-MC maintenance process more flexibility to cope with a surge in demand.

    During work conducted by Clockwork Solutions, Inc. (CSI) to assist in the subset of sustainment block planning encompassing repair parts, a requirement to explore cases where Class IX block performance may be improved was demonstrated.  The work also highlights issues with Marine Corps data correlation. Specifically, technical manuals do not match Item Applications (Item Apps) data. This hinders employment of modeling and simulation tools to provide insight into the multiple future possibilities the MPF, or any Marine Corps element, may face. It is likely the development of more models to analyze Class IX will reveal more areas to improve materiel availability (Ma) through better sparing strategies.

    The USMC Systems Command, Product Group 09 (PG09), Operational Force Systems (OFS) requires the use of the predictive life cycle modeling of Marine Corps ground weapon systems, as well as professional modeling and consulting support, to support various life cycle and product support analyses. Through this project, models previously developed with the TLCM-AT, as well as new system models were applied to support predictive analysis for Marine Corps Systems Command, and other Marine Corps agencies that require the use of predictive modeling.

    Comprehensive life cycle scenario analysis will help the Program Managers, Life Cycle Logisticians, and leaders at the Enterprise level more clearly articulate Table of Authorized Materiel Control Numbers (TAMCNs) specific supportability requirements as they relate to system performance over time, to include: cost, operational availability, materiel availability and reliability.

    Benefits

    Predictive life cycle modeling of weapons systems results in predictive analysis/modeling that directly leads to:

    • Enhanced supportability requirements, increasing availability of parts to the Warfighter; and reducing delay and cost by ensuring materiel availability/reliability.
    • Determination that incentives for early delivery of parts have a greater impact than penalties for late delivery of parts.
    • Each MTVR being a “collection of Line Replaceable Units,” the Performance Based Logistics (PBL) contract’s optimization of materiel availability at affordable cost expands service and readiness for the Warfighter.
    • TLCM-AT model directly reflects the composition and disposition of the entire MTVR fleet, with its consideration of all vehicle characteristics, including date placed into service, operational use tempo, and known miles driven per year.

    The primary benefits of implementing GCSS-MC include two thirds fewer required man-hours for maintainer’s administrative duties, and a 25% decrease in average Customer Wait Time (CWT) – a savings of almost 20 days:

    • Free hours from administrative duties afford the GCSS-MC Maintenance process more flexibility to absorb increases in demand while continuing acceptable service levels.
    • Additional benefits of GCSS-MC include increased efficiency measured by fewer averge MTVRs in maintenance at any random time.

    Decreased shipping times and parts delay improve CWT but also increase maintainer utilization. GCSS-MC puts Maintenance in a better position for these changes by reducing manpower requirements from other administrative sources.

    GCSS-MC provides web-based technology for Marines to access and update near real-time information from any location or time. GCSS-MC combines data from maintenance, supply, and finance into a single, secure system to improve logistics, support, and warfighting capabilities.

    Low Ma was observed in packages using current Class IX sparing levels. Risk-based sparing packages can be increase Ma by as much as 50%. Savings are represented as spare platforms that need to be acquired to achieve an average of 95% Ma over the first 30 days with the current Class IX blocks (Table 1).

    Table 1. Summary of Results in Terms of Ma Gain (increase in platform
    availability) and Cost of Repair Part Inventory

    Platform Ma Gain Inventory Cost Total Savings
    (Ma Gain) – (Spares Cost)
    LAV $31,500,000 $8,510,149 $22,989,851
    M1A1 $122,400,000 $98,285,684 $24,114,316
    MTVR $162,360,000 $984,476 $161,375,524
    LVSR $10,240,000 $402,584 $9,837,416
    M777 $99,200,000 $3,199,943 $98,000,057
    Net Gain: $314,317,164

     

     

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2012

            

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    CTMA Connector August 2012: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
     
     
    August 2012 Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input.

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    We welcome the following organization into NCMS:

    Whitney, Bradley & Brown, Inc. (http://wbbinc.com/)

    A management consulting firm providing unique, creative and innovative products to both government and commercial sectors of the Defense and Federal industries.

     

    SAVE THE DATE: 2013 CTMA Symposium – Fast Track Collaboration

    8-10 April, 2013 in the Washington, DC area.  Plan to participate.

     

    Come Visit NCMS/CTMA at the 2012 Defense Maintenance Symposium, 13-16 November in beautiful Grand Rapids, Michigan.  Vote us best booth again where we will be showcasing five of our member companies and their capabilities including:

    • Eclypse International
    • Spectro, Inc
    • Imaginestics, LLC
    • PerfectPoint
    • Curtiss Wright Corporation

     

    New CTMA Project: Joint Test Protocol for Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    A bench level joint test protocol to accurately recreate hot section wear, plugging, glazing, and Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) formation on turbine engine components does not exist.

    This project will design a CMAS-forming sand and dust fine media which will ultimately be used to aggressively screen low performing components/protective systems and replicate degradation similar to the most problematic dusts on ingestion into an operating gas turbine engine in the SWA theater of operations. Assorted synthetic and natural sands and dusts used in typical erosion tests do not produce the effects observed in engines and components returned from the field.

    Requirements of the test sand includes:

    • The particle sizes of the dust will need to be small enough to bypass the particle separators, and collect in eddy spots.
    • The dust composition will also need to react chemically and thermally on heating to produce CMAS deposition that chemically attacks standard thermal barrier coatings, thereby exposing base metal to high temperatures and negatively affecting blade aerodynamics.
    • The material must be Continental United States (CONUS) sourced in amounts that are useful for DoD bench level and original equipment manufacturer (OEM) full-scale engine test purposes.

    The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org,

     

    CTMA Project Completion: Inspection and Repair Preparation Cell (IRPC)

    IRPC represents a direct response to reducing sustainment cost by increasing the availability and reliability of critical composite structures through replacement of artisan dependent inspection and repair op
    erations with computer-based technology. The current manual practice includes tap testing as the detection method, manual scarfing to remove the defect, and manual patch preparation. These activities all contribute elements of inaccuracy and waste.

    Five NCMS industry partners teamed with eight Department of Defense (DoD) and federal organizations to identify and demonstrate a suite of integrated technologies to achieve the goal of streamlining the repair process as well as intro­duce elements of consistency and high quality.

    The baseline artifact selected for evaluation of the technologies was the C-130 Radome although the technique can be applied to new aircraft program materials to identify manu­facturing defects as well as structures being refurbished. Defects include delamination, physical damage, and presence of moisture. Computer numerically controlled (CNC) motion techniques coupled with optical scanning are used to establish a geometric data base tied to a reference coordinate system for the specific structure being evaluated. Shearography, being a global non-destructive inspection (NDI) tech­nology, is then used to identify suspect areas within the structure for further evaluation. Using the reference coordinate system as a guide, the suspect areas are further inspected using more probing terahertz NDI technology to establish defect types, boundaries, and depth of the defects. The two step evaluation technique results in high definition defect data in an acceptable elapsed time. The data is overlaid onto the Radome surface using a laser projection system for visual identification of defect areas.

    The IRPC when fully integrated will use CNC technology to automatically scarf defect areas, cut appropriately shaped repair patch materials, and guide the repair technician in the repair process. Benefits are in the form of consistency of repair, cost reduction, lead time reduction, and retention of structure historical data. While the fully integrated IRPC will maximize the benefits obtained, the individual technologies will provide immediate benefits. Downscaled versions of the IRPC can be implemented in a building block fashion and is presented as an alternative transition path.

    The primary objective of the IRPC Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the enabling technologies required to achieve the vision of an automated inspection and repair cell for composite structures (Figure 1). The C-130 Radome was selected to serve as the basis for the evaluation.

    The project concluded with a successful demonstration of applicable technologies resulting in the machine tool based removal of composite material at controlled depths to the single ply level of accuracy. This demonstration led to the development of a concept for the fully implemented IRPC (Figure 2).

    NDI techniques were evaluated for the identification of defects in Radome type structures. Evaluation has shown that the most appropriate implementation of the IRPC concept will use three levels of technology. The sequential use of various technologies

    clip_image002

    Figure 1. Enabling Technologies

    clip_image004

    Figure 2. Fully Integrated System

    will provide the best characterization of defects in the least possible time:

    • Scan to provide geometric data in an electronic file.
    • Scan to identify areas of interest where there is a high likelihood of surface and/or sub-surface defects.
    • Detail scan areas of interest to finalize characterization of defects.

     

    Multiple technologies were evaluated at each level. Downselection led to the identification of the most appropriate technology for each level. The Level 1 digitizing technology was identified as the T-Scan laser scanning technique from Steinbichler. The Level 2 technology for global defect area identifica­tion was identified as shearography from Steinbichler. The Level 3 technology for local defect characterization was identified as terahertz scanning from Picometrix.

    The need for a standard test panel with known defects to properly evaluate and downselect from the technologies for finite defect recog­nition was identified. Both single layer and dual layer standard test panels were designed for this purpose and manufactured for use within the project.

    A technology and associated hardware from Moister Register for identification of moisture in the composite structure that could be seamlessly integrated into the IRPC was identified and demonstrated (Figure 3).

    The IRPC concept includes operator intervention for tasks where automation is either impractical or simply more effectively performed manually. Laser projection was identified as a technology that could be integrated into the IRPC to display results to operators on the Radome surface and serve to control and validate the manual operations. LASERGUIDE from Assembly Guidance Systems was selected as this technology. Due to its immediate application potential a LASERGUIDE unit was demonstrated. Basic training in use of the unit has been provided to Warner Robins ALC with the goal to implement the system into existing operations.

    Exposure to the IRPC concept has been broadened to include both commercial and military potential users. Many of these new potential users have participated regularly in the weekly teleconferences. Active partici­pation in the form of identification of broader requirements to meet industry repair needs has been provided by these new participants making the IRPC concept more universally applicable. The IRPC project through this process has spawned an ongoing activity in composite repair, the Consortium for Im­proving/Integrating Advanced Composites Processes (CIACP) led by the GFM organization.

    Critical to achieving the vision of the IRPC was the ability for the various technologies to work in an integrated fashion. While much software development will be required to achieve

    clip_image006

    clip_image008

    Figure 3. Identifying Moisture

    integration in an automated sense, the final demonstration made by GFM showed that functionally the separate technologies could work in harmony. Further, the notion of a machine tool based coordinate system enables the individual technologies to work sequentially in a seamless fashion on a once-tooled pallet platform.

    The benefits realized by the implementation of the IRPC are many. Several of these benefits relate to the overall impact of supply chain issues. Regarding Radomes in general among the most prominent qualitative benefits are:

    • Improved repair consistency and precision. The IRPC being a mechanized versus manual repair will perform the repair process against well defined defects in the same way each time.
    • The Radomes have a typical long service life and are serialized assets within the defense supply chain system. The IRPC captures contour and historical repair data in digital form. This historical data can be easily stored and accessed for future reference.
    • The historical data can be used to plan and guide future repairs as well as expanding the data base functionality to include records of field repairs.
    • Precision defect definition and removal provides accurate data for patch prepara­tion increasing material utilization.
    • Application of LASERGUIDE system provides technicians with instructions for accurately placing patches and proper sequence for repair.

    The NCMS contact is  Bill Waddell, wwadd49648@aol.com.

     

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2012

            

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    Read More

    CTMA Connector July 2012: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    RoboDayBanner
    July 2012 Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    We welcome the following organizations into NCMS:

    KALO, LLC

    KALO, LLC is a DoD marketing & technical consulting company that provides subject matter expertise in laboratory projects, contracting, program management, logistics support, requirements generation, ITAR, SOCOM, G-2 ISR, etc…

    University of Michigan (www.umich.edu)

    The University of Michigan is a world class research university.

    Macro USA Corporation (www.macrousa.com)

    MacroUSA Corp. specializes in Unmanned Systems, MOUT Systems, and Safety, Surveillance and Inspection Systems with a vision to approach each project with creativity, revolutionary designs and cutting edge engineering. With efforts aimed at creating superior, more compact, and cost effective products than what is currently available.

    New CTMA Project Opportunities:

    Coalition Logistics Interoperability

    Traditional execution of maintenance and logistical support is focused on supportability as a standalone service with some interaction at the DoD joint level. Typical of this strategy is a significant redundancy of parts stocks, consumable inventory, and maintenance capability, commonly referred to as the “Iron Mountain”. Ironically a significant number of repair and support items are common across the spectrum of Warfighters. Unfortunately, to date there does not exist a simple means to share and support common items in a joint or coalition environment. Significant cost in terms of transport, sustainment, support and redeployment is incurred by the different cooperating elements without consideration of economies of scale for sharable support items that could be obtained. In an era of limited resources, leveraging common capabilities to execute operations is a desired end state.

    The objectives of this work is to become compliant with DoD/Service policy, leverage IUID data, reduce maintenance costs, reduce supply costs, improve TLCSM, and gain Joint/Coalition interoperability.  The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org.

     

    Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) Warfighter Maintenance and Implementation and Operations Support

    Operations in OIF and current operations in OEF have identified several deficiencies in Material Management, Equipment Accountability/ Visibility, Distribution Visibility and Material Readiness. In addition, records tracking of maintenance activities has also been insufficient. These deficiencies have had a negative impact on the DoD’s ability to sustain current warfighter material requirements and capabilities. These deficiencies will continue during the retrograde from Afghanistan [ Service R4 (Reset, Reconstitution, Right-Size, Re-Focus (R4)).

    The purpose of this project is to improve asset maintenance and readiness by increasing asset visibility – with a focus on equipment maintenance status and condition for the warfighter. The goal is to address timely maintenance, increase the efficient allocation of maintenance resources (people, processes and tools) necessary to increase the overall readiness posture of critical weapons systems. This will be accomplished by conducting a fit gap and requirements analysis resulting in a draft Initial Capabilities Document (ICD) focused on improved maintenance operations. The ICD will then enable the application of the doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel and facilities (DOTMLPF) process. The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org.

     

    Master Data Repository (MDR) Proof of Concept (PoC)/Capabilities Based Assessment (CBA) and Data Storage & Utilization Strategy

    The tremendous amount of logistics data created as a result of recent operations currently resides in the MDR/LIW has data quality issues, is inefficiently organized and is at risk of being lost due to a lack of a data strategy.  The Marine Corps Master Data Repository/Logistics Information Warehouse (MDR/LIW) storage servers are at maximum capacity because all data is being kept with no storage or retrieval strategy, purpose or planned replacement. This data is necessary to conduct ongoing sustainment and Depot level repair, additionally the data is used to affect acquisition decision, improve warranty decisions and justify O&M budget cycles.

    This CTMA initiative will develop and conduct a Proof of Concept, built upon an exhaustive data forensic analysis and coupled with a forward looking capabilities based assessment that will result in the establishment of the Marine Corps Logistics Data Storage and Utilization Strategy. In doing so, this CTMA project will substantially reduce logistics enterprise risk and minimize Marine Corps sustainment costs associated with the loss of tremendous amounts of logistics data currently being stored within the MDR/LIW. Additionally, weapon system reliability and readiness will be improved by better data mining and analysis that will better pinpoint maintenance and repair trends. This CTMA project will also serve as a template for logistics data storage, access, utilization and safeguarding that can be utilized by the entire DoD. The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org.

     

    Marine Corps Logistics Portfolio Consolidation Proof of Concept (PoC), Business Case Analysis (BCA) and Demonstration

    There are a number of Logistics Portfolio Information Technology (IT) systems and applications developed for use in overseas contingency operations. An analysis of the percentage of operating force usage and subsequent return on investment (ROI) of the current Logistics Portfolio supporting overseas contingency operations has not been conducted. As a result, DC I&L, in his role as the Log Portfolio Manager, has had to rely on anecdotal reports and claims from system program managers to determine the best allocation of resources for the Log Portfolio as well as development of an integration strategy. To date, no detailed and exacting analysis and associated testing/implementation have been accomplished, which results in sub-optimized sustainment of weapon systems, including costs and readiness. This puts the entire Marine Corps Sustainment IT support environment at great risk.

    This CTMA initiative will develop and conduct a PoC, demonstration and follow on BCA to determine technology enhancements and best value recommendations for making the 208 tactical and wholesale systems and applications in the logistics portfolio interoperable within the portfolio and with the Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) Command and Control (C2) Tactical Services Oriented Architecture (TSOA).  The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org.

     

    Marine Corps Marine Air Ground Task Forces (MAGTF) Logistics Support Systems Interoperability Demonstration and Capabilities-Based Assessment CBA)

    The Marine Corps invested a great deal of time and resources in fielding the Global Combat Support System-Marine Corps (GCSS-MC). Due to technology limitations, the GCSS-MC solution is not suitable for deployed environment at the tactical edge. Specifically, GCSS-MC has challenges operating in a disconnected, intermittent, low bandwidth, high latency (DIL-H) environment. The MLS2 are currently fielded and providing sustainment support to MAGTFs deployed around the world. However, the lack of integration between the MLS2, GCSS-MC and MAGTF C2 have sub optimized the level of sustainment support the Logistics Combat Element (LCE) of the MAGTF can provide. As a result, sustainment costs and weapon systems readiness are at a sub-optimized level. This CTMA initiative will directly address this sustainment issue.

    This CTMA initiative will improve battlefield logistics support and reduce sustainment costs for MAGTFs. The CTMA project will conduct an interoperability demonstration and Capabilities Based Assessment (CBA) of the MAGTF Logistics Support Systems (MLS2) that will prove the concept of leveraging Services Oriented Architecture (SOA) to expose capabilities of legacy systems and demonstrate interoperability between systems in a tactical, disconnected intermittent low bandwidth high latency (DIL-H) environment. Additionally, the lessons learned from this demonstration will lead to an approved Joint Capabilities Integration Development System (JCIDS) requirements document and integration strategy. This CTMA project will reduce sustainment costs while improving weapon system readiness. Lessons learned from this project can be used by the other services to achieve similar results.  The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org.

     

    Marine Corps Distribution IT Portfolio Proof of Concept (PoC) and Business Case Analysis (BCA)

    As the Marine Corps continues to affect changes that will enhance the readiness of its equipment, reduce its sustainment costs and increase weapon system readiness and lethality, the enterprise realizes that critical infrastructure changes need to begin. Concurrently the Service is under pressure to adhere to the mandate to move to a Joint Logistics Enterprise environment by the DoD. Many of the components that are pivotal to success in reaching this goal, along with maintenance modernization and equipment readiness, are legacy, unstructured and not integrated. One item of key note is the logistics Information Technology systems that support Marine Corps acquisition, development and maintenance.

    This CTMA initiative will address Marine Corps logistics distribution issues that significantly impact sustainment costs and weapon system readiness. To accomplish this, the project will develop, test and analyze a solution that will provide shared visibility without delays across internal organizations and stakeholders based on permissions while sensing exceptions and responding collaboratively and incrementally. This will be conducted by the development of a Notional Logistics Distribution Solution based upon evolving Marine Corps direction, conduct of a PoC followed by a detailed BCA which will justify adoption of the Notional Solution. This development and associated Proof of Concept/analysis will address the Distribution segment of the logistics portfolio upon sustainment, greatly improving weapon system readiness at reduced costs.  The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org.

     

    Heat Induction Removal of Special Hull Treatment (SHT) Using Exoskeleton and zeroG Arm Technology

    The removal of SHT (Special Hull Treatment) is a major cost driver in the maintenance, repair, and disposal process of submarines. Shipyard personnel are required to remove large quantities of SHT using archaic techniques that employ hand held tools and chain fall to physically tear off the materials. Currently the disposal program for 688 Class attack submarines is a very difficult task due to the large amount of tile and the large number of submarines that are decommissioned and being recycled. The current method for removal of more than 10,000 tiles per 688 class submarine is the use of reciprocating saw with one mechanic operating the saw, while another pulls the corner of a the tile with vise grips to give enough room for the blade to slice the back side of the tile. The process leaves tile remnants, adhesive, and paint residue that must be removed with a small chipping gun. These processes causes hand, wrist, and arm fatigue in a very short time period. Over years, the accumulative effects and injury on personnel increases dramatically typically resulting in surgery of the shoulders or other area of the body affected by repetitive exposure.

    This CTMA project will utilize the heat induction process with exoskeleton and zeroG technology to achieve safe and efficient removal of SHT and MIP in a manner suitable for a shipyard dry dock environment and operable with only moderate training. The NCMS contact is Dana Ellis, danae@ncms.org.

     

    HUSKY Route Clearance Vehicle Front/Rear Modules

    Current operations in Afghanistan require the use of the Husky route clearance vehicle to ensure safe travel of military and civilian personnel throughout the region.  The Husky vehicle is the main vehicle used in route clearance operations in identifying and locating IDE threats. Currently route clearance missions are being reduced due to the lack of front and rear modules in theater to repair and maintain the fleet.  This CTMA project would test the design and sustainment of these modules through a pilot deployment in theater.  The NCMS contact is Chuck Ryan, chuckr@ncms.org.

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2012

            

    Sender Information
    To be removed from future mailings please reply with "unsubscribe all" to be removed from ALL NCMS mailings.

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
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    ©2012 National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Inc.

    Read More

    CTMA Connector June 2012: DoD Maintenance Update

    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences
    News and Views from the World of Manufacturing
    RoboDayBanner
    June 2012 Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input.

    Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to: listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.

    We welcome the following companies to NCMS:

    Applied Technology Integration, Inc. (ATI) (www.ATIintegration.com)

    ATI is a full service product development firm offering engineering, design, analysis, testing and manufacturing services. Specializing in weight optimized engineered solutions in an effort to help customers integrate their innovations into cost effective manufacturable products.

    University of Dayton Research Institute (www.udri.udayton.edu)

    Helping customers achieve research and development goals and solve challenging technological problems has been the focus of the University of Dayton Research Institute since its inception more than 50 years ago.

    QinetiQ North America (www.QinetiQ-NA.com)

    QinetiQ North America delivers innovative solutions to support defense, security and intelligence organizations (i.e., Dept. of Homeland Security, Dept. of Defense etc…) and to support federal civilian agencies (i.e., Dept. of State, GSA & NASA etc…)

    Completed CTMA Project: Synthetic Instrumentation (SI)

    This project investigated the benefits of deploying a state-of-the-art automatic test system (ATS) test station incorporating SI in a DoD maintenance application. SI reduces reliance upon hardware-intensive instrument functionality necessary to satisfy traditional ATS stimulus and response requirements. Since ATS test stations are employed throughout the DoD maintenance hierarchy, the transition from traditional instruments to SI presented a significant opportunity to mitigate hardware obsolescence, reduce the equipment footprint, improve adaptation to emerging requirements and reduce the overall lifecycle cost of ATS (Figure 1). The SI CTMA ATS performance was benchmarked against the legacy United States Air Force (USAF) F-15 Electronic Systems Test Set (ESTS). The ESTS is currently used by the USAF to perform Intermediate-level maintenance on approximately 50 avionics line replaceable units (LRUs) across their F-15 aircraft fleet.

    clip_image002

    Figure 1. SI CTMA Technology vs. Legacy Systems

    The SI CTMA project was conducted in two phases and focused on evaluation of SI-based ATS benefits in the following categories:

    1. Maintenance Efficiency

    2. Maintenance Effectiveness

    3. Operational Availability

    4. Operations and Support Cost.

    A series of Key Performance Parameters (KPPs) were established to capture the performance related benefits associated with Maintenance Efficiency, Maintenance Effectiveness and Operational Availability. The achieved results at Elmendorf and Seymour AFBs are truly revolutionary. The projected U.S. Air Force operations and support cost savings to replace ESTS with the SI system to support the F-15 avionics LRU workload over the next 25 years exceeds $500M.

     

    Completed CTMA Project: High Performance Cordage-Deck Edge Netting (HPC-DEN)

    The main objective of this collaboration effort was to install HPC-DEN for improved stealth and lower operation costs for U.S. Naval ships. Presently the Navy uses nylon netting as the standard net material for low temperature applications. Nylon nets typically have to be replaced anywhere from 12-24 months due to breakdown from ultraviolet degradation, abrasion, and shrinkage.

    Originally developed under a previous SBIR program (N00178-00-C-3053), cordage netting was developed that would have the same mechanical properties as the nylon netting with a longer service life.

    Nets fabricated from the HPC-DEN cordage under the SBIR contract were installed on the USS Howard (DDG 83) in August 2003 and removed in April 2009 (after approximately five years and nine months of “in-service” time). Under a different contract (N00014-10-C-0084), the “in-service” nets were load tested to deter­mine the residual strength of the nets. Load testing was performed to three separate phases though only Phase I (1,000 lbs. load for 10 minutes) is relevant to the Navy specification. Phase II (test to failure or 4,000 lbs.) and Phase III (10% cords cut to simulate damaged nets) testing were performed to determine the extent of the net degradation.

    All “in-service” load tested nets successfully passed all three phases of testing with no failures. Since these nets were still capable of supporting 4,000 lbs., one can extrapolate that the nets will provide a minimal of six years service life and still support the Navy load requirements – sustain 1,000 lbs. force for 10 minutes for large nets and 500 lbs. for 10 minutes for corner nets. Based on the successful load test data, the team sought out a ship that needed new nets as a means to provide the ship with new nets and in turn to transition the technology for the laboratory to a real-life application. A helicopter landing trainer (HLT), USS Baylander (IX-514) stationed at Pensacola Naval Air Station, Pensacola, FL was chosen for installation of the nets. The ship’s crew installed and lashed 27 HPC safety nets around the flight deck edge perimeter frames. Figure 1 shows the installed HPC-DEN nets along one side of the ship. Figure 2 shows the nylon cargo nets lashed to the frames prior to installation of the new nets.

    After net installation, all 27 of the flight deck safety nets were subjected to a static weight test in accordance with NSWCCD-SSES Sketch #SK-7548 and successfully passed.

    clip_image002[4]

    Figure 1. HPC-DEN Installed on USS Baylander
    (IX-514
    )

    clip_image004

    Figure 2. Nylon Deck Edge Safety Nets on USS Baylander (IX-514)

    The HPC-DEN installations should provide the ship with:

    • At least a 6-year service life (a 3-fold improvement over current system)
    • Reduced static load test maintenance
    • Easy installation for improved turnaround times on replacement netting
    • Net construction and finish to custom sizes
    • Weight reduction and greater load strength
    • Prolonged life of aluminum frames
    • Reduced net shrinkage
    • Resistance to ultraviolet wear and weathering
    • Resistance to salt water, alkalis, acid, oils and gasoline
    • Netting extruded in color totally eliminating need for additional color coating per NAVSEA requirements
    • Decreased uplift forces
    • Reduced drag when the nets are submerged in water during operations
    • Improved fuel efficiency
    • Reduced life cycle costs
    • No radar signature.

    A recent published investigation of Maintenance History Reports on DDG-51 class stanchion damage found that hull numbers 52 to 84 contained a total of 311 net/frame failures. Repair costs were upwards of $80,000 for a single incident, and many of these incidents required stoppage of flight operations until net repairs could be completed. With a 3X improvement in net performance, capability readiness would increase with lowered maintenance costs for a wide variety of Navy vessels.

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred. © 2012

            

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    CTMA Connector - May 2012: DoD Maintenance Update

    May 2012

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/. To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with “subscribe CTMANewsletter” or “unsubscribe CTMANewsletter” in the message body.


    Attention: DoD Maintenance and Repair Facilities – Year-end Funding

    We have been given an 1 August deadline for the processing of any projects and funds MIPR’ed into the CTMA program.  This means any project statement of work and the actual MIPR form completed and coordinated with NCMS.  So we need to start working with you now to meet this deadline.  Please contact Chuck Ryan (chuckr@ncms.org) or Debbie Lilu (debral@ncms.org) for assistance.


    Reshoring Manufacturing: Returning Manufacturing Back to the United States 

    In pursuit of “lowest price,” many companies offshored more than was in their own self-interest. The resulting longer, less stable supply chains put at risk rapid resupply and the guarantee of getting the “real” part, as shown by the recent reports on counterfeit and used parts entering the supply chain.

    Fortunately, economic trends now support a trend to reshore. Boston Consulting Group forecasts that reshoring will rise rapidly over the next few years based on convergence of Chinese and U.S. net manufacturing costs by 2015. This trend was made more visible by President Obama’s Jan 11, 2012 Insourcing Forum in which Harry Moser, Founder and President of the Reshoring Initiative, actively participated.

    To help companies make better sourcing decisions and decide to expand or locate factories in the U.S., the Reshoring Initiative provides a deep understanding of the economic trends and a free software that helps companies objectively calculate sourcing decisions’ real current and forecast impact on their P&L. The software helps the user quantify the trade-off of low price or low labor cost vs. the benefits of sourcing closer to the customer and applies to 17 countries.

    More information can be found at www.reshorenow.org.


    We welcome the following companies/organizations into NCMS:

    The Procter & Gamble Company (www.pg.com)

    An American multinational corporation headquartered in downtown Cincinnati, OH who manufacturers a wide range of consumer goods.

    Onodi Tool and Engineering Company (www.onoditool.com)

    Manufacturer of metal, hydraulic, mechanical components and assemblies with capabilities to reverse engineer component parts, assemblies and complete vehicle systems. Also a custom manufacturer of prototype components, assemblies, tooling and machinery.

    Russells Technical Products, Inc. (www.russells-tech.com)

    A global supplier of environmental test systems

    Perfect Point, Inc. (www.ppedm.com)

    A manufacturer of EDM tooling

    Consumers Energy Company (www.consumersenergy.com)

    Regulated Electric and Natural Gas Public Utility with Distribution in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula Counties.

    Parker-Hannifin Corporation (www.parker.com)

    A leading worldwide manufacturer of motion and control technologies and systems, providing precision engineered solutions for a wide variety of mobile, industrial and aerospace markets.

    Chicago Coatings Group (www.chicagocoatingsgroup.com)

    Consultants of Coatings, Corrosion and Materials

    Goodrich Corporation (www.goodrich.com)

    A global supplier of systems and services to the aerospace, defense and homeland security markets with annual revenues of over $7B.

    Fraunhofer USA, Inc. (www.fraunhofer.org)

    A non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that performs applied research & development under contract to government and industry. Each research center is partnered with a major university in the USA and research focus is primarily on lasers, energy systems, diamond research, vaccines, automation and software.

    The University of Alabama (www.ua.edu)

    The University of Alabama (UA) is a comprehensive research university offering bachelors, master’s and doctoral degrees in 13 different colleges.

     


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2012

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    CTMA Connector for April 2012 DOD Maintenance Update

    April 2012

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/. To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with “subscribe CTMANewsletter” or “unsubscribe CTMANewsletter” in the message body.


    Following the 2012 CTMA Symposium, we announce the following Project Opportunities:

    Product Life Cycle Management for Aircraft Sustainment and Support

    The purpose of the project is to support the Sustainment Technologies for Aircraft Depot Maintenance configuration management of 3D design models for all modern aircraft and to leverage design re-use capabilities to reduce costs. In the current depot environment, engineering and production information is often insufficiently managed, and does not always incorporate knowledge of the true state of manufacturing or repair requirements. This state provides faulty baselines based on infeasible plans and, therefore, schedules, and provides skewed estimates of the resource requirements necessary to complete a given workload. With a Digital/Virtual Depot one can reduce cycle-times by using proven re-usable process for all maintenance and repair, along with simulating those work flow activities to optimize through-put. This would include resource models of shop layouts, equipment and capabilities of all Fleet Readiness Center facilities.

    Based on the following reasons FRC SW was chosen for this project on behalf of the entire FRC
    Command community:

    • FRC SW extensive efforts in support of critical F/A-18 life extension efforts which
      involves elaborate repair design and manufacture of complex CNC parts.
    • FRC SW extensive investment already made in Advanced Measurement Systems and
      Reverse Engineering Lab environment and connected to RDT&E.
    • FRC SW development and utilization of the 3MS process for creating validated 3D
      models from 2D blueprints for local manufactured items.

    The explicit goal is to use this investment to leverage best practices and replicate a PLM Enterprise roll out later for all FRC’s and NAVAIR.

    Interested participants should contact Dana Ellis, danae@ncms.org, (360)782-1370.

     

    Achieving Optimal Test Application Migration

    Depot repair activities throughout the Department of Defense (DoD) are dealing with the
    obsolescence of automated test equipment on a mammoth scale. A large percentage of existing test hardware used to diagnose, repair and resupply failed weapons system components is in need of replacement due to inability to support and repair the test equipment itself. An even larger problem encountered with addressing the test hardware obsolescence is the need to retain the Non-Recurring Engineering (NRE) that is already sunk cost in test application software that resides on the obsolete equipment. The cost related to the NRE is orders of magnitude more than the test hardware itself and offers ample opportunities where technology can be injected to mitigate those related costs.  Strategies for moving the existing test applications range from brute force application rewrites to attempting to use the same languages on the modern test platforms. All the strategies suffer from various test system nuances that have plagued the test industry for years, most of which are caused by the wide variance in computer to instrumentation communication and control scenarios that proliferate with provider and feature differentiation. Technologies that can provide a bridge from applications that are essentially locked to legacy hardware over to modern systems, using automated strategies, would provide cost savings in excess of the platform replacement costs themselves.

    This project includes the injection of 2 more technological advancements to the ConVEx toolset. First a legacy to modern test resource pre-allocator functionality and second an automated straight wire Interface Test Adapter designer. With the deployment of ConVEx in several depot environments, there has been ongoing analysis as to where further efficiencies can be accomplished to better automate the ConVEx legacy to modern test application retarget process. The analysis is showing that a predominant amount of the ConVEx practitioner’s time is spent in a process referred to as allocation. Two kinds of allocation are accomplished in transferring legacy applications to modern systems. They are resource allocation and path allocation. Resource allocation is the process of assigning appropriate instrument capability that can accomplish each signal functionality required in a test definition. Path allocation is the process of defining the wires and switches in the test station and test adapter that are to provide the connections from the test station resources to the UUT connection locations that are specified in the test definition. It should be clear that the 2 types of allocation are somewhat mutually dependent. For instance if a resource that can do a certain job is allocated and it is found that a path to the UUT cannot be provided from that resource then a different resource might need to be allocated. So the automated allocation process is iterative between resource and path allocation in the current implementation. Current data shows that for typically complex test applications, ConVEx practitioners can produce new test applications from legacy applications for their new test platform targets in 6 to 8 man weeks. This is a striking difference from a typical test application rewrite that could take anywhere from 6 to 12 man months. The goal for the new technology insertion would be to reduce the transition process further down to 3 to 5 man weeks, which is roughly a 40% to 50% decrease from current nonrecurring engineering costs when ConVEx is used. Using very conservative  figures this means approximately $50,000 in savings per test application. Depending upon the station and systems being transitioned there could be hundreds or thousands of test applications that are eventually transferred. That would mean overall cost savings from 10 to 100 million dollars that could be further mitigated when the technologies are implemented.

    Interested participants should contact Jeff Walker, Jeffw@ncms.org  (360)782-1370.

     

    Engine Reliability Data Error and Cost Reductions Through IUID Technology

    The USAF T56 engine Program Office has implemented Workscope Optimizing Tools since 2006. These tools recommend optimal repair workscopes based on the underlying reliability and cost of repair options. The success of the program in improving T56 reliability has been directly tied tothe quantity and quality of data collected at the depot and in the field through the use of the Maintenance In-Depth Maintenance Data Collection System (MIDCS) database within the USAF’s Data Repository Center (DRC). Valid reliability data has allowed for proper workscoping at the component level to optimize costs within each workscope.

    The benefits from this implementation have been substantial. The USAF has enjoyed a 25% reliability improvement through the use of the workscoping tool. The development of Workscope Optimization Tools is data-intensive. Indeed, the removal times and observed failure modes of numerous engine parts must be manually collected, not only at the depot, but also at Intermediate Repair sites. Manual data collection creates two significant problems. First, it introduces error through the incorrect recordings that are transcribed and entered into government systems. Secondly, it is expensive. Not only are serial numbers written down, but they are subsequently key-punched into databases. The burden this places on field units is substantial and consequently, requests to track additional engine parts are often rejected by the field simply because the data recording process is so labor-intensive.

    Under this project, the collection of engine component reliability data through IUID means will be piloted. Specifically, this project will:

    • Pilot, and if necessary, simulate the use of IUID on engine parts to support the Workscope Optimization Tool development process.
    • Measure the time savings associated with the use of IUID vs manual collection of engine data.
    • Measure and compare the error rates of manually and IUID collected data sets. In this regard, the project will refer to previous work that baselined the errors in the reliability data sets.
    • If appropriate, build a business case for the widespread adoption of IUID as a way to improve data quality and reduce the cost of data collection.
    • This will be accomplished on engines that are using the workscoping tools currently within the AMC and AFSOC commands.
    • IUID data will be downloaded directly into the USAF’s reliability MIDCS data base at each event. This will prevent the need for USAF personnel to document the component details at each removal event.

    This process will set the path for tracking components relevant to engine reliability and cost without burdening maintainers resulting in further cost savings from current implementation efforts. The developed program may also be implemented by other engine programs to further improve their reliability data for subsequent analysis.

    Interested participants should contact Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.

     

    DoD Airframe and Engine Fastener Removal – e-drill Cost Reduction and Process Improvement (e-CRPI)

    Aerospace fastener removal is a labor-intensive process with high damage rates. The e-drill is an alternative to the standard mechanical drilling process. Low productivity, high damage rates, repetitive motion injuries, and the FOD associated with thousands of drill shards were common and accepted. E-drill technology dramatically improves aerospace fastener removal operations.

    This project will produce a standard e-drill fastener removal specification package consisting of qualification test processes, test facilities, training specifications and training qualification tests, across all DoD aerospace platforms, including supervisor and operator training, field testing, and implementation support at seven major facilities including three Navy Fleet Readiness Centers (SW, E, S), all three Air Force Air Logistics Centers, and the Corpus Christi Army Depot.

    By targeting e-drill testing on the fasteners with the highest removal cost (labor, consumables, damage, and ergonomics) while factoring in quantity of removals, the project will deliver the following benefits:

    1. 50% reduction in labor costs on the targeted applications.
    2. 75% reduction in airframe damage-related costs, which include MRB costs and replacement of parts that are damaged beyond repair from mechanical drilling of fasteners.
    3. Reduced ergonomic risk factors when compared to conventional fastener removal methods including force, posture, vibration, repetition, compression, duration, and noise.
    4. Reduced FOD – the only FOD left by the e-drill is the fastener head and stem – the metal that is removed from the fastener during the e-drill process is captured within a closed loop vacuum, filtered, and recycled through the system.
    5. Reduced Cycle Time and Improved Material Readiness – by speeding up the fastener removal

    Interested participants should contact Bill Chenevert, billc@ncms.org, 734-995-7989.

    Intermittent Fault Detection & Isolation System (IFDIS)

    The Intermittent Fault Detection & Isolation System (IFDIS) is a tester that was specifically designed to fill the conventional ONE circuit at a time testing void. The IFDIS tests the LRU / WRA chassis wiring and identifies the precise location of each defect by monitoring ALL of the circuits in the Unit Under Test (UUT) individually, simultaneously and continuously (no scanning, sampling or multiplexing), detecting any intermittent event even as short at 50 nanoseconds (0.00000005 seconds). This quantum leap in test technology enables the chassis wiring problems to be easily repaired, as the root cause of the fault that drove the equipment item in for repair is accurately identified and isolated. Repairing the defect is usually trivial; finding the defect has always been, and continues to be, the problem. The proposed project is demonstrating that the IFDIS will efficiently and reliably detect and isolate the intermittent faults in the F-16 Weapon System Night Vision Data Transfer Unit (NVDTU). This will be accomplished by developing the needed hardware and software to continuously and simultaneously monitor ALL circuit paths in this Line Replaceable Unit chassis using the IFDIS, to detect and isolate to their precise location each intermittent circuit.

    This project will demonstrate that by using the IFDIS, the intermittent faults in the NVDTU can be detected, isolated and repaired. As a result, the reliability of the NVDTU will be substantially increased, the cost of maintaining the NVDTU will be reduced, and currently “unrepairable” NVDTUs will be repaired. Additionally, the time required to repair NVDTUs will be reduced (based on experience with other IFDIS tested LRUs). Utilizing the limited IFDIS capability at OO-ALC to test the MLPRF has already yielded an 18 times return on investment by returning to service MLPRFs that had previously been considered “unrepairable,” and by more than doubling the MLPRF reliability.

    One of the deliverables for this project is a testing specification for detecting intermittent faults.

    Interested participants should contact Dana Ellis, danae@ncms.org, (360)782-1370.

     

    Multibeam Laser Additive Manufacturing for Efficient Part Manufacture and Repair

    The project team proposes the development of Multiple Beam Laser Additive Manufacturing technology to address the shortfalls of today’s technology and to significantly broaden the applicability in DoD’s maintenance tasks. Multibeam LAM deploys several low power beams, each precisely controllable and with a minimum heat input thus enabling high precision, fine features and excellent surface finish. The single beams either work in parallel to scale productivity without sacrificing precision or are superposed in a single spot creating material and application specific tailored heat profiles that will significantly expand the applicable material spectrum. Precise control of the heat cycle during material deposition will allow processing a wide spectrum of high-strength steels and super alloys used in jet engines and gas turbines and will also be advantageous for the deposition of gradient materials.

    The innovative thrust areas of the proposed solution are:

    • -High productivity, high precision LAM through the use of multiple medium power lasers
    • Deposition of challenging materials, such as super alloys or gradient materials through optimized pre- and post heating by tailored spot geometries
    • Real time process monitoring for consistent quality
    • Easy to use, low cost system enabled by compact, low cost diode lasers integrated with the nozzle in a compact end effector.

    Interested participants should contact Bill Chenevert, billc@ncms.org, 734-995-7989.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2012

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    2012 CTMA Symposium Photos DOD Maintenance

    Over 200 people from the DoD and Industry participated in this year’s CTMA Symposium, which uniquely brought together leaders from each of the services, maintainers, industry users, and technology providers.  The Plenary Sessions heard perspectives from John Johns, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Maintenance Policy & Programs, Lorna B. Estep, Air Force Deputy Director of Logistics, Directorate of Logistics and Sustainment, Chris Lowman, Army Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff, Director of Maintenance, and Tony Guarino, Enterprise Logistics Solutions, Lockheed Martin.  Each of them discussed how their organization are finding more efficient and effective ways of doing business in a time of fiscal challenges, including their perspective on where technology can increase their effectiveness and reduce costs.

    [nggallery id=46]

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    CTMA Connector for March 2012 DOD Maintenance Update

    March 2012 – Symposium Edition

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/. To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with “subscribe CTMANewsletter” or “unsubscribe CTMANewsletter” in the message body.


    Announcing the Winner for the 2012 $100,000 OSD/NCMS Maintenance Challenge

    As part of the 2012 CTMA Symposium, we issued a call for project ideas in the Maintenance Technology Challenge.  A total of 18 projects were submitted, and judging by the Joint Technology Exchange Group Principal Representatives narrowed down the list to five.  Each of these five finalists presented their idea in front of the DoD Maintenance Executive Steering Committee and several Depot Commanders, who ranked each of the five, and led to the winning concept paper.  A summary of the five are included below:

    Winning Entry:  DoD Airframe and Engine Fastener Removal – e-drill Cost Reduction and Process Improvement (e-CRPI), presented by Doug Gerlach, Perfect Point Inc.

    Whether it's performed during regular heavy maintenance, modification, or service life extension programs, aerospace fastener removal is a labor-intensive process with high damage rates. Prior to Perfect Point's introduction of the e-drill in 2010, no alternative existed to the standard mechanical drilling process. Low productivity, high damage rates, repetitive motion injuries, and the FOD associated with thousands of drill shards were common and accepted. Perfect Point's e-drill technology dramatically improves aerospace fastener removal operations. Due to the current methodical pace of implementation, the DoD is delaying full realization of e-drill's cost reduction, process improvement, and health and safety benefits. Currently, the e-drill is being approved for use on the basis of one fastener in one application on one platform at a time. While important Local Process Specification (LPS) and Local Engineering Specification (LES) work is being done on numerous platforms across DoD (F-22, F-18, A-10), taking a broader approach will help accelerate adoption and eliminate costly duplicate development efforts.

    The project team is proposing a comprehensive DoD program to develop necessary engineering, process, and training specifications that can be applied across all branches and platforms. Investing in a top-down approach now will save DoD years in achieving full adoption, thereby saving hundreds of millions of dollars in fastener removal operational costs. The e-CRPI project will test target fasteners on multiple platforms at all seven primary air depots/bases, develop standardized engineering, process, and training specifications, and ultimately accelerate fastener removal cost savings across the entire DoD organization.

    This project will produce a standard e-drill fastener removal specification package consisting of qualification test processes, test facilities, training specifications and training qualification tests, across all DoD aerospace platforms, including supervisor and operator training, field testing, and implementation support at seven major facilities including three Navy Fleet Readiness Centers (SW, E, S), all three Air Force Air Logistics Centers, and the Corpus Christi Army Depot.

    By targeting e-drill testing on the fasteners with the highest removal cost (labor, consumables, damage, and ergonomics) while factoring in quantity of removals, the project will deliver the following benefits:

    1. 50% reduction in labor costs on the targeted applications.
    2. 75% reduction in airframe damage-related costs, which include MRB costs and replacement of parts that are damaged beyond repair from mechanical drilling of fasteners.
    3. Reduced ergonomic risk factors when compared to conventional fastener removal methods including force, posture, vibration, repetition, compression, duration, and noise.
    4. Reduced FOD - the only FOD left by the e-drill is the fastener head and stem - the metal that is removed from the fastener during the e-drill process is captured within a closed loop vacuum, filtered, and recycled through the system.
    5. Reduced Cycle Time and Improved Material Readiness - by speeding up the fastener removal

    A CTMA project is being organized around this capability, and interested participants should contact Chuck Ryan, chuckr@ncms.org, 734-995-4905.

     

    Top Five Finalist:   MRAP (Mine Resistant Ambush Protected) Maintenance Processes, presented by Randy Kirk, Aspire Solutions, Inc.

    The MRAP vehicle was incorporated into the DoD inventory to combat insurgent’s use of IED's (Improvised Explosive Device) during the Iraq conflict. The MRAP was designed with a v-shaped hull to deflect blasts away from the vehicle's core. While the MRAP has its issues, its core mission of saving lives as been very effective. Because of survivability rates, the MRAP has several different variants to serve specific mission purposes and goals. The MRAP was procured using rapid acquisition protocols enabling many vehicles to be obtained very quickly. Multiple manufacturers (BAE, IMG, and FPI) and many subcontractors were selected to produce various quantities and variants of the MRAP. Because of the rapid deployment requirements, the manufacturers focused on quantity. This often lead to variants not being constructed using the same specifications.

    Because of the many variations, the technical inspections are very time consuming and require significant manpower. Planners then take these results and develop a work scope for the particular vehicle and perform the research to order the necessary replacement parts or schedule the repair processes. Because no other existing DoD system has so many distinct configurations, existing processes and systems are not available. This requires manual, paper based processing of each MRAP further adding time and cost to the maintenance cycle. Because of the human element there are unavoidable mistakes and redundancies that also extend the time and cost.

    The team would utilize AP&IG (Automated Process & Inspection Guide) to automate the existing manual, paper based technical evaluations. AP&IG standardizes inspection processes by providing detailed guided work flows using actual pictures that walk the mechanic/inspector thru a set of procedures. Any discrepancy data is automatically standardized and part information (where available) automatically captured saving both the mechanic and planner significant time. Because it is an automated tool, once the data has been captured it can be shared throughout the enterprise ensuring any research (eliminate redundancy) is performed only one time. Available technical data can be displayed directly at the POU (point of use) eliminating the need for paper reference material and additional head knowledge/tips/notes can be included along with the TM's. The figure below illustrates the system.

    This technology would vastly streamline the existing technical evaluation and planning process (reduce flow days and manhours), standardize it for future employees (simplify training), and enable detailed root cause / trend analysis (large scale purchases for known issues). Currently, RRAD is projecting maintenance on 5000 MRAP's. Using very conservative assumptions including no material costs or economies of scale, results in a total savings of over $60 million or over $12,000 per MRAP.

     

    Top Five Finalist: Intermittent Fault Detection & Isolation System (IFDIS),presented by Ken Anderson, Universal Synaptics Corporation.

    One of the major cost drivers for the Department of Defense (DoD) is the maintenance of electronics and electrical systems that control and operate the wide-ranging inventory of weapons and weapon systems. Over $20 billion a year is spent maintaining electronics and electronic systems across the DoD. One of the highest contributing causes for these costs is age-related intermittent faults that result in No Fault Found (NFF) and Cannot Duplicate (CND) test results. Based on several reports and studies on the subject, it is estimated that roughly 50% of all observed and documented in operation equipment malfunctions result in repair actions that do not ultimately fix any problems (no material repair action or components replaced), yet these electronic units are returned to service, only to fail again in the same way another day.

    The Intermittent Fault Detection & Isolation System (IFDIS) is a tester that was specifically designed to fill the conventional ONE circuit at a time testing void. The IFDIS tests the LRU / WRA chassis wiring and identifies the precise location of each defect by monitoring ALL of the circuits in the Unit Under Test (UUT) individually, simultaneously and continuously (no scanning, sampling or multiplexing), detecting any intermittent event even as short at 50 nanoseconds (0.00000005 seconds). This quantum leap in test technology enables the chassis wiring problems to be easily repaired, as the root cause of the fault that drove the equipment item in for repair is accurately identified and isolated. Repairing the defect is usually trivial; finding the defect has always been, and continues to be, the problem. The proposed project is demonstrating that the IFDIS will efficiently and reliably detect and isolate the intermittent faults in the F-16 Weapon System Night Vision Data Transfer Unit (NVDTU). This will be accomplished by developing the needed hardware and software to continuously and simultaneously monitor ALL circuit paths in this Line Replaceable Unit chassis using the IFDIS, to detect and isolate to their precise location each intermittent circuit.

    This project will demonstrate that by using the IFDIS, the intermittent faults in the NVDTU can be detected, isolated and repaired. As a result, the reliability of the NVDTU will be substantially increased, the cost of maintaining the NVDTU will be reduced, and currently “unrepairable” NVDTUs will be repaired. Additionally, the time required to repair NVDTUs will be reduced (based on experience with other IFDIS tested LRUs). Utilizing the limited IFDIS capability at OO-ALC to test the MLPRF has already yielded an 18 times return on investment by returning to service MLPRFs that had previously been considered “unrepairable,” and by more than doubling the MLPRF reliability.

    With full implementation of the IFDIS, the Department of Defense will realize a significant return on investment and have advanced diagnostic capability to virtually eliminate the $2 billion a year annual expenditure due to No Fault Found. In ten years the DoD will be able to realize a conservative return on investment of $20 billion.

     

    Top Five Finalist: Multibeam Laser Additive Manufacturing for Efficient Part Manufacture and Repair, presented by Hans Herfurth, Fraunhofer USA, Center Laser Technology.

    Additive manufacturing has been recognized as a key technology to further improve efficiency in systems repair and maintenance. Originally developed for rapid prototyping application, additive manufacturing technologies have significantly expanded their field of application to part repair and low volume part manufacture. Currently, several additive manufacturing systems are installed at DoD depots and private sector facilities to support ongoing DoD maintenance efforts. Applications range from mold & core printing and manufacture of polymer jigs and fixtures for holding and masking to the build-up to complex metal parts made of super-alloys using the laser additive manufacturing (LAM) process. LAM technology allows to build metal parts from powder or to apply specific coatings to arbitrary shaped substrates and has therefore been generally identified as a promising approach to solve many of the existing challenges in part repair and low volume part production. Typically, high power lasers up to multiple kW are used to locally create solid metal deposits or layers of metallic material with cost effective productivity. Although current LAM technology is capable of producing rather complex metal parts with good accuracy and mechanical strength, several areas for further technology advancements have been identified that would clearly benefit DoD’s maintenance efforts. Key areas for improvement include process accuracy and reliability, applicable material spectrum, parts certified for aircraft-end use, and process control.

    The project team proposes the development of Multiple Beam LAM technology to address the shortfalls of today’s technology and to significantly broaden the applicability in DoD’s maintenance tasks. Multibeam LAM deploys several low power beams, each precisely controllable and with a minimum heat input thus enabling high precision, fine features and excellent surface finish. The single beams either work in parallel to scale productivity without sacrificing precision or are superposed in a single spot creating material and application specific tailored heat profiles that will significantly expand the applicable material spectrum. Precise control of the heat cycle during material deposition will allow processing a wide spectrum of high-strength steels and super alloys used in jet engines and gas turbines and will also be advantageous for the deposition of gradient materials.

    The innovative thrust areas of the proposed solution are:

    • -High productivity, high precision LAM through the use of multiple medium power lasers
    • Deposition of challenging materials, such as super alloys or gradient materials through optimized pre- and post heating by tailored spot geometries
    • Real time process monitoring for consistent quality
    • Easy to use, low cost system enabled by compact, low cost diode lasers integrated with the nozzle in a compact end effector.

     

    Top Five Finalist: Pilot Implementation of the Use of milTube to Electronically Communicate Maintenance and Operating Procedures at a Fraction of the Cost of Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals, presented by Lou Sciaroni, US Army AMRDEC.

    DOD is not adequately utilizing technology to teach maintenance and operating procedures. Youtube has become the way in which many (maybe most) people find out how to maintain and operate things they own. The Army has a capability called milSutie which contains a milTube capability. It is like Youtube, except that you have to use a CAC card to get access. Current paper processes to update maintenance processes are slow (they can take a year to get a pubs changes processed). Also, paper is not as efficient as video and voice in the training of a task. Additionally, these videos will allow for the capture of expert knowledge that often gets lost as soldiers/experts retire.

    This solution builds off of a solution made through the Army suggestion program titled “Interactive Maintenance and Operating Procedures; Electronically Communicating Maintenance and Operating Procedures at a Fraction of the Cost of Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals” which accompanies this proposal. This solution builds off that suggestion and is to create pilot videos from the AMRDEC VizLab on the CH-47 program to post on Youtube. This assumes DOD and the Army to change its culture and policies to allow videos and maintenance and operating procedures. The milTube has the capability for users to rate the videos, so that the accurate, quality videos will be used over the inaccurate, poor quality videos.

    The utilization of milTube for maintenance and operating procedures will create an expert knowledge base of operations and maintenance procedures, reduce training costs, improve retention of information, improved quality (reduction in errors made) in the operation and repair of equipment, result in faster maintenance times, quicker update of outdated or incorrect procedures, greater interoperability between DOD services, and create significant cost savings/avoidance.

     


    Highlights from the 2012 CTMA Symposium

    Over 200 people from the DoD and Industry participated in this year’s CTMA Symposium, which uniquely brought together leaders from each of the services, maintainers, industry users, and technology providers.  The Plenary Sessions heard perspectives from John Johns, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Maintenance Policy & Programs, Lorna B. Estep, Air Force Deputy Director of Logistics, Directorate of Logistics and Sustainment, Chris Lowman, Army Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff, Director of Maintenance, and Tony Guarino, Enterprise Logistics Solutions, Lockheed Martin.  Each of them discussed how their organization are finding more efficient and effective ways of doing business in a time of fiscal challenges, including their perspective on where technology can increase their effectiveness and reduce costs.

    For the first time, the Symposium featured a panel of Program Managers outlining their challenges. Moderated by LtGen, Mike Hough (Ret.), Former Head of Marine Corps Aviation, the panel included:

    • Army: Denny Haag, Army Product Manager, Light Tactical Vehicles
    • Marines: LtCol John Corbett, Robotic Systems Joint Program Office
    • Air Force: Bill Barnes, Deputy Chief, B-1 System Program Office
    • Industry: Shaugnessy Reynolds, Director Life CycleLogistics & Support, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems

    A second panel, composed of depot commanders, also outlined the challenges they are facing and how they are responding with deploying new technologies and capabilities.  This panel, moderated by RDML Steve Heilman (Ret.) included:

    • Army: COL Cheri Provancha, Commander, Letterkenny Army Depot
    • Navy: RADM (Select) Mark Whitney, Commander, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard
    • Air Force: Col Jeff Meserve, Commander of Aircraft Maintenance Group, Ogden ALC
    • Marines: Col Stephen Medeiros, Commander Barstow/Albany
    • Industry: Jim Henry, Vice President Government & Military Engineering, StandardAero

    Finally, 27 technology projects were briefed over 3 tracks, providing status updates, plans for deployment, and benefits either realized or expected.  All of the presentations from the Symposium will be made available in the near future.

     

    CTMA Technology Showcase

    Many thanks to Captain John Smajdek, CO for FRC-SW for hosting this years Symposium as well as the CTMA Technology Showcase held the day before the Symposium.  The Showcase featured 25 technology development organizations and allowed FRC-SW engineers, artisans and managers to see firsthand new technologies that can enhance their working capabilities.  In addition to Captain Smajdek, we would like to thank Chris Root and his team for making a success out of this years Symposium and Showcase.  Without the help and leadership support we received from FRC-SW, these events would not have been possible.

     


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2012

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    CTMA Connector - February 2012 DOD Maintenance

    CTMA Connector Logo

    February 2012

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/. To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with “subscribe CTMANewsletter” or “unsubscribe CTMANewsletter” in the message body.


    Two Separate Events; Two Networking Opportunities; Two Registrations; One Location

    1) CTMA Technology Showcase

    NCMS members are invited to participate in a Technology Showcase all day on Monday, March 26th at the Navy Fleet Readiness Center SW (FRC-SW) in the Island Club Dining Room. This is a great opportunity for members to display their technologies to their peers, Government attendees, and the engineers and artisans at FRC-SW. The event begins at 9:00 am (set up beginning at 7:30 a.m.) and goes until 4 p.m.

    This opportunity is open to all NCMS members at Community level or higher and the cost is $200 for a tabletop display.  (If you would like to become a NCMS Member, please download the application here.)

    These showcase events in the past have received high praises for their ability to target the Government’s technology needs and showcase members’ innovations. It’s an opportunity not to be missed!

    Registration and agenda for the Technology Showcase can be found at:

    http://www.ncms.org/index.php/programs/ctma/ctma-current/ctma-symposium-2012/technology-showcase/

     

    2) 2012 CTMA Showcase March 26-28, Navy Fleet Readiness Center Southwest, Coronado, CA   “Collaborate to Innovate”

    Plan to attend the 2012 CTMA Symposium as well.  A feature of this year’s Symposium is a panel discussion involving DoD Program Managers where PM’s from each of the services will review
    their overall technology needs with respect to maintaining and upgrading their capabilities, and how the CTMA program is relevant to their issues.  A second panel discussion will include commanding officers from several of the DoD depots discussing their maintenance operations, outline their current technology gaps, and present future technology needs.  The detailed agenda and registration for the 2012 CTMA Symposium can be found at: http://www.ncms.org/index.php/programs/ctma/ctma-current/ctma-symposium-2012/

     

    Further questions about either event can be directed to Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038


    CTMA Program Success Measures:

    Recently, we performed a thorough analysis of the CTMA program trying to quantify measures of success for the program.  This analysis showed that the CTMA program is responsible for:

    1. Actual cumulative benefits of $343 million to date, with projected cumulative benefits adding up to $7.7 billion through 2020.
    2. Overall, 76% of the CTMA projects have been implemented in DoD maintenance operations.  The rate increases to over 95% for projects with direct service funding.
    3. Two-thirds of projects initiated in the past 3 years have received additional service funding, showing project relevance and reach into the DoD.
    4. 52% of CTMA Projects have addressed reliability issues in weapon systems, with significant improvements to reliability and resultant savings.
    5. 49% of CTMA Projects have addressed Cycle Time Reduction. (many address both) Reductions in cycle time range up to orders of magnitude improvements.
    6. The number of industry partners has grown 50% in the past 3 years, bringing a wider variety of technology developments to DoD sustainment issues.

     


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2012

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    CTMA Connector - January 2012

    CTMA Connector Logo

    January 2012

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/. To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with “subscribe CTMANewsletter” or “unsubscribe CTMANewsletter” in the message body.


    At Least Three Reasons to Come to San Diego on March 25-28

    #1: Technology Showcase at the Navy Fleet Readiness Center Southwest, March 26.

    Expose your capabilities to the engineers and artisans at FRC-SW; Learn about the operations and needs at FRC-SW.  There are a couple of ways to participate.  NCMS member companies are invited to set up tabletop displays inside the FRC facilities to show-off their technologies to an audience of FRC-SW managers, engineers, and artisans.  Others are invited to view the FRC facilities as well as the displays.  Technologies of particular interest to FRC-SW include:

    • Chrome Plating
    • 2D to 3D Raster
    • Paint/DePainting
    • Laser
    • Shot Peening
    • Composites Repair
    • Training
    • Computer Integrated manufacturing Automated Programming
    • Cold Spray
    • Waste Stream to Electricity
    • Reverse Manufacturing
    • Product Lifecycle Management
    • Corrosion Repair
    • Fiberoptic Health/Repair
    • Measurement
    • Non-Destructive Inspection
    • Item Unique Identification (IUID)

    Further information can be found at: http://www.ncms.org/index.php/programs/ctma/ctma-current/technology-showcase/

     

    #2: The CTMA $100,000 Maintenance Technology Challenge

    Maintenance Leaders within the DoD will be reviewing and choosing a new $100,000 CTMA project of strongest interest to the DoD.  Here is a chance to get exposure with DoD leaders, and a chance to walk away from the CTMA Symposium with a funded project.  Concept papers are due to NCMS by March 1st, 2012.

    The selection criterion for project ideas includes the level of innovation, overall benefits, ability to deploy the technology within 12 months, DoD interest, and the strength of the team. Initial judging will be led by OSD with representatives from each of the services.  Five finalists will be given the opportunity to present their project ideas to the DoD Senior Sustainment Leader Panel, who will ultimately choose the winning team for the Challenge as part of the 2012 CTMA Symposium.  Details are found at: http://www.ncms.org/index.php/programs/ctma/ctma-current/the-2012-ncmsosd-maintenance-technology-challenge/

     

    #3: The 2012 CTMA Symposium, “Collaborate to Innovate”

    This years CTMA Symposium opens with a reception on Monday night, March 26 with plenary sessions starting early on Tuesday, March 27.  Perspectives will be given from DoD Senior Sustainment Leaders, and a Program Managers Panel with representatives from each of the services outlining their sustainment issues and how they are being addressed.  In addition we will feature our first Maintenance Technology Challenge competition.  On Wednesday, March 28, a Depot Commanders Panel will feature several Commanding Officers discussing their technology needs.   Project track sessions  with technology project presentations rounds out the Symposium.

    Networking activities include the opening reception on Monday, March 26, an Industry Tabletop Display during an evening reception on Tuesday, and for those of you needing more reasons to come to balmy San Diego, join us in a golf scramble on Sunday, March 25 at the FRC-SW club.

    More information and registration can be found at:

    http://www.ncms.org/index.php/programs/ctma/ctma-current/ctma-symposium-2012/


    US Army Robotics Requests Your Help

    The U.S. Army has posted a Market Survey request for the Engineering Squad Robot (ESR) to its PROCNET at http://contracting.tacom.army.mil/ssn/sources.htm. The survey is listed under Open Notices and Surveys with Deborah Hough as the Point of Contact. Two documents are available for downloading; a Microsoft Word document containing the survey document, and a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet containing the schedule, capability requirements, interoperability specifications, and information assurance requirements. All interested companies are invited to participate in the survey.

    The ESR will be a rugged robotic system weighing less than 20 lbs. threshold (T), 15 lbs objective (O), consisting of a robotic operator control interface, a robotic chassis platform with video capability, digital communications/audio relay modules that are adaptable to advanced sensors or mission modules, and the power supply. The ESR should possess Plug-N-Play capabilities with open software architectures allowing different payloads or modules that will enable a trained operator to remotely detect by visual or other sensors, and to confirm, mark, and neutralize Explosive Ordnances (EO). Furthermore, it may also be used for lane proofing and other combat engineer specific tasks, as well as providing support to infantry and military police operations such as urban reconnaissance. In a reconnaissance role, the ESR should detect, locate, identify, and support targeting of enemy forces. Future roles for the ESR will employ modules for other specific tasks as needed such as chemical hazard and contraband detection. The ESR should have a manipulating arm to provide increased capabilities to the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) in complex and urban terrain including confined areas and subterranean environments (i.e., buildings, bunkers, tunnels, sewers, caves, culverts, ditches, behind guardrails, and around bridge abutments).

    The purpose of this market survey is to solicit feedback from industry and potential offerors in regards to the Engineering Squad Robot (ESR) program.  The Government is drafting cost, schedule and performance requirements for a future formal Request for Proposal (RFP); this market survey is part of the requirements development and program planning effort.  From this market survey, the Government intends to 1) Gauge industry interest in both attending a future industry day and offering future proposals for this program; 2) Understand whether there are any potential commercial products that may meet this requirement and 3) Gain voluntary feedback and analysis from industry to advise the Government on technical feasibility, technology readiness leve
    ls, and cost and schedule realism, as well as any other feedback desired by industry, of the draft requirements contained therein.

    The NCMS Contact is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, 734-995-4930 .


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2012

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    The CTMA Connector December 2011 DOD Maintenance

    CTMA Connector Logo

    December 2011

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/. To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with “subscribe CTMANewsletter” or “unsubscribe CTMANewsletter” in the message body.


    DoD Partners with NCMS in $100,000 Maintenance Technology Challenge

    The Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Maintenance, Mr. John Johns, has issued the 2012 Maintenance Technology Challenge designed to introduce new technologies to DoD’s maintenance facilities that will help sustain materiel availability at reduced cost. Mr. Johns has tapped the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) Program, a unique collaboration between OSD and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) to administer the $100,000 challenge. Mr. Johns sees this as “a unique opportunity to drive innovation and maintenance technology insertion by leveraging the strong track record of the CTMA program and partnership with NCMS.” In driving in this direction, he has also emphasized “the need of bringing new, but proven, technologies from the commercial sector into DoD maintenance as a key element of a multi-pronged strategy to continue to produce the levels of materiel readiness required by our military forces, but at subs tantially reduced cost.”

    Concept papers are due to NCMS by March 1st, 2012. “We are looking for projects that demonstrate strong benefits not only to the DoD but to industry as well,” states Dr. Chuck Ryan, NCMS Vice President and co-director of the CTMA Program, he adds that “strong teaming with DoD maintenance facilities is also encouraged.”

    The selection criterion for project ideas includes the level of innovation, overall benefits, ability to deploy the technology within 12 months, and the strength of the team. Five finalists will be given the opportunity to present their project ideas to the DoD Senior Sustainment Leader Panel, who will ultimately choose the winning team for the Challenge as part of the 2012 CTMA Symposium, being held at the U.S. Navy Fleet Readiness Center Southwest in Coronado, CA, March 26-28, an annual NCMS symposium which showcases technologies being developed with DoD maintenance activities, and features briefings by senior DoD leaders around issues and plans for the sustainment of their fleets. In addition, a technology showcase will be hosted by FRC-SW presenting an opportunity for NCMS membership to demonstrate new technologies that may be of interest to the DoD. Up-to-date information on the Challenge, Symposium and Technology Showcase can be found at

    http://www.ncms.org/index.php/the-2012-ncmsosd-maintenance-technology-challenge/


    Plan to attend the 2012 CTMA Symposium, March 26-28, Navy Fleet Readiness Center Southwest, Coronado, CA   “Collaborate to Innovate”

    A wide variety of activities are being planned for this years CTMA Symposium.  On Monday, March 26, we start off with a Technology Showcase on site of the FRC-SW facilities where project teams set up tabletop displays of their technologies to an audience of FRC-SW managers, engineers, and artisans.  The Symposium plenary sessions start on Tuesday, March 27, with perspectives from DoD Senior Sustainment Leaders, and a Program Managers Panel with representatives from each of the services outlining their sustainment issues and how they are being addressed.  In addition we will feature our first Maintenance Technology Challenge competition.  On Wednesday, March 28, a Maintenance Activities Panel will feature several Depot Commanders discussing their technology needs, followed by track sessions  with technology project presentations.

    Networking activities include the opening reception on Monday, March 26, an Industry Tabletop Display during an evening reception on Tuesday, and for those of you so inclined, a golf scramble on Sunday, March 25 at the FRC-SW club.

    More information and registration can be found at:

    http://www.ncms.org/index.php/ctma-symposium-2012/

    Registration will begin in January 2012.


    NCMS/CTMA Project Wins Manufacturing Excellence Award

    The NCMS/CTMA program was awarded its tenth National Center for Advanced Technologies (NCAT) Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award at the 2011 Defense Manufacturing Conference (DMC) in Anaheim, CA. The award-winning CTMA team brought together several small companies including Gravikor, the Michigan Research Institute, and SpaceForm Welding Solutions as well as the U.S. Army PM Light Tactical Vehicles division and the Marine Corps Maintenance Center Albany. The project team’s objective was to develop solutions for lighter, stronger military vehicles, allowing for the utilization of the latest lightweight armor solutions and improving overall maintainability. The awarded project, “Deformation Resistant Welding of Space Frame Structures to Reduce Weight in DoD Ground Vehicles,” applied new innovations in welding techniques to dramatically reduce time and weight associated with traditional vehicle space-frame construction.

    The team created a design for a new cage structure that would completely replace the current body structure in the military’s ubiquitous HMMWV (Humvee) platform. The NCMS team scrapped traditional old-school welding techniques in favor of deformation resistance welding – an approach that produces atomically clean surfaces between metals to be joined. The result is a near-perfect surface bond with many benefits over the traditional approach:

    • Elimination of weld fillers cuts weight, corrosion targets, and weak spots
    • Deformation-welded surfaces offer a considerably stronger bond
    • Easily supports joining of unlike metals, such as aluminum and titanium
    • Fully compatible with advanced composite armor technologies
    • Entire weld process is nearly 1,000 times faster than the traditional method

    The solution is cost-feasible as well, requiring little additional equipment and practically zero added investment. The project demonstrated the potential for a substantial weight saving (~1,500 lbs) with a comparable protection level to the current FRAG 7 HMMWV.

    Other advantages through the use of the DRW Space Frame Design include:

    • ~50% reduction in required parts
    • Rapid manufacturing process for cage structure
    • Fully bolt in kit (no welding at the depot level)
    • Requires no major modification to current HMMWV chassis
    • Improved ingress and egress for end user
    • Increased rollover protection versus standard HMMWV

    The NCMS contact is Chuck Ryan, chuckr@ncms.org, 734-995-4905.


    CTMA Project seeks bids on equipment

    NCMS is forming a new project that will target the development of a performance testing system for ground combat vehicles. US Army TARDEC in Warren, MI, is now developing the test table. One aspect of the project is building an environmental enclosure for testing components over their full operating environment specifications, a safety cage, and a video system for safe observation during testing. The project scope also includes development of a track testing system. It does not include functional or performance testing of vehicle electronics. We are seeking interested companies who would like to bid on providing the equipment.  Further information is available from the NCMS contact, Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, (734) 995-4930.

     

    CTMA Project Opportunities: Man-Packable Ground Robotics

    Man-packable ground robots have over the last few years become an indispensable part of the U.S. defense combat arsenal. These systems serve Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR), IED disposal, and many other missions where they replace humans in hazardous situations. They are in short, ubiquitous. However, because of urgent needs, many systems were acquired without a strategy in place for interoperability and long term sustainment. The Department of Defense is now focused on driving future acquisitions from a comprehensive systems engineering foundation. Two of the most pressing factors are interoperability standards for the various mission kits and an architecture standard for controls, both of which are in development. The emerging project will evaluate both at the prototype level.

    The NCMS contact is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, (734) 995-4930.


     

    CTMA Project Wins Great Ideas Competition

    The CTMA project, “No-Mask Electroplating”, was awarded first place in the “Great Ideas Competition” at SAE’s 2011 DoD Maintenance Symposium and Exhibition in Fort Worth, Texas. The annual symposium brings together thousands of government and industry representatives to exchange ideas to improve maintenance practices and procedures.

    Modernization of metal electroplating with no-mask conforming anodes is an innovative NCMS R&D project that sought to address issues around electroplating such as the extensive time it takes to mask parts, inaccuracies, inefficiencies and working with plating baths which are highly toxic. NCMS collaborated with government and industry to find a single, powerful solution to eliminate masking labor, achieve faster plating times, and improve uniformity of deposits.

    The project resulted in a:

    • 95% reduction in pre-plating part preparation
    • 45% reduction in plating time
    • 50% increase in plating tank capacity, improving overall throughput
    • $2,220,000 in immediate annual savings from the pilot parts alone

    Collaborative participants on this award winning project included the Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD), the Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) Southwest and Advanced Tooling Corporation (ATC).  The team estimates that if No-Mask Conforming Anodes were deployed across the Department of Defense (DoD), over $50 Million in savings could potentially be realized with overall process improvement times of 35-50%.

    The positive impact on the environment is also substantial. No-mask conforming anodes are fully reusable. The technology completely eliminates the mountains of tape, wax and other maskants – all of which must be disposed of as hazardous waste, where even brief exposure could lead to serious health complications.

    A video outlining the project was created by the NCMS Educational Services’ team and can be found atwww.ncms.org under the multimedia tab.

    The NCMS contact is Bill Chenevert, billc@ncms.org, 734-995-7989.


    NCMS again wins best booth at the 2011 Defense Maintenance Symposium

    With a western theme, including a riding bull, we showcased 5 CTMA projects along with NCMS.

    The five project teams included:

    Thanks to Debbie Lilu and her team for a job well done.  Special thanks to Tod Eggler at TOPS for designing, building, setting up and breaking down the winning NCMS booth.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011

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    NCMS Electroplating Project Wins Great Ideas Competition

    "No-Mask Electroplating” Project Could Save the DoD Millions

    ANN ARBOR, MI – November 28, 2011. The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) “No-Mask Electroplating” Project was awarded first place in the “Great Ideas Competition” at SAE’s 2011 DoD Maintenance Symposium and Exhibition in Fort Worth, Texas. The annual symposium brings together thousands of government and industry representatives to exchange ideas to improve maintenance practices and procedures.

    Modernization of metal electroplating with no-mask conforming anodes is an innovative NCMS R&D project that sought to address issues around electroplating such as the extensive time it takes to mask parts, inaccuracies, inefficiencies and working with plating baths which are highly toxic. NCMS collaborated with government and industry to find a single, powerful solution to eliminate masking labor, achieve faster plating times, and improve uniformity of deposits.

    “The results of this project are nothing less than astonishing,” said Bill Chenevert, NCMS Program Manager for the project, “we took this 100 year old process and gave it a technologically advanced overhaul saving money, time and the environment.”

    The project resulted in a:

    • 95% reduction in pre-plating part preparation
    • 45% reduction in plating time
    • 50% increase in plating tank capacity, improving overall throughput
    • $2,220,000 in immediate annual savings from the pilot parts alone

    Collaborative participants on this award winning project included the Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD), the Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) Southwest and Advanced Tooling Corporation (ATC). The project was funded through NCMS’ Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program.

    The team estimates that if No-Mask Conforming Anodes were deployed across the Department of Defense (DoD) over $50 Million in savings could potentially be realized with overall process improvement times of 35-50%.

    The positive impact on the environment is also substantial. No-mask conforming anodes are fully reusable. The technology completely eliminates the mountains of tape, wax and other maskants – all of which must be disposed of as hazardous waste, where even brief exposure could lead to serious health complications.

    About NCMS:
    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, the largest cross industry collaborative Research & Development consortium in North America, is dedicated to driving innovation in commercial, defense, robotics and environmentally sustainable manufacturing. NCMS has over 25 years of experience in the formation and management of complex, multi-partner collaborative R&D programs, and is backed by corporate members representing virtually every manufacturing sector. For more information on NCMS, visit http://www.ncms.org/

    About CTMA:
    The lifesaving Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program is a Department of Defense supported NCMS initiative that ensures American troops and their equipment are ready to face any situation, with the most up-to-date and best-maintained platforms and tools on earth.

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    The CTMA Connector November 2011 DOD Maintenance

    November 2011

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/. To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with “subscribe CTMANewsletter” or “unsubscribe CTMANewsletter” in the message body.


    Announcing the 2012 $100,000 OSD/NCMS Maintenance Challenge

    As part of the 2012 CTMA Symposium, 25-29 March at the Navy Fleet Readiness Center Southwest (San Diego), we will be inviting selected ideas to be presented in front of the DoD Senior Sustainment Leadership during a plenary session for a chance to be selected for a $100,000 project award within the CTMA program.  Open to all NCMS member companies, this is your chance to explain your project ideas to top levels within DoD and to walk away with a funded effort.  This is a unique opportunity that is not available at any other conference or symposium.  Stayed tuned for further details as to how to submit your ideas.  For companies who are not current NCMS members, you can find out more information about membership at http://www.ncms.org/index.php/about-ncms/become-a-member/.  Any level of NCMS membership is eligible to participate in this Challenge.


    Plan to visit the NCMS/CTMA Booth at the Defense Maintenance Symposium, Fort Worth, November 14-17.

    Four projects are being featured at this years booth:

    Imaginestics – IUID for Legacy Parts

    Ecylpse International – Enhanced Wiring Integrity Systems

    ID Systems – Centralized Fleet Automated Management Systems

    Advanced Tooling Corporation – No Mask Tooling for Plating Baths

    Black & Rossi; Topline Technology Solutions – Enabling Logistical Interoperability

    While you are at the Maintenance Symposium, come vote for one of the three CTMA projects entered into Great Ideas Competition including:

    1. Automated Process and Inspection Guide
    2. Modernization of Metal Electroplating with No-Mask Conforming Anodes
    3. Composite Structure Inspection and Repair Preparation Cell (IRPC)

    CTMA Project Opportunities: Ground Combat Vehicle Test Program

    NCMS is forming a new project that will target the development of a complete performance testing system for ground combat vehicles. The project scope will include development of a test stand that will test performance parameters plus an environmental enclosure for performing tests over the full specified environment. Work scope may include evaluating and moving existing components. Those interested should contact:

    The NCMS contact is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, (734) 995-4930.


    Funding Available for Environmental Research and Development

    DoD’s Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) is seeking to fund environmental research and development in the Weapons Systems and Platforms program area. The Weapons Systems and Platforms program area supports the development of innovative technologies that reduce or eliminate the use of hazardous materials in production and maintenance processes, reduce hazardous waste streams, and better understand and mitigate emissions and other environmental impacts that result from DoD operations. SERDP is requesting proposals that respond to the following four focused Statements of Need (SON) in Weapons Systems and Platforms:

     

    • Non-Isocyanate Polymers for Military Topcoats
    • Ionic Liquids Technology
    • Environmentally Advantaged Submunitions
    • Application of Synthetic Biological Techniques for Energetic Materials

    Proposals responding to the Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 SONs will be selected through a competitive process.

    New this year, Federal organizations will submit pre-proposals online directly to SERDP. Pre-proposals from the Federal and non-Federal sectors are due by Thursday, January 5, 2012. The SONs and detailed instructions are available on the SERDP web site at www.serdp-estcp.org/Funding-Opportunities/SERDP-Solicitations.

     


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011

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    The CTMA Connector October 2011 DOD Maintenance

    October 2011

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies/organizations into NCMS:

    Pacific Northwest Defense Coalition (PNDC) (www.pndc.us)

    A non-profit member-funded industry association of companies in the defense and security industries, that fosters steady economic growth for the region and sustainable long-term profits for its members.

    University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) (www.ucla.edu)

    UCLA is one of the world’s great research universities, number 11 in London’s Times Higher Education rankings (2010-2011). Faculty includes Nobel LaureatesPulitzer Prize winners, multiple MacArthur fellows and scores of national academy members. Interdisciplinary teaching and research is a particular strength, with initiatives in the arts, stem cells and other biosciences, nanoscience, international studies and the environment.

    ANSYS, Inc. (www.ansys.com)

    ANSYS develops, markets and supports engineering simulation software used to foresee how product designs will behave and how manufacturing processes will operate in real-world environments. We continually advance simulation solutions by, first, developing or acquiring the very best technology; then integrating it into a unified and customizable simulation platform that allows engineers to efficiently perform complex simulations involving the interaction of multiple physics; and, finally, providing system services to manage simulation processes and data — all so engineers and product developers can spend more time designing and improving products and less time using software and searching for data.


    Plan to visit the NCMS/CTMA Booth at the Defense Maintenance Symposium, Fort Worth, November 14-17.

    Four projects are being featured at this years booth:

    Imaginestics - IUID for Legacy Parts

    Ecylpse International - Enhanced Wiring Integrity Systems

    ID Systems - Centralized Fleet Automated Management Systems

    Advanced Tooling Corporation - No Mask Tooling for Plating Baths

    While you are at the Maintenance Symposium, come vote for one of the three CTMA projects entered into Great Ideas Competition including:

    1. Automated Process and Inspection Guide
    2. Modernization of Metal Electroplating with No-Mask Conforming Anodes
    3. Composite Structure Inspection and Repair Preparation Cell (IRPC)

    CTMA Project Opportunities

    Enabling Interoperability in a NATO Environment; Maintenance and Repair Activities

     

    Having successfully completed the first phase of this effort, the CTMA team will endeavor to follow the same methods and protocols to facilitate interoperability of Maintenance and Repair activities in a Coalition Environment harvesting IUID data across US service components, US Maintenance Centers and NATO Maintenance Centers. This data will serve as the enabler to allow maintenance activities to be conducted within and across joint service as well as international coalition environments. The effort will result in a field evolution to showcase NATO interoperability. The project will test visibility and interoperability of data between a COTS/GOTS US information system, the NATO Maintenance and Supply Agency (NAMSA) Automated Information Systems (AIS) and the USMC Maintenance Centers at Albany, GA and Barstow, CA.  This visibility and these transactions would show basic functionality of Coalition Logistics Interoperability (a key logistics enabler in coalition operations) and serve as a cornerstone function as the USMC evolves to a fully functional Naval Logistics Integration (NLI) initiative in the Enterprise Sense and Respond environment.

    This effort will demonstrate a scenario depicting the coordinated physical movement of assets from an operational environment such as a NAMSA maintenance and repair facility, or the USMC Maintenance Centers at Albany or Barstow. The data structures describing the assets and the movement will be defined where necessary based on international standards. The relevant data messages will be created and distributed according to the scenario and the actual physical movement and change to the assets. The gaps in data, communication, or technical capability will be identified and addressed. Existing capabilities and emerging contingency tools will be incorporated in the process.

    The NCMS Contact is Debra Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.

     

    Precision Form Correction of Aircraft Fuselage Panels

    Laser Shot Peening is increasingly being used in commercial and military aircraft to improve the fatigue resistance of a variety of critical flight components.  In 2008, laser peening forming began commercial application with Boeing to shape the curvature for the thick sections of the large wing panels for the new 747-8 aircraft, helping enable it to become the world’s most efficient aircraft on a per passenger mile basis. This highly precise forming technology can be used to correctively shape components such as the F/A-18 701 wing skins and on a specialty basic for aircraft needing replacement wing and fuselage skins.

    In the proposed project, the team would work with NAVAIR to demonstrate and deploy laser shot peening corrective forming of the  F/A-18 701 skin panels in order to adjust as-manufactured panels to the required tolerance in shape.  Laser peening has the unique capability to generate controlled curvature and strain into panels including thick panels as used on wide bodied commercial aircraft wing skins and much thinner (0.050 inch thick) panels such as for aircraft fuselages including the F/A-18 701 skin.

    The NCMS Contact is Chuck Ryan, chuckr@ncms.org, 734-995-4905.


    Make plans next year for the 2012 CTMA Symposium

    26-29 March, San Diego


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011

     

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    VALMT Project Cited as Example of NCMS Collaboration in Automotive Engineering Online

    The Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools (VALMT) project was recently cited as a successful example of the NCMS cross-industry collaboration model which teams multiple organizations to share the costs and reap benefits of cutting edge R&D.

    The VALMT project team pioneered an innovative process in establishing a new methodology in volumetric error compensation for large machine tools.  The costs for current assembly practices of measuring and fitting are substantial; reducing the amount of reworking of machined parts during onsite vehicle assembly will save the Department of Defense (DOD) and the commercial aircraft industry millions of dollars.

    VALMT has been honored with a Defense Manufacturing Award and an R&D 100 Award.

    From the article:

    ...NCMS is without doubt the U.S. leader in forming and managing complex, multipartner, cross-industry collaborative R&D programs. NCMS provides the tools that allow its members to collaborate.

    Full Article as seen in Automotive Engineering Online

    Read More

    Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) Keyport Honored with Defense Manufacturing Award for DOD Maintenance

    NCMS Vice President Chuck Ryan recently visited the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) Keyport, to honor their work on the Automated Robotic Blade Stripping System (ARBSS) project. The ARBSS project was awarded a Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award presented by the National Center for Advanced Technologies (NCAT) for outstanding cooperative efforts on technology development between government, industry and academia.

    James Van Antwerp, Division Technical Director, NUWC Keyport. , Dr. Chuck Ryan, Captain S. E. Iwanowicz, Commander, NUWC Keyport and Pat Bergan, Laser Engineering Manager NUWC Keyport

    NUWC Keyport was part of an NCMS team which included Koops Inc., Naval Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) East, Penn State Applied Research Laboratory, General Lasertronics Corporation, Sikorsky Aircraft Company, to create an innovative solution for the refurbishment of helicopter blades.

    Dr. Chuck Ryan, Pat Bergan, Laser Engineering Manager NUWC Keyport, and Captain S. E. Iwanowicz, Commander, NUWC Keyport

    FRC East refurbishes up to 150 helicopter rotor blades each month. Prior to ARBSS, technicians removed the topcoat of paint using pneumatic hand orbital sanders. This slow, error-prone process demands hours of tedious labor in a sweltering, hazardous environment while wearing protection equipment to avoid toxic dust inhalation. Stress injuries, fatigue, and lost time are significant problems.

    Determined to improve this process with advanced laser and vision systems, the NCMS-managed ARBSS team developed a proven automated robotic laser paint stripping technology that strips helicopter blades 75% faster than traditional methods, with practically zero error. The precision required stripping only the paint of a blade while leaving the primer coat intact thereby eliminating damage or wear to the substrate. This process is expected to save $900,000 annually, eliminates the generation of secondary hazardous waste, and provides an unprecedented level of safety and comfort for the maintainers.

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector September 2011 DOD Maintenance

    September 2011Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    Plan to visit the NCMS/CTMA Booth at the Defense Maintenance Symposium, Fort Worth, November 14-17.

    Four projects are being featured at this year's booth:

    Imaginestics - IUID for Legacy Parts

    Ecylpse International - Enhanced Wiring Integrity Systems

    ID Systems - Centralized Fleet Automated Management Systems

    Advanced Tooling Corporation - No Mask Tooling for Plating Baths

    While you are at the Maintenance Symposium, come vote for one of the three CTMA projects entered into Great Ideas Competition including:

    1. Automated Process and Inspection Guide
    2. Modernization of Metal Electroplating with No-Mask Conforming Anodes
    3. Composite Structure Inspection and Repair Preparation Cell (IRPC)

     

     

     

    For companies exhibiting at the Maintenance Symposium, NCMS member company, TOP, Inc., can provide booth transportation services, including booth setup and breakdown.  Contact Todd Eggler at TOP for more information, todd@cwsmail.com, 507-273-7938.

     


    If you are at the Materials Science & Technology 2011 Conference:

    Come see Connie Philips present the CTMA-project brief entitled "Laser-Based Material Deposition, Consolidation, & Removal Technologies:Road to Adoption" .  Connie will outline the advances made by the Additive Manufacturing project team, and what steps are being taken to more quickly bring this far-ranging technology onto the production floor.  The brief will be at the Mechanical Properties of Additive Manufactured Materials and Components session on Tuesday, October 18 at 10:20 am.  Further information can be found at http://www.matscitech.org/.


    CTMA Project Extension: Metal Finishing Development Program Phase II

    (DoD Partners:Corpus Christi Army Depot; Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center; Navy Fleet Readiness Center SW)

    Phase II of the highly-successful Metal Finishing Development Program is being launched.  In Phase I, a 5 module, 3½ hour Computer Based Training (CBT) course in basic hard chrome plating was developed and made available to the participating DoD Partners.  This course uses a newly published Hard Chrome Training Handbook developed under a separate EPA grant as its companion reference text.

    The objective of Phase II is to expand the learning experience into a real games-based learning approach. Phase II allows platers (both new and seasoned alike) through computer simulation to run a plating process that allows them to select parts, plate the parts, vary parameters (anode distances, current, masking, current diverters/robbers), observe results and make adjustments to improve the process.  Platers are able to “learn by doing” in an instructive, engaging and entertaining way on how best to electroplate from a cost, quality, safety and environmental viewpoint.  What made this games-based simulation possible was being able to adapt some powerful electro-chemistry process simulation software, originally developed by Elsyca for commercial purposes, into a learning tool.  The modified software generates results that are true to life and accurate for the components chosen to simulate.

    The plan is to integrate/enhance the simulation software with Flash animations, tutorials, etc. to make the simulated plating shop experience as representative of the real world as possible for the learner.  Additionally, troubleshooting modules (based on real life experiences of the depots) are being developed to supplement the simulation.

    The NCMS Contact is Bill Chenevert, billc@ncms.org, 734-995-7989.

     


    Make plans next year for the 2012 CTMA Symposium

    26-29 March, San Diego


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011
    Read More

    The CTMA Connector August 2011- DOD Maintenance

    August 2011Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies/organizations into NCMS:

    Honeywell Process Solutions division of Honeywell International

    (http://hpsweb.honeywell.com)

    Honeywell Process Solutions is a division of Honeywell Automation and Control Solutions (ACS) and has been a pioneer in automation control for more than 30 years.


    CTMA Project Completion: Laser Coating Removal for Helicopter Blade Refurbishment

    (DoD Partners: Navy Fleet Readiness Center East, Naval Underseas Warfare Center Keyport)

    To satisfy operational needs, Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) East must refurbish up to 150 main helicopter rotor blades each month. During blade refurbishment, workers remove the topcoat of paint using manually-operated, air-driven orbital sanders. The process requires extensive, tedious labor in a dusty, uncomfort­able environment. As illustrated in Figure 1, personnel must wear cumbersome and costly personal protection equipment to avoid dust inhalation due to toxic compounds in the coatings. Personnel complain of repetitive stress injuries and fatigue, and lost time is significant. Hand-sanding with air-driven orbital sanders often leads to substrate damage resulting in additional delays (Figure 2). Until this project, manually-controlled sanding was the only coating removal method approved for blade refurbishment operations at FRC East.

    The Integration of Laser Coating Removal for Helicopter Blade Refurbishment project was initiated to:

    • Evaluate economic efficacy of alternate stripping technologies and down-select the most promising.
    • Develop and execute a test program to qualify the selected stripping process.
    • Develop a performance specification for a practical and economical blade stripping system.
    • Design, fabricate, and implement the specified Automated Rotor Blade Stripping System (ARBSS) at FRC East.

    This project resulted in the approved use of automated laser paint stripping for thin composite helicopter rotor blades using high-speed process feedback to protect the substrate. The feedback system relies on color recognition to selectively strip topcoat while preserving primer and substrate, thereby ensuring substrate integrity. The process strips a blade in less than one-third the time compared to conventional techniques, eliminates the generation of secondary hazardous waste, and provides an unprecedented level of safety and comfort for the maintainers.

    The system was installed at FRC East in June 2009 and is currently stripping rotor blades (Figures 3 and 4). The project has demonstrated the ability to successfully implement a set-and-forget automated blade stripping system, and has involved industry partners to ensure further commercialization and dissemination of the technology. The successful implementation of this system represents a leap in both laser stripping and automated system technology.

    Figure 1.  Conventional Helicopter  Stripping Process     

    Figure 2.  Blade Damage from Orbital Hand Sanding

     

    Figure 3.   ARBSS at FRC East Prepared to Strip Rotor Blade

    Figure 4.   Operator Control Room

    The technologies developed and proven in this effort can now be readily applied to a broad array of composite and metal structures throughout the Department of Defense (DoD) that are costly to refurbish, such as aircraft wings, stabilizers, and fuselages.

    The project promises numerous benefits to both warfighters and to those who support them. Specifically, helicopter rotor blade stripping time is reduced from 22 hours/blade to 8 hours/blade, and will be further reduced to <3 hours/blade with a planned laser upgrade. The reduction in processing time will enable FRC East to boost throughput in order to meet operational needs.

    The quantitative benefits are considerable. The per unit repair cost would be reduced from $1,188.14/blade to $222.53/blade. With a production rate of 940 blades per year ($908K annual savings), the Phase II system would generate a straight line payback of 1.54 years. Additionally, the use of real-time sensor feedback to control stripping will prevent any inadvertent secondary damage to the blade, eliminating any additional delays.

    The FRC East labor normally expended to strip rotor blades can now be put to use on other immediate warfighter refurbishment activities of critical need to the warfighter.

    The blade stripping maintainers who support the warfighter will benefit through elimination both of repetitive stress injuries and the need to wear personal protective equipment, which is hot, cumbersome, and difficult to work in.

    Laser stripping technology eliminates secondary waste generation and reduces mass of effluent to less than the mass of coating removed, and thus offers both environmental and worker health and safety benefits.

    The project has brought the state-of-the-art of both laser stripping and robotic system integration to a level in which it is readily available for transition to other DoD applications, such as stripping of flight control surfaces and many other refurbishment activities.

    NCMS Contact is Doyle Maleche, doylem@ncms.org, 360-782-1370.


    Plan to visit the NCMS/CTMA Booth at the Defense Maintenance Symposium, Fort Worth, November 14-17.

    Four projects are being featured at this years booth as we try to regain best booth honors taken from us last year by "Big Ass Fans".  With a western theme, our booth includes:

    Imaginestics - IUID for Legacy Parts

    Ecylpse International - Enhanced Wiring Integrity Systems

    ID Systems - Centralized Fleet Automated Management Systems

    Advanced Tooling Corporation - No Mask Tooling for Plating Baths


    Make plans next year for the 2012 CTMA Symposium

    26-29 March, San Diego


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011

     

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector July 2011- DOD Maintenance

    July 2011Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies/organizations into NCMS:

    Osterhout Design Group (www.osterhoutgroup.com)

    Development and manufacture of commercial and DoD electronics devices.

    Emerson Process Management LLLP (www.emersonprocess.com)

    Emerson is a diversified global manufacturing and technology company offering a wide range of products and services in the areas of network power, process management, industrial automation, climate technologies, and tools and storage businesses. Recognized widely for our engineering capabilities and management excellence, Emerson has approximately 127,700 employees and 240 manufacturing locations worldwide.

    New Mexico Computing Applications Center (NMCAC) (www.nmcac.net)

    The NMCAC provides innovative and effective solutions to complex challenges by creating partnerships between businesses and organizations that include Sandia and Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico's institutions of higher education, and New Mexico's forward-looking state government. This network draws on the full range of talent in the State while also driving progressive education, workforce and community development efforts that are critical to successfully growing high-tech businesses.


    CTMA Project Extension: Validation of Functional Trivalent Chromium Plating Process

    Project results to date have validated the trivalent chrome process ablility to successfully pass several key tests. The coating performed comparably to hexavalent chrome for thickness, hardness, adhesion and hydrogen embrittlement. Additionally, the trivalent chrome plating bath tests showed no signs of residual hexavalent chromium after more than 1,400 amp/hrs of use, which indicates the new process does not appear to generate harmful hexavalent chromium ions impacting the environment and worker safety. While initial wear tests at high loads were not favorable, the team strongly believes the failure was due to an unusual microstructure (less dense and columnar in nature) observed in the trivalent chrome samples. The unusual structure introduced various failure modes including cracking of the columnar deposits and liberated columns of material functioning as abrasive particles during the wear tests, particularly during the higher loads wear testing. The cause of the unusual microstructure was felt to be due to a less than optimized process. As such, the project team will perform a “Hull Cell Experiment” to identify more optimal process parameters (e.g., current density and bath temperature) to address the unusual microstructure issue that caused wear test failure.

    NCMS Contact is Bill Chenevert, billc@ncms.org, 734-995-7989.


    Three CTMA Projects Selected for Great Ideas Competition at the DoD Defense Maintenance Symposium, Fort Worth, November 14-17.

    Half the projects being presented at the Great Ideas Competition this year are part of the CTMA program.  Come to the Symposium and vote for one of these projects:

    1. Automated Process and Inspection Guide

    Overhaul and repair inspections are paper based, conducted over three shifts, not co-located, and are performed by multiple individuals.  This leads to no standardization of data capture and inspection processes.  This project is demonstrating the benefits of replacing inefficient paper-based processes with mobile data capture devices combined with COTS software to guide inspectors.  Anticipated benefits include:  inspection cost reduction, reduced repair cycle time, increased industrial capacity and enhanced failure and trend analysis.

    1. Modernization of Metal Electroplating with No-Mask Conforming Anodes

    Thousands of metal parts make up expensive vehicles, aircraft, and machinery; some moving, some stationary, all exposed to forces of corrosion and wear. Electroplating is critical to making them perform better and last longer.  Unfortunately, the basic activity of electroplating has not changed substantively in over 100 years. Carefully hand mask areas of a part you wish to protect from plating, and dip in an electrified tank for several hours. Time consuming (masking takes hours and is highly error prone), inefficient (as much as 90% of the electrical power is wasted), and dangerous (plating baths are highly toxic). This CTMA project addresses all issues with a single, powerful solution: eliminate masking labor, achieve faster plating times, and improve uniformity of deposits.

    1. Composite Structure Inspection and Repair Preparation Cell (IRPC)

    IRPC is a direct response to reducing sustainment cost by increasing the availability and reliability of critical composite structures through replacement of artisan dependant inspection and repair operations with computer based technology. The current manual practice includes tap testing as the detection method, manual scarfing to remove the defect, and manual patch preparation, all contributing elements of inaccuracy and waste. This CTMA project is identifying and demonstrating a suite of integrated technologies to achieve this goal. The baseline artifact selected for evaluation of the technologies is the C-130 Radome although the technique can be applied to new aircraft program materials to identify manufacturing defects as well as structures being refurbished. Defects include delamination, physical damage, and presence of moisture.


    New ASTM Additive Manufacturing Specification Answers Need for Standard Interchange File Format

    The additive manufacturing industry will greatly benefit from a new ASTM International standard that will allow computer- aided design programs, scanners and 3D graphical editors to communicate with 3D printers and additive manufacturing equipment. The standard will answer the growing need within the industry for a standard interchange file format that can work with features such as color, texture, material, substructure and other properties of a fabricated target object.

    The new standard, ASTM F2915, Specification for Additive Manufacturing File Format (AMF), was developed by Subcommittee F42.04 on Design, part of ASTM International Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies.

    “As additive manufacturing technology is quickly evolving from producing primarily single-material, homogeneous shapes to producing multi-material geometries in full color with functionally graded materials and microstructures, there is a growing need for a standard interchange file format that can support these features,” says Hod Lipson, Ph.D., associate professor, Cornell University, and an F42.04 member. “ASTM F2915 is XML-based, covers these new capabilities and allows for expansion.”  According to Lipson, ASTM F2915 will provide engineers, architects, artists and anyone involved in 3D design and printing to seamlessly transition from design to physical printed object, independent of the specific software or printer hardware being used.  “This is similar to the PDF file format that allows any document to be viewed and printed regardless of the display and printer being used,” says Lipson. “The availability of such a standard is key to growth of the additive manufacture industry and the proliferation of new applications.”

    Lipson notes that geometric design software vendors and 3D printer manufacturers will be the primary users of ASTM F2915, but he also says that anyone involved in the design, aggregation, fabrication and consumption of 3D objects using new additive manufacturing technologies would benefit from use of the new standard.  A website with files, documentation and forums for ASTM F2915 is located at www.stl2.com.

     


    Make plans next year for the 2012 CTMA Symposium

    26-29 March, San Diego


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011
    Read More

    Volumetric Accuracy Project Highlighted in Aerospace Manufacturing Magazine

    Volumetric Compensation Technology (VEC) was highlighted in the June 29 issue of Aerospace Manufacturing Magazine feature, Machine tools meet new materials. VEC is the commercial product developed from the Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools (VALMT) collaborative project which collected a Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award (2009) and a R&D 100 Award (2010).

    The VALMT project team pioneered an innovative process in establishing a new methodology in volumetric error compensation for large machine tools which will save the Department of Defense (DOD) and the commercial aircraft industry millions of dollars.

    NCMS teamed private industry (Automated Precision Inc., The Boeing Corporation, Siemens Energy and Automation and MAG Cincinnati Machine, LLC) and the Department of Defense (U.S. Air Force Logistics Center, Naval Foundry and Propeller Center, U.S. Navy Fleet Readiness Center East) for the VALMT project, to quickly develop the groundbreaking technology affordably, and with less risk than alternative “go it alone” R&D methods.

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector June 2011 DOD Maintenance

    June 2011Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies/organizations into NCMS:

    The National Center for Technology Advancement (NCTA) (www.tnctech.org)

    The National Center for Technology Advancement (NCTA) and its subsidiary organizations apply and extend the application of digital sciences for enhanced development and empowerment through technology innovation. Serving at the intersection of governmental, educational, and private sectors, the NCTA was created to act as the umbrella non-profit modeled on the success of its first subsidiary, the National Agribusiness Technology Center (NATC), across multiple domains.

    The Ohio State University/ Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) (www.osc.edu)

    The Ohio Supercomputer Center is a statewide resource that provides supercomputing services and computational science expertise to Ohio university researchers as well as Ohio industries. OSC has provided these services for over twenty years, and in fiscal year 2008 we estimate that Ohio researchers that use OSC have won over $85M of research funding for Ohio – a return on investment of 17:1.

    General Dynamics - OTS ( www.gd-ots.com)

    General Dynamics-Ordnance and Tactical Systems empowers the U.S. military and its allies with an extensive range of overarching product segments.. applied across all levels of strategic and tactical operations.


    CTMA Project Extension: RARE Parts through “Rapid Manufacturing & Repair” (Phase III)

    DoD participants:  Fleet Readiness Center East; 2. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast; Trident Refit Facility, Kings Bay; Oklahoma City Air Logistic Center; Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Keyport; Anniston Army Depot; Corpus Christi Army Depot;Tobyhanna Army Depot; Portsmouth Naval Shipyard; Naval Foundry & Propeller Center; Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard;  NAVAIR  China Lake

    This active project is focused on advancing the maturation of a new transformational manufacturing industry, Additive Manufacturing (AM), for use within DoD maintenance activities through technology insertion, technology-knowledge deployment, and standards formation.  DoD and industry continue to join the project team with the additions of Corpus Christi Army Depot and Baxter Healthcare.  Maintenance activities are acquiring Additive Manufacturing equipment now with their own funding and learning through team involvement how to best implement the technologies within their depots.

    Through the efforts of this team and with the AM community at large, members are involved in ASTM standards generation through ASTM F-42 Committee.  The pace of national and international activity has quickened over the past two years, with the establishment of the ASTM F-42 Committee (over 120 members world-wide), and with the adoption of AM by an increasing number of DoD Maintenance activities.  We are on the cusp of sweeping changes in how DoD will perform manufacturing and repairs.  With the additional 20 months time, the project team will continue these current activities, will evaluate new AM software that enables .stl file accommodations uniquely for varying AM processes to produce any 3D AM part design, and will evaluate and perform Design of Experiment studies on new lower-end machines to measure their fabrication capabilities against the team’s current AM equipment capabilities.  If these lower end machines (SLA and FDM types) allow users to make accurate 3D structures, albeit more slowly, and with material properties equal to currently utilized SLA and FDM machines, low quantity tooling and masking could be economically made by any depot or in the field on these small, portable and relatively inexpensive machines.

    Additionally, the team continues to follow the materials development occurring for EOS and ARCAM metals processes, favored by NAVAIR and the Air Force, and the polymers and rubber-like materials that can produce gaskets, plugs and seals on the Objet Connex, possibly for use in field repair.  Reverse engineering studies comparing inspection/software systems using a standard test piece, Amber, continues as well.   Team members having acquired new inspection systems will use Amber to assess the accuracy and fidelity of their systems.

     


    NCMS Partners with Navy to promote Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) through remotely operated vehicle challenges

    NCMS is working with the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) Division Keyport to manage its Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) program focused on Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) on the Kitsap Penisula. The cooperative agreement between NCMS and NUWC Keyport will support the Department of Defense’s (DoD) mission of scientific outreach and education in working to nurture future scientists capable of providing support to the development of DoD identified critical technologies.

    The current lack of robotics-specific degreed engineers and technicians poses a serious threat to future development and deployment of robotic and unmanned systems which are integral to ensuring the safety of the warfighter. This program will inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers by engaging students, kindergarten through college, in STEM-related hands-on learning activities using Navy content, preparing them for future employment in ROV disciplines, supporting academic institutions or the naval contractor community. Finally, it will help employ, retain and develop naval STEM professionals to support this technologically advanced sector.

    NCMS will leverage its experience in workforce training and interactive games-based learning to ensure that an educated and well-prepared ROV workforce is available to meet both naval and national competitiveness needs.

    The NCMS contact is Doyle Maleche, doylem@ncms.org, 360-782-1370.


    Make plans next year for the 2012 CTMA Symposium

    26-29 March, San Diego


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011
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    The CTMA Connector May 2011

    May 2011

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies/organizations into NCMS:

    OBD Solutions (www.obdsol.com) Leader in advanced On Board Diagnostics (OBD II) technologies for vehicles.


    CTMA Project Completion: Integrating Sensors and Predictive Maintenance Systems with Performance Support Technology to Increase CH-53 Readiness and Reliability

    DoD participants:   PMA-261 (CH-53E Program Office);  HMT 302 Marine Corps Air Station – New River, NC;  Fleet Readiness Center East; Fleet Readiness Center Southeast

    CH-53E Helicopter readiness rates are declining due to maintenance groundings associated with high operational tempo, component breakdown, and age-related problems, such as structural fatigue and rotor wear and tear.  Each CH-53E helicopter requires more than 40 hours of maintenance for each flight-hour of operation. There are approximately 145 operational CH-53E airframes in the fleet. PMA-261 spends roughly $500M per year on fleet maintenance.

    The purpose of this project was to join the Integrated Mechanical Diagnostic System (IMDS), a Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS), with an Electronic Performance Support System (EPSS) to provide CH-53E helicopter maintenance technicians with a seamless prognostic, diagnostic, and repair suite that measurably increases the readiness and availability of the aircraft while reducing or eliminating associated maintenance expenditures.

    The suite is composed of three main consoles: System Developer, Maintenance Control/Admin, and Maintainer. The System Developer console is used to make modifications to the system such as technical manual updates and procedural changes. The Maintenance Control/Admin console is used for creating and managing user accounts, as well as receiving updates from the System Developer console. Finally, the Maintainer console is used by the maintainer as a point-of-maintenance tool that aids maintainers to troubleshooting, repairing and maintaining the various systems on the CH-53E.

    Achieving a 3% reduction in maintenance costs through faster and more accurate troubleshooting could result in a $15.3M in annual cost savings at PMA-261. Findings suggest that savings could be high as $50M – if 10% maintenance cost avoidance is achieved.

    NCMS Program Manager is Doyle Maleche, doylem@ncms.org, 360-782-1370.


    Thanks for your participation in the 2011 CTMA Symposium

    Plenary speakers put forth their needs and requirements, and the deputy commanders panel spelled out technology needs and deployment practices.  We would like to thank RW Appleton and Co, Inc., and Technical Objectives Professionals, LLC (TOP Inc.) for their sponsorship of the tour of the Marine Corps Museum, which is well worth your time.  The 2012 CTMA Symposium is tentatively scheduled for March 26-29 at the Fleet Readiness Center Southwest near San Diego.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011
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    Koops Honored with Defense Manufacturing Award

    NCMS Vice President Chuck Ryan recently visited NCMS member Koops Inc., to honor their work on the Automated Robotic Blade Stripping System (ARBSS) project. The ARBSS project was awarded a Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award presented by the National Center for Advanced Technologies (NCAT) for outstanding cooperative efforts on technology development between government, industry and academia.

    Koops was part of a NCMS team which included the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) – Keyport, Naval Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) East, Penn State Applied Research Laboratory, General Lasertronics Corporation, Sikorsky Aircraft Company,  to create an innovative solution for the refurbishment of helicopter blades.

    FRC East refurbishes up to 150 helicopter rotor blades each month. Prior to ARBSS, technicians removed the topcoat of paint using pneumatic hand orbital sanders. This slow, error-prone process demands hours of tedious labor in a sweltering, hazardous environment while wearing protection equipment to avoid toxic dust inhalation. Stress injuries, fatigue, and lost time are significant problems.

    Determined to improve this process with advanced laser and vision systems, the NCMS-managed ARBSS team developed a proven automated robotic laser paint stripping technology that strips helicopter blades 75% faster than traditional methods, with practically zero error. The precision required stripping only the paint of a blade while leaving the primer coat intact thereby eliminating damage or wear to the substrate. This process is expected to save $900,000 annually, eliminates the generation of secondary hazardous waste, and provides an unprecedented level of safety and comfort for the maintainers.

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    The CTMA Connector April 2011

    April 2011

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies/organizations into NCMS:

    Anglicotech LLC (anglicotech.com) System Integration and IT Consulting

    Microsoft Corporation (www.microsoft.com)

    Microsoft's mission and values are to help people and businesses throughout the world realize their full potential.

    Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) – Federal Aerospace and Defense Division ( www.ptc.com)

    Lifecycle management software and consulting services.

    TotalSim LLC (www.totalsim.us) Computational Fluid Dynamics Consulting


    Thanks for your participation in the 2011 CTMA Symposium

    Plenary speakers put forth their needs and requirements, and the deputy commanders panel spelled out technology needs and deployment practices.  We would like to thank RW Appleton and Co, Inc., and Technical Objectives Professionals, LLC (TOP Inc.) for their sponsorship of the tour of the Marine Corps Museum, which is well worth your time.  The 2012 CTMA Symposium is tentatively scheduled for March 26-29 at the Fleet Readiness Center Southwest near San Diego.


    $3.4 million in direct service funds for the CTMA program so far in 1Q CY11:

    1. Product Data Management, Technical Information Architecture (Marine Corps System Command)

    The PM-LAV Product Data Management TIA is envisioned to harbor all technical data supporting products generated by PM-LAV activity.  The TIA will capture and automate the process flows of the current data supply exchange and simplify the effort of sharing data.  The TIA will enable collaborative workflows and access to necessary users of generated data.  The TIA will support links, systems interfaces, or assimilation of legacy data in a manner that will allow all users to obtain information and make quicker more informed decisions.

    1. Expeditionary Logistics (Marine Corps System Command)

    Data, a very tactical component with little use by itself, has become a strategic asset with aggregation and visibility.  In a world where decision cycles have grown shorter, having the right information at the right place at the right time can mean the difference between victory and failure.  Data exploitation is a key enabler of mission success no matter what the operational application.   This project will focus on the practical application of technology to increase supply chain and maintenance functions in an expeditionary environment through data exploitation.  In many cases, data is stored in disparate systems or data stores with little enterprise visibility.  Systems may be operating autonomously.  In other cases, additional technology insertions or interfaces between systems can greatly enhance business processes as well as increase the access to data.  Finally, all data is not equal.  Defining the right data needed to make actionable decisions is just as important.

    The goals of this project are:

    •   Increase deployed asset visibility
    • Identify short term technology injectors to improve the capacity of the current Supply Chain and Maintenance readiness in Afghanistan and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF
    • Introduce technology to reduce the number of convoys needed to meet capacity in Afghanistan
    • Identify short term technology injectors to improve the capacity of the current Supply Chain and Maintenance readiness while aboard Naval Shipping
    • Identify ways to decrease USMC Equipment Restructuring and Reset Costs
    1. Automated Process and Inspection Guide and Depot Data Capture (Red River Army Depot)

    While the maintenance process has dramatically changed over the years, the inspection process has changed little.  It is still mostly a manual, paper-based process where personnel examine a product either manually or with some type of device to determine if a defect is identified and log the findings on paper.  The process is highly subjective and relies extensively on the knowledge/experience of the person performing the inspection.

    In many organizations inspections are viewed as a necessary event to maintain the quality of the product.  The data is used to correct any defects.  As products age or problems arise, efforts are made to analyze the historical data to identify root cause trends and/or patterns.  Because the data is non-standard extensive effort is required to mine the data to extract it in a meaningful format.  Due to the vast array of abbreviations, slang, and short hand methods used to log the inspection results, much of the data cannot be used and requires extensive subject matter expertise on the specific item to perform even the simplest analysis.

    This project addresses these issues by developing processes to standardize both the inspection processes and inspection data.  The purpose of this project is for Aspire Solutions, Inc. (ASI) to implement a services contract at RRAD.  This project will focus on data collection, data mining and data analysis processes.  The project will include a full inspection for a vehicle.  The proposed vehicle is the FMTV truck.  This includes inspection checklist, data validation, reference data (TM, Shop instructions, etc.), training, and analysis/reporting.

    1. Enhanced Wiring Integrity System (Marine Corps Maintenance Center, Barstow)

    The Barstow production line expends extensive time troubleshooting and repairing electrical wiring systems as vehicle wiring configurations have been modified or altered in the field to meet the needs of the warfighter. An automated troubleshooting tool is needed to improve process cycle time and reliability to support the Reset Program objectives.  This effort will define the basic requirements for the development of Test Program Sets (TPSs) for use at MCB Barstow applicable to the EWIS II GFE. The Unit Under Test (UUT) for this effort is in reference to a GFE vehicle or vehicle electrical system under test. Contractor will provide the deliverables and support services that will be used to generate / validate and document electrical systems integrity concepts, test equipments, protocols and test programs.

    1. Erosion Corrosion Coatings (DoD Environmental Security Technology Certification Program)

    This project will conduct High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) tests on T56 compressor rotor blades and vanes coated with the MDS Coating Technologies (MCT) Corporation Next Generation Coating (NGC) v4.  Tests are to be conducted by the Rolls Royce Corporation (RRC) at their Indianapolis, IN test facility.  Either 15 (coated blades only) or 30 (uncoated + coated blades) compressor blades each for the 1st, 6th, 9th and 14th stage will be used for testing.  At least two (2) coated fixed vane segments will be used for testing.


    2011 Michigan Robotics Day

    On April 12, Michigan Robotics Day was held at NCMS headquarters in Ann Arbor, Michigan to coincide with National Robotics Week. NCMS partnered with The Michigan Defense Center (MEDC) and Soar Technologies for this event to celebrate robotics in the state of Michigan. Industry leaders addressed a capacity crowd while the corridors and rear parking lot of NCMS was overrun by robots and enthusiastic students.

    NCMS President & CEO Rick Jarman shared his vision of Michigan companies using collaboration to be a global leader in the design and manufacturing of advanced robotic technologies. Congressman John Dingell (D-MI), who was detained in Washington to due to the budget crisis, welcomed attendees via video and expressed his enthusiasm for the event. Keynote speaker Jim Overholt, Senior Research Scientist of Robotics for the U.S. Army, gave an entertaining and enlightening talk on the state of robotics technology.

    Photos and Webcast


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011
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    2011 CTMA Symposium Photos

    The 2011 Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) Symposium was held April 4-6 in Quantico, Virginia.

    The Symposium presented DoD Maintenance and Repair Needs requiring new technology solutions and commercial technologies that could benefit the DoD maintenance community.

    At the plenary sessions technical briefs were presented from the higher levels within the DoD to outline the overall needs within each of the Services and from those a bit closer to actual maintenance operations about how they are trying to improve their particular facilities

    [nggallery id=43]

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    The CTMA Connector March 2011

    March 2011

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies/organizations into NCMS:

    Climax Portable Machine Tools, Inc. (www.cpmt.com) Manufacturer of Portable Metal Cutting Machine Tools used in the repair and manufacturing of industrial machinery and equipment. Providing both standard and custom built tools.Optomec, Inc. (www.optomec.com) Supplier of advanced manufacturing equipment for the Electronics, Photovoltaic Display and Defense industries using clean technologies to fabricate and repair next generation end-products with improved functionality at lower cost.

    Intel Corporation (www.intel.com) Intel, the world leader in silicon innovation, develops technologies, products, and initiatives to continually advance how people work and live. Founded in 1968 to build semiconductor memory products, Intel introduced the world's first microprocessor in 1971.


    Why should you come to

    the 2011 CTMA Symposium

    April 4-6

    Quantico, VA

    1) Project Opportunities - the funding model for the CTMA program has evolved from congressionally-directed funds to service-directed funds.  Since January 2010, the CTMA program has received over $17 million in funding for projects, which is far above the $6 million annual average we received from 1998-2009.  We are on-track for receiving substantially more project funding in this calendar year as well.

    2) Our focus on technology development and deployment - CTMA projects span DoD technology readiness levels 5-8, with a strong focus on delivering capability to the DoD.  Therefore, project teams are in better positions to continue to deploy their technologies to other DoD facilities when the project has been completed.

    3) Reach into DoD - The CTMA program has well established relationships with all the DoD depots, and have expanded relationships into the intermediate repair facilities in all the services as well.  Now we are making inroads in establishing new relationships with Program Executive Officers, weapon system programs managers and chief engineers who establish DoD needs and drive technology development and deployment.

    Coming to the Symposium will expose you and your technology developments to a wide variety of DoD personnel.  If you can fill a DoD need, the CTMA program offers an opportunity to meet those needs.  The CTMA cooperative agreement offers a convenient contracting mechanism to DoD organizations to quickly apply funds to new project efforts, and to bring collaborative teams together to solve their highest priority issues.

    It is not too late to register, and to reserve a tabletop display to further educate Symposium participants about your technology solutions.  The agenda and registration can be found at http://www.ncms.org/2011CTMA/agenda.htm.


    Project Approval: Corrosion Resistant Solid State Thin-Walled Component Joining for Maintenance and Repair Applications – Phase II

    Phase I of this project created a design for a bolt-on replacement to the current belt up structure of the HMMWV. The purpose of the replacement cage is to provide a nonintrusive low weight structure that produces a pallet for a low weight composite and reduced weight metallic armor solutions while including main components of the armor into the structure, resulting in a stiffer overall end result. Emphasis was placed on hydroforming and Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) welding to produce a final design that, while meeting the crucial criteria in advancing the current structural and weight characteristics, is also feasible as a cost effective solution at the production level. Phase II will validate the DRW technology as both a tool for the direct manufacture of next generation military vehicle with specific reference to space frame structure development. The initiative of this phase of the DRW design study will follow close collaboration and coordination between the industrial team and the Program Manager Tactical Vehicles – US Army to identify weight savings opportunities on the HMMWV that also hold applicability for currently fielded vehicles (RESET/RECAP) and future vehicle programs such as JLTV and GCV.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011
    Read More

    The CTMA Connector February 2011

    February 2011Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    Featured at the 2011 CTMA Symposium:

    Major General James A. Kessler

     Commanding General

    Marine Corps Logistics Command  

    April 4-6

    Quantico, VA

    The CTMA Symposium:

    1. Creates networking opportunities among the DOD facilities, and among industry and DoD.
    2. Provides transparency of various maintenance facility needs, which then permits other attendees to provide input and/or join forces.
    3. Provides a fertile hunting ground for other potential collaborations for technology development and implementation.

    The Symposium will focus on the rapid response to the needs of the warfighter and will include DoD experts on warfighter needs, depot deputy commanders outlining their current needs, and project showcases/presentations.  The working agenda and registration can be found at http://www.ncms.org/2011CTMA/agenda.htm.


    Recently Completed Project: Item Unique Identifier Markings for Legacy Parts

    DoD Participants:  Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center (OC-ALC); U.S. Air Force Materiel Command  

    The Department of Defense (DoD) in 2003 mandated that all parts meeting specified criteria receive Item Unique Identifier (IUID) marks. The mandate can be relatively easily implemented for new acquisitions, but the non-recurring engineering (NRE) cost for updating the technical data for hundreds of thousands of legacy National Item Identification Numbers (NIINs) and physically marking millions of legacy parts in inventory is a daunting task that has delayed implementation for legacy NIINs. To address at least a significant portion of the total legacy part issue, an automated IUID Engineering Change Order (ECO) process was successfully developed under this CTMA IUID project.

    The system has been validated using actual parts and their related TDP and TO data from the Oklahoma Air Logistics Center (OC-ALC). Preliminary results show that this system can immediately provide substantial cost savings to all defense services in their non-recurring cost in creating ECOs for legacy parts that require IUID markings.

    The following benefits are being realized:

    ·   Helped establish a fixed cost (15:1 cost reduction from current $3,000 rate) and 80% cycle time reduction per ECO creation for an IUID marking for legacy parts.

    ·   Improved quality and reduction in human errors of marking identification on the drawings.

    ·   Established a cost-effective process for IUID part-marking and ECO creation, so others across DoD can adopt it.

    ·   In the short term, has potential to substantially impact the non-recurring cost- and time-savings for all of the defense services for IUID markings for legacy parts.

    ·   A financial benefit analysis indicated a maximum potential cost savings of over $700M if project technology is deployed to all branches of service as quickly as possible.

    ·   The estimated return on investment of broad deployment is about 25:1.

    The NCMS Program Manager is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, 734-995-4930.


    New NCMS Website debuts:

    Check out the new NCMS website at http://www.ncms.org.  It is designed to more easily access information that would be helpful to you. We would also welcome your feedback so that we can continuously improve the site.  Let me know your critiques, positive and constructive by contacting chuckr@ncms.org.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011
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    2011 CTMA Symposium

    Click here for Symposium attendee list (.pdf)

    CTMA Symposium

    This 2011 Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) Symposium is an annual meeting with about 200 attendees associated with maintenance and repair in the Department of Defense (DoD). Attendees are an equal mix from commercial industry and the depot/repair community.

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector January 2011

    January 2011

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies/organizations into NCMS:

    University of Louisville (www.louisville.edu) The University of Louisville is a state supported research university located in Kentucky’s largest metropolitan area.Portal Dynamics Inc. (www.portal-dynamics.com) Portal Dynamics integrated solutions represent an extensive understanding into how information and telecommunication technologies can improve the way your work is conducted. Among these are web-based applications involved in inventory life cycle management, the tracking of physical assets, and facilitated workflows.The Pacific Center for Advanced Technology Training (PCATT) at Honolulu Community College (www.pcatt.net) PCATT provides leadership and training in advanced technologies to enhance economic and workforce development programs and initiatives in the State of Hawaii and the Pacific Rim.Universal Synaptics Corporation (www.universalsynaptics.com) Since 1996, Universal Synaptics Corporation, based in Ogden, UT., has been an industry leader in detecting and isolating elusive intermittent faults, and spent years in the "trenches" researching and solving complex diagnostic and testing problems. Their research into the primary root causes of intermittent / No Fault Found (NFF) problems and the massive digital testing void that exists today with conventional scanning test equipment, led to the development of the patented Intermittent Fault Detector (IFD), hardware neural network and all-lines-all-the-time wiring / circuit analyzer test solutions.


    Enjoy a chance to get perspectives from Deputy Depot Commanders

    at this years 2011 CTMA Symposium

    April 4-6

    Quantico, VA

    The CTMA Symposium:

    1. Creates networking opportunities among the DOD facilities, and among industry and DoD.
    2. Provides transparency of various maintenance facility needs, which then permits other attendees to provide input and/or join forces.
    3. Provides a fertile hunting ground for other potential collaborations for technology development and implementation.

    The Symposium will focus on the rapid response to the needs of the warfighter and will include DoD experts on warfighter needs, depot deputy commanders outlining their current needs, and project showcases/presentations.  The working agenda and registration can be found at http://www.ncms.org/2011CTMA/agenda.htm.


    Recently Completed Project: Automated Intensifier Measurement System (AIMS-II)

    DoD Participants:  U.S. Army – CECOM; U.S. Army – Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD); U.S. Navy – NSWC Crane; U.S. Army – RDECOM CERDEC, Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate

    There are approximately 900,000 image intensifier tubes in the field. Roughly 10,000 of these image intensifier tubes are returned annually from the field and are demilitarized (destroyed) due to a lack of retesting verification. However, image intensifier tubes identified for demilitarization in the field have successfully passed MIL-Specs in Automated Intensifier Measurement System (AIMS-II) re-evaluations at continental U.S. (CONUS) depots. Returning reevaluated and fully functional tubes to the warfighters via AIMS-II can save $15-22.5M annually and can reduce the nearly two-year new tube procurement backlog; thus providing our warfighters with the night vision devices required to support their mission readiness.

    AIMS-II is a NIST-traceable, calibratable, machine vision system developed to produce rapid, automated, quantifiable, and reproducible results on all 21 of the primary image intensifier tube inspections. The image intensifier tubes are the main optical component in night vision devices. AIMS-II is a self-contained, temperature controlled, test set capable of calibration and operation in normal light levels and has a footprint of 4½’ x 6’ x 6’ (h x w x d). AIMS-II represents:

    • Increase in test performance and capabilities
    • Reduction in test time and operator labor
    • Reduction in space and darkroom requirements.

    The AIMS-II system has been delivered to Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD), which is now testing Army image intensifier tubes (MX-10130) that have been returned from the field and potentially eliminate unnecessary demilitarization of image intensifier tubes.

    This CTMA project included development efforts by The Pennsylvania State University through its Electro-Optics Center (Penn State EOC), which enabled the upgrade of this unit to accommodate the MX-10130 tube type and led to the accelerated upgrade of an existing prototype-to-production AIMS-II test set to support the Army’s (TYAD) tube testing mission.

    Customers and/or end users will be U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps depots, image intensifier tube manufacturers ITT Technologies and L-3 (Northrop Grumman Electro Optical Systems), as well as other entities that utilize image intensifier tubes in their products.

    The NCMS Program Manager is Doyle Maleche, doylem@ncms.org, 360-782-1370.


    Equipment Available:

    A completed CTMA program has surplus equipment available to DoD facilities or NCMS members.

    • A Model 283 Potentiostat/Galvanostat, and a Model 5210 Lock-In Amplifier. They are supported by new Windows 7 software. They have <50 hours total usage on them.
    • A complete corrosion and AC Impedance System for studying capacitance, polarization resistance, Tafel Plots, Cyclic Voltammetry, etc.  This is a complete benchtop corrosion R & D system.
    • two Philips X-Ray Diffraction Systems, one that is in working condition and one for parts.

    If you are interested in more information, please contact Chuck Ryan at chuckr@ncms.org.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2011
    Read More

    Dual Awards for NCMS

    Innovative Processes Improve Warfighter Readiness and Save the DoD Millions Annually in Sustainment Costs

    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) today announced that two of its projects have been honored with Defense Manufacturing Excellence Awards presented by the National Center for Advanced Technologies (NCAT) for outstanding cooperative efforts on technology development between government, industry and academia. These two achievements mark the eighth and ninth of these prestigious awards for NCMS projects.

    Both NCMS projects were formed under the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program, a unique NCMS collaboration with the Department of Defense. NCMS uses its proven and tested collaborative process powered by the innovation and manufacturing expertise of member companies to speed technology development and reduce DoD costs associated with the maintenance and rebuild of weapons systems.

    “By partnering with the NCMS, the DoD is able to quickly assess the benefits of new manufacturing technologies in their own facilities, working side-by-side with industry leaders solving manufacturing problems through collaboration,” said NCMS Vice President Chuck Ryan.

    Winner Collaborative Team Small Business Category- Modernization of Metal Electroplating with No-Mask Conforming Anodes

    NCMS managed this innovative R&D project working with Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD), Naval Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) Southwest, Advanced Tooling Corporation (ATC), and CAI Resources to reduce the cost and environmental impact of the electroplating process.

    The project team created a completely unique approach to a technological process that had otherwise gone largely unchanged for nearly a century. The project’s No-Mask Conforming Anodes resulted in amazing reductions in process time and $990,000 in immediate savings from the two most recent pilots. The process all but eliminates toxic hazardous waste resulting from masking materials found in previous methods. Reusable, sustainable, and highly efficient, No-Mask Conforming Anodes promises to revolutionize the world of electroplating.

    The team estimates that if this technology were deployed across the DoD, a savings of over $50,000,000 could result over the next three years alone, with an overall process time improvement of 35-50%, all translating into improved readiness for the warfighter and reliability of platforms. Limited deployment has already generated an additional $7,280,000 in savings.

    Winner Collaborative Team Large Business Category- Automated Robotic Blade Stripping System (ARBSS)

    NCMS brought together the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) - Keyport, Naval Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) East, Penn State Applied Research Laboratory, General Lasertronics Corporation, Sikorsky Aircraft Company, and Michigan based Koops, Inc. to create an innovative solution for the refurbishment of helicopter blades.

    FRC East refurbishes up to 150 helicopter rotor blades each month. Prior to ARBSS, technicians removed the topcoat of paint using pneumatic hand orbital sanders. This slow, error-prone process demands hours of tedious labor in a sweltering, hazardous environment while wearing protection equipment to avoid toxic dust inhalation. Stress injuries, fatigue, and lost time are significant problems.

    Determined to improve this process with advanced laser and vision systems, the NCMS-managed ARBSS team developed a proven automated robotic laser paint stripping technology that strips helicopter blades 75% faster than traditional methods, with practically zero error. The precision required stripping only the paint of a blade while leaving the primer coat intact thereby eliminating damage or wear to the substrate. This process is expected to save $900,000 annually, eliminates the generation of secondary hazardous waste, and provides an unprecedented level of safety and comfort for the maintainers.

    For more information on other NCMS’ collaborations and past award winning projects, please visit www.ncms.org.

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector December 2010

    December 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies/organizations into NCMS:

    InTheWorks, Inc. (www.intheworks.com)

    InTheWorks, Inc. (ITW) is a clean tech start-up company focusing on developing and licensing technology that will set standards in marine emissions reduction. The premiere offering is a patent-pending catalytic converter that has achieved groundbreaking results for gasoline marine engines, eliminating most of the harmful emissions and with added benefits to enhance the boating experience. The technology was developed on high performance engines and is unrivalled by any currently available exhaust systems.

    Edison Welding Institute (EWI) (www.ewi.org)

    Since the early 1980s, EWI has helped manufacturers in the aerospace, automotive, defense, energy and chemical, government, heavy manufacturing, and electronics industries improve their productivity, time to market, and profitability through innovative materials joining and allied technologies.

    Picometrix, LLC  (www.picometrix.com)

    High speed optoelectronics, high speed optical receivers and terahertz inspection and metrology systems.

    Battelle (www.battelle.org)

    Battelle is the world’s largest, independent research and development organization, working to advance scientific discovery and application.

    Eastern Michigan University (www.emich.edu)

    Constitutionally incorporated Michigan institution of higher education providing an array of academic programs to more than 23,000 graduate and undergraduate students.


    Registration now open: 2011 CTMA Symposium

    April 4-6

    Quantico, VA

    The Symposium will focus on the rapid response to the needs of the warfighter and will include DoD experts on warfighter needs, depot commanders outlining their current needs, project showcases/presentations, as well as highlighting other DoD-sponsored programs.  The working agenda can be found at http://www.ncms.org/2011CTMA/agenda.htm.


    Two CTMA projects win awards at the Defense Manufacturing Conference

    Winner Collaborative Team Small Business Category-

    Modernization of Metal Electroplating with No-Mask Conforming Anodes

    NCMS managed this innovative R&D project working with Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD), Naval Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) Southwest, Advanced Tooling Corporation (ATC), and CAI Resources to reduce the cost and environmental impact of the electroplating process.

    The project team created a completely unique approach to a technological process that had otherwise gone largely unchanged for nearly a century. The project’s No Mask Conforming Anodes resulted in amazing reductions in process time and $990,000 in immediate savings from the two most recent pilots.  The process also all but eliminates toxic hazardous waste resulting from masking materials common in previous methods. Reusable, sustainable, and highly efficient, No Mask Conforming Anodes promise to revolutionize the world of electroplating.

    The team estimates that if this technology were deployed across the Department of Defense (DOD), a savings of over $50,000,000 could result over the next three years alone, with an overall process time improvement of 35-50%, all translating into improved readiness for the warfighter and reliability of platforms.  Limited deployment has already generated an additional $7,280,000 in savings.

    Please visit http://www.ncms.org/NoMaskShowcase/Player.html to view two videos on this exciting new innovation

    Winner Collaborative Team Large Business Category-

    Automated Robotic Blade Stripping System (ARBSS)

    NCMS brought together the Keyport Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC), Naval Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) East, Penn State Applied Research Laboratory, General Lasertronics Corporation, Sikorsky Aircraft Company, and Michigan based Koops, Inc. to create an innovative solution for the refurbishment of helicopter blades.

    FRC East refurbishes up to 150 helicopter rotor blades each month. First, workers must remove the topcoat of paint using air-driven orbital sanders. The slow, error-prone process demands hours of tedious labor in a sweltering, hazardous environment. Personnel must wear protection equipment to avoid toxic dust inhalation. Stress injuries, fatigue, and lost time are significant problems. Hand sanding the paint off a blade is a skillfull art, but can still result in many damaged blades.

    Determined to improve this process with advanced laser and vision systems, the  ARBSS team developed a proven automated robotic laser paint stripping technology that strips helicopter blades 75% faster than traditional methods, with practically zero error. This process is expected to save $900,000 annually, eliminates the generation of secondary hazardous waste, and provides an unprecedented level of safety and comfort for the maintainers.

    These two winning projects brings the total number of DMC awards to 9 for the CTMA program.  Congratulations to each of the teams.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010
    Read More

    2010 NCAT DME Award Winner

    Modernization of Metal Electroplating with No-Mask Conforming Anodes

    Winner Collaborative Team Small Business Category
    While people may not pause to consider electroplating, the fact is, today’s world would be impossible without it. Cadmium, Zinc, Gold, Silver, Platinum, Titanium, Chrome; those and many more are integral to our daily lives.  Despite a role in every aspect of modern society, the process and technology for metal electroplating has gone largely unchanged for the past 100 years. While safety and environmental hazards have been slightly reduced, electroplating remains a toxic, wasteful, inefficient, time consuming process.

    The basic electroplating process consists of taking a base part and carefully mask off any areas needing protection from the plating process, using tape and wax. Then insert it into a metal-containing solution, apply electricity around a metallic anode, and wait.   Hours or days later the part is plated.

    Time consuming (masking takes hours and requires the best platers in a shop), inefficient (as much as 90% of the electrical power used to plate is wasted), dangerous (plating baths can be incredibly toxic, as is used maskant). There simply has to be a better way.

    Working in tandem with CCAD and FRC West engineers, ATC, and CAI Resources, NCMS managed an innovative R&D project that sought to address the cost and environmental issues with a single, powerful solution. The project’s outcome is a completely unique approach. Called No Mask Conforming Anodes, it eliminates the masking step altogether. Each is custom-made to the part it will plate, acid-proof PVC masking is incorporated into the anode itself, which is configured to the specific part shape. This increases speed and uniformity of the metal deposit. Areas not to be plated remain protected and do not electrically communicate with the plating bath. Parts can even be plated outside a tank, with plating fluid pumped through at high speed to realize an optimal metal coat with almost no danger of hydrogen embrittlement, and reduced energy and toxic chemical usage through the elimination of typical in-tank processing facility.

    During this three-phase project, the team designed and implemented several no-mask anodes for hard chromium and nickel plated parts. The particular parts were selected based on their volume, long plating cycles, labor-intensive masking and machining, and relatively high reject/rework rates.  Additionally, one part, the CH-47 Chinook Rotor Blade Tip, was selected because no repair process existed at all, so damaged parts were discarded and replaced at a cost of $258,000 annually.
    By the end of the project, the new tooling developed during the course of the work had been incorporated into the each of the facility’s electroplating operations, with new tooling also provided to Warner Robbins, Aniston, and Cherry Point.

    Pilots for these no-mask anodes were conducted at CCAD and FRC Southwest, and the results were nothing short of astonishing:

    • 95% reduction in pre-plating part preparation
    • 45% reduction in plating time
    • 78% reduction in scrap or reject parts
    • 50% increase in plating tank capacity, improving overall throughput
    • $990,000 in immediate savings from the two most recent pilot parts tested alone

    As impressive as these achievements are, one final item must not be forgotten: the technology completely eliminates the mountains of used maskant, which had to be disposed of as hazardous waste so toxic that even brief exposure could lead to serious injury or environmental catastrophe. The overall reduction in hazardous waste at the Depots is enormous.

    The team estimates that if No-Mask Conforming Anodes were deployed across the DoD, a savings of over $50,000,000 could result over the next three years alone, with an overall process time improvement of 35-50%, all translating into improved readiness for the warfighter.  As a direct result of this CTMA project, Anniston, Cherry Point, Warner Robins and FRC East have been provided production-ready tooling which has generated an additional $7,280,000 savings to date.

    Read More

    2010 CTMA Symposium

    Agenda

    Monday, 22 March Pre-Symposium Networking Activities 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. – Golf Scramble, Medal of Honor Golf Course 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. – Early Registration – The Clubs at Quantico Lobby 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. – Opening Evening ReceptionTuesday, 23 March7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast

    8:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks – Richard B. Jarman,               President & CEO, NCMS 8:10 a.m. Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) Overview,               Greg Kilchenstein, Office of Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of               Defense, (Maintenance Policy & Programs) 8:30 a.m. Major General Nickolas G. Justice, U.S. Army Research and Engineering               Command, (RDECOM) 9:15 a.m. BREAK 9:30 a.m.  Mr. Gary Motsek, Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense                (Maintenance Policy & Programs) Acting 10:00 a.m. Mrs. Debra Tune (SES), Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for                 Logistics, Office of the Secretary of the Air Force

    10:30 a.m. BREAK 10:45 a.m. Mr. Michael Madden (SES), Executive Deputy, Marine Corps                 Logistics Command 11:15 a.m. Rear Admiral Thomas Moore, Deputy Director for Fleet Readiness, Chief                of Naval Operations 11:45 a.m. LUNCH                Lunch Speaker – Voice from the Field and the Reality of Maintenance in                Theater, Todd Eggler, International Man of Maintenance

    Project Showcases 1:00 p.m. Strategic Perspectives on Depot Maintenance Technology Insertion

    Senior DoD logisticians will provide strategic perspectives on depot maintenance technology insertion (TI). Panel members will discuss the recent effort by the Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Maintenance) and the Services to embark on a requirements-driven approach for identifying and funding TI solutions to depot maintenance problems. They will provide the view from the top as they answer questions related to the Service-specific impact of a requirements-driven approach to TI while emphasizing the need for joint collaboration through the process. Audience participation is encouraged.

    Moderator – RDML (Ret.) Steve Heilman, LMI

    Panel Members:

    RDML Thomas Moore, Deputy Director for Fleet Readiness, Chief of Naval Operations Ms. Sharon Smoot (SES), Acting Executive Director for Logistics, Maintenance and Industrial Operations, Naval Sea Systems Command Mr. Michael Madden (SES), Executive Deputy, Marine Corps Logistics Command Mrs. Debra Tune (SES), Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Logistics, Office of the Secretary of the Air Force

    3:15 p.m. BREAK 3:30 p.m. Fuel Leak Technology, Michael Evans, Executive Vice President, Aerowing 4:00 p.m. Laser Stripping Technology, John Incata, System Operator, FRC East;               Lee Nathan, Mechanical Engineer, Naval Undersea Warfare               Center – Keyport

    4:30 p.m. Adjourn5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Evening Tabletop Reception – The Clubs at QuanticoWednesday, 24 March7:00 - 8:00 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast

    8:00 a.m. Requirements and Solution-Based Technology Insertion – A Balanced                Investment Portfolio Approach, Thomas T. Gorman, JG-DM, Secretariat

    8:45 a.m. Insertion Requirements; Moderator – RDML (Ret.) Steve Heilman,               LMI, What IS and What IS NOT a Requirement? (This workshop will               identify what the process is for generating and budgeting for a               Requirement.) 10:15 a.m. BREAKProject Tracks(Track Sessions will be held concurrently)

    Coatings/Corrosion Control 10:30 a.m. Laser Cleaning & Surface Prep for Sustainment Repairs,                Tim Niemeier, Vice President, Adapt Laser Systems 10:50 a.m. Practical Cold Spray, Wally Birtch, Senior Application & Development                Engineer, Centerline (Windsor) Ltd; Matt Trexler,                Army Research Laboratory 11:10 a.m. Laser Additive Manufacturing as Repair for Titanium Compressor Blades,                 Dr. Shawn Kelly, Research Associate, iMAST, Applied Research                Laboratory, Penn State University 11:30 a.m. Repair of Submarine Shafts Using Laser Cladding, Dr. Todd Palmer,                 Research Associate, iMAST, Applied Research Laboratory,                 Penn State UniversityInspection/Test 10:30 a.m. Automated Process & Inspection Guide (AP&IG), Randy Kirk,                 President & CEO, Aspire Solutions, Inc. 10:50 a.m. CH-53 Readiness & Reliability II, Steve Husak, Business Development,                 REI Systems Inc. 11:10 a.m. Enhanced Wiring Integrity Systems (EWIS) II, Olga Keegan, FRC                Southwest, Commodore Wing (SH-60); Shawn Lamper, Program                Manager, Eclypse International 11:30 a.m. Night Vision Devices (AIMS), Rick Foley, Chief, New Technology R&D                 Division, Tobyhanna Army DepotEnvironmental 10:30 a.m. Erosion/Corrosion Resistance Coatings ESTCP Project, Jon Cheverie,                 Projects, Business Development, MDS-PRAD Technologies Corporation 10:50 a.m. In-Situ Coating Analysis for Hazardous Metals, Mitchell Vickers,                Engineering Technician, Norfolk Naval Shipyard 11:10 a.m. Fast Field Fluid Assessment Support Tools (3 FAST), Mitch Shikowitz,                Business Development Manager, QinetiQ-NA, Spectro, Inc; Edgardo                Guevara, Lubricant Program Manager, Military Sealift Command 11:30 a.m. Improved Stealth and Lower Cost Operations for U.S. Naval Ships Using                High-Performance Cordage Deck Edge Netting, Dr. John Puglia, Director                of Human and Systems Technology, QinetiQ North AmericaWorkload/Workforce/Material Management 10:30 a.m. Legacy Lifecycle Data Management, Nainesh Rathod, President & CEO,                Imaginestics 10:50 a.m. Sense & Respond – LAV III, John McGinnis, Vice President, Solidica, Inc.;                 Bill Black, President, Black & Rossi, LLC 11:10 a.m. Centralized Fleet Automated Management System (CFAMS),                Peter Fausel, Executive Vice President Sales & Marketing,                I.D. Systems, Inc.                 11:30 a.m. Item Unique Identifier (IUID) Markings for Legacy Parts, Nainesh Rathod,                President & CEO, Imaginestics

    1200 LUNCH Metal Working 1:20 p.m. Trivalent Chrome Plating II, Tim Hall, Principal Scientist, Faraday               Technologies; Bruce Griffin, Associate Technical Fellow,               Boeing Corporation 1:40 p.m. Advanced Tooling for Nickel Plating, George Cushnie, Vice President,               Advanced Tooling Corporation 2:00 p.m. Metal Finishing Development, Lindsay Hampton, Chemist, Corpus Christi                Army Depot; George Cushnie, Vice President, Advanced               Tooling Corporation  2:20 p.m. Optical Generation of 3D Models for Computer-Aided Manufacturing               (OptiCAM) IV, Ali Farsaie, President, Spatial Integrated Systems, Inc.Inspection/Test (continued) 1:20 p.m. Common Automatic Test Equipment (ATE), Richard Freeman, Business                Development, Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training & Support; Hugh                Pritchett, President, Analysis, Integration & Design, Inc.Manufacturing 1:40 p.m. Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools, Ron Hicks, Director,               API Technical Services, Automated Precision, Inc. 2:00 p.m. Rapid Access to Readiness Essential (RARE) Parts through               Rapid Manufacturing & Repair Technologies, Christopher Robinson,               Non-Metallics Manufacturing Lead and Autonomous Vehicles               Engineering Lead, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division,               China Lake; Rex Brown, LLC Mechanical Principal Engineer,               Honeywell FM&T; Greg Morris, CEO/COO, Morris Technologies, Inc. 2:20 p.m. General Emulation of Microcircuits (GEM) – Overcoming the Microcircuit                Obsolescence Issue, Fred Shope, Research Analyst, DLA DSCC               GEM Program OfficeComposites 1:20 p.m. Heat Transfer Classification for Production Tooling & Composite Repair,               Tom Rose, President, AvPro, Inc. 1:40 p.m. Inspection & Repair Preparation Cell (IRPC), Frank Elliott, Advanced               Initiatives Coordinator, GFM GmbH 2:00 p.m. Use of Microwires for Internal Bondline or Thick Laminate Temperature                Measurements, Tom Rose, President, AvPro, Inc. 2:20 p.m. Introduction to Digitizing and Shearography Technology, K.R. Srinivas,               Director of North American Operations, Steinbichler Vision SystemsWorkload/Workforce/Material Management (continued) 1:20 p.m. Smart Machines II, P.J. Sturdevant, Freedom Product Manager,               MAG Industries 1:40 p.m. Stop Training; Start Learning, Dr. Hossein Nivi, President & CEO,               Pendaran, Inc. 2:00 p.m. Making Sense of CBM Data Using Advanced Analytics, Joanne Zuzelski,                Director of Partner Relations, Enterprise Computing & Analytics,               Altair Engineering

    2:20 p.m. “Lose the weight!” Automated Welding of Tubular Metals Using                Deformation Resistance Welding, Jim Richter, Director, Gravikor, Inc.

    2:40 p.m. BREAK

    3:00 p.m. Requirements-Driven Depot Maintenance Technology Insertion:               Practical Perspectives

    Members of the JTEG will provide practical perspectives on requirements-based depot maintenance technology insertion (TI). Representing their Service’s logistics headquarters, this panel of subject matter experts provides the link to the shop floor by continuously working to facilitate the introduction of new and emerging technologies, processes, and equipment into the depot maintenance community. They will answer questions that focus on the benefits of Joint Service collaboration and the importance of moving the maintenance community toward a unified, requirements-driven TI approach. Audience participation is encouraged. Moderator – Steve Siens, JDMAG/JTEG Panel Members:

    Greg Kilchenstein, OADUSD (MP&P)

    Tom Spitler, Air Force Materiel Command

    Kurt Doehnert, Naval Sea Systems Command

    Greg Russell, Marine Corps Logistics Bases

    Gerry Bates, Army Materiel Command

    4:30 p.m. Adjourn

    Special thanks to our sponsors!

    © 2010

    Click here for Symposium Attendee List

     

    Monday, 22 March

    Pre-Symposium Networking Activities

    9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. – Golf Scramble, Medal of Honor Golf Course

    5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. – Early Registration – The Clubs at Quantico Lobby

    6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. – Opening Evening Reception

     

    Tuesday, 23 March

    7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast

    8:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks – Richard B. Jarman, President & CEO, NCMS

    8:10 a.m. Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) Overview, Greg Kilchenstein, Office of Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense, (Maintenance Policy & Programs)

    8:30 a.m. Major General Nickolas G. Justice, U.S. Army Research and Engineering Command, (RDECOM)

    9:15 a.m. BREAK 9:30 a.m.  Mr. Gary Motsek, Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Maintenance Policy & Programs) Acting

    10:00 a.m. Mrs. Debra Tune (SES), Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Logistics, Office of the Secretary of the Air Force

    10:30 a.m. BREAK

    10:45 a.m. Mr. Michael Madden (SES), Executive Deputy, Marine Corps Logistics Command

    11:15 a.m. Rear Admiral Thomas Moore, Deputy Director for Fleet Readiness, Chief of Naval Operations

    11:45 a.m. LUNCH - Lunch Speaker:– Voice from the Field and the Reality of Maintenance in Theater, Todd Eggler, International Man of Maintenance

     

    Project Showcases

    1:00 p.m. Strategic Perspectives on Depot Maintenance Technology Insertion

    Senior DoD logisticians will provide strategic perspectives on depot maintenance technology insertion (TI). Panel members will discuss the recent effort by the Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Maintenance) and the Services to embark on a requirements-driven approach for identifying and funding TI solutions to depot maintenance problems. They will provide the view from the top as they answer questions related to the Service-specific impact of a requirements-driven approach to TI while emphasizing the need for joint collaboration through the process. Audience participation is encouraged.

    Moderator: – RDML (Ret.) Steve Heilman, LMI

    Panel Members:
    RDML Thomas Moore - Deputy Director for Fleet Readiness, Chief of Naval Operations Ms. Sharon Smoot (SES), Acting Executive Director for Logistics, Maintenance and Industrial Operations, Naval Sea Systems Command Mr. Michael Madden (SES), Executive Deputy, Marine Corps Logistics Command

    Mrs. Debra Tune (SES) - Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Logistics, Office of the Secretary of the Air Force

    3:15 p.m. BREAK

    3:30 p.m. Fuel Leak Technology, Doug Dynes, Pentagon SAF IEL, Michael Evans, Executive Vice President, Aerowing

    4:00 p.m. Laser Stripping Technology, John Incata, System Operator, FRC East; Lee Nathan, Mechanical Engineer, Naval Undersea Warfare Center– Keyport

    4:30 p.m. Adjourn

    5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Evening Tabletop Reception -– The Clubs at Quantico

     

    Wednesday, 24 March

    7:00 - 8:00 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast

    8:00 a.m. Requirements and Solution-Based Technology Insertion – A Balanced Investment Portfolio Approach, Thomas T. Gorman, JG-DM, Secretariat

    8:45 a.m. Insertion Requirements; Moderator – RDML (Ret.) Steve Heilman, LMI, What IS and What IS NOT a Requirement? (This workshop will identify what the process is for generating and budgeting for a Requirement.) 10:15 a.m. BREAK

     

    Project Tracks(Track Sessions will be held concurrently)

    Coatings/Corrosion Control

    10:30 a.m. Laser Cleaning & Surface Prep for Sustainment Repairs, Tim Niemeier, Vice President, Adapt Laser Systems

    10:50 a.m. Practical Cold Spray, Wally Birtch, Senior Application & Development Engineer, Centerline (Windsor) Ltd; Matt Trexler, Army Research Laboratory

    11:10 a.m. Laser Additive Manufacturing as Repair for Titanium Compressor Blades, Dr. Shawn Kelly, Research Associate, iMAST, Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University

    11:30 a.m. Repair of Submarine Shafts Using Laser Cladding, Dr. Todd Palmer, Research Associate, iMAST, Applied Research Laboratory, Penn State University

     

    Inspection/Test

    10:30 a.m. Automated Process & Inspection Guide (AP&IG), Randy Kirk, President & CEO, Aspire Solutions, Inc.

    10:50 a.m. CH-53 Readiness & Reliability II, Steve Husak, Business Development, REI Systems Inc.

    11:10 a.m. Enhanced Wiring Integrity Systems (EWIS) II, Olga Keegan, FRC Southwest, Commodore Wing (SH-60); Shawn Lamper, Program Manager, Eclypse International

    11:30 a.m. Night Vision Devices (AIMS), Rick Foley, Chief, New Technology R&D Division, Tobyhanna Army Depot

     

    Environmental

    10:30 a.m. Erosion/Corrosion Resistance Coatings ESTCP Project, Jon Cheverie, Projects, Business Development, MDS-PRAD Technologies Corporation

    10:50 a.m. In-Situ Coating Analysis for Hazardous Metals, Mitchell Vickers, Engineering Technician, Norfolk Naval Shipyard

    11:10 a.m. Fast Field Fluid Assessment Support Tools (3 FAST), Mitch Shikowitz, Business Development Manager, QinetiQ-NA, Spectro, Inc; Edgardo Guevara, Lubricant Program Manager, Military Sealift Command

    11:30 a.m. Improved Stealth and Lower Cost Operations for U.S. Naval Ships Using High-Performance Cordage Deck Edge Netting, Dr. John Puglia, Director of Human and Systems Technology, QinetiQ North America

     

    Workload/Workforce/Material Management

    10:30 a.m. Legacy Lifecycle Data Management, Nainesh Rathod, President & CEO, Imaginestics

    10:50 a.m. Sense & Respond – LAV III, John McGinnis, Vice President, Solidica, Inc.; Bill Black, President, Black & Rossi, LLC

    11:10 a.m. Centralized Fleet Automated Management System (CFAMS), Peter Fausel, Executive Vice President Sales & Marketing,  I.D. Systems, Inc.

    11:30 a.m. Item Unique Identifier (IUID) Markings for Legacy Parts, Nainesh Rathod,  President & CEO, Imaginestics

    1200 LUNCH

     

    Metal Working

    1:20 p.m. Trivalent Chrome Plating II, Tim Hall, Principal Scientist, Faraday Technologies; Bruce Griffin, Associate Technical Fellow, Boeing Corporation

    1:40 p.m. Advanced Tooling for Nickel Plating, George Cushnie, Vice President, Advanced Tooling Corporation

    2:00 p.m. Metal Finishing Development, Lindsay Hampton, Chemist, Corpus Christi Army Depot; George Cushnie, Vice President, Advanced Tooling Corporation

    2:20 p.m. Optical Generation of 3D Models for Computer-Aided Manufacturing (OptiCAM) IV, Ali Farsaie, President, Spatial Integrated Systems, Inc.

     

    Inspection/Test (continued)

    1:20 p.m. Common Automatic Test Equipment (ATE), Richard Freeman, Business Development, Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training & Support; Hugh Pritchett, President, Analysis, Integration & Design, Inc.Manufacturing

    1:40 p.m. Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools, Ron Hicks, Director, API Technical Services, Automated Precision, Inc.

    2:00 p.m. Rapid Access to Readiness Essential (RARE) Parts through Rapid Manufacturing & Repair Technologies, Christopher Robinson, Non-Metallics Manufacturing Lead and Autonomous Vehicles  Engineering Lead, Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division, China Lake; Rex Brown, LLC Mechanical Principal Engineer, Honeywell FM&T; Greg Morris, CEO/COO, Morris Technologies, Inc.

    2:20 p.m. General Emulation of Microcircuits (GEM) – Overcoming the Microcircuit Obsolescence Issue, Fred Shope, Research Analyst, DLA DSCC GEM Program Office

     

    Composites

    1:20 p.m. Heat Transfer Classification for Production Tooling & Composite Repair, Tom Rose, President, AvPro, Inc.

    1:40 p.m. Inspection & Repair Preparation Cell (IRPC), Frank Elliott, Advanced Initiatives Coordinator, GFM GmbH

    2:00 p.m. Use of Microwires for Internal Bondline or Thick Laminate Temperature Measurements, Tom Rose, President, AvPro, Inc.

    2:20 p.m. Introduction to Digitizing and Shearography Technology, K.R. Srinivas, Director of North American Operations, Steinbichler Vision Systems

     

    Workload/Workforce/Material Management (continued)

    1:20 p.m. Smart Machines II, P.J. Sturdevant, Freedom Product Manager, MAG Industries

    1:40 p.m. Stop Training; Start Learning, Dr. Hossein Nivi, President & CEO, Pendaran, Inc.

    2:00 p.m. Making Sense of CBM Data Using Advanced Analytics, Joanne Zuzelski, Director of Partner Relations, Enterprise Computing & Analytics, Altair Engineering

    2:20 p.m. “Lose the weight!” Automated Welding of Tubular Metals Using Deformation Resistance Welding, Jim Richter, Director, Gravikor, Inc.

    2:40 p.m. BREAK
    3:00 p.m. Requirements-Driven Depot Maintenance Technology Insertion: Practical Perspectives

    Members of the JTEG will provide practical perspectives on requirements-based depot maintenance technology insertion (TI). Representing their Service’s logistics headquarters, this panel of subject matter experts provides the link to the shop floor by continuously working to facilitate the introduction of new and emerging technologies, processes, and equipment into the depot maintenance community. They will answer questions that focus on the benefits of Joint Service collaboration and the importance of moving the maintenance community toward a unified, requirements-driven TI approach. Audience participation is encouraged.

    Moderator: – Steve Siens, JDMAG/JTEG

    Panel Members:
    Greg Kilchenstein - OADUSD (MP&P)
    Tom Spitler - Air Force Materiel Command
    Kurt Doehnert - Naval Sea Systems Command
    Greg Russell - Marine Corps Logistics Bases
    Gerry Bates - Army Materiel Command

    4:30 p.m. Adjourn

     


    Read More

    VALMT Wins R&D 100 Award

    NCMS recently collected its R&D 100 award for its Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools (VALMT) project, which pioneered an innovative process in volumetric error compensation for large machine tools.  NCMS has won five R&D 100 Awarda which are recognized as the "Oscars of Innovation," and honor excellence in high technology products.

    Learn More about VALMT

    Read More

    VALMT Wins R&D 100 Award

    NCMS recently collected its R&D 100 award for its Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools (VALMT) project, which pioneered an innovative process in volumetric error compensation for large machine tools.  NCMS has won five R&D 100 Awarda which are recognized as the "Oscars of Innovation," and honor excellence in high technology products.

    Learn More about VALMT

    Read More

    2010 Department of Defense Maintenance and Symposium Photos


    NCMS and its members had a major presence at this year's maintenance symposium.  NCMS also produced a video for USMC which helped them garner best booth honors.

    Read More

    Rock Island Arsenal Sponsors Aspire Solutions, Inc Open House

    The Rock Island Arsenal sponsored an open house on November 2, 2010 to highlight Aspire Solutions, Inc (ASI) data capture project sponsored by NCMS.  This project provides high quality document scanning combined with meta-data capture designed to simplify document management and make it easy to share documents across the enterprise.

    Converting paper into digital files only provides a partial solution.  Many companies stop just after scanning the document, but ASI takes it a step further and offers extremely high quality, full color digital documentation  Unlike traditional services, ASI extracts information from the document using automated metadata capturing heuristics to make locating a file easy.  The document is then transformed into a text searchable file utilizing Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology, which allows the user to search for any keyword in the entire file.  The file is then optimized in order to minimize the file size and drastically reduce storage space costs.

    Major General Kurt Stein, commander of the US Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command, attended the open house and saw many applications and benefits of the ASI data capture project both for RIA and the entire Army.  The open house was also attended by senior RIA leadership who were updated on the project’s progress and shown examples of the information being captured.

    The benefits of ASI’s document scanning and data capture process go beyond just transforming paper filing cabinets into a digital format.  The documents are instantly available throughout the system, which can reduce cycle time and improve customer service.  The table to the left highlights key features and attributes of the ASI toolset.  ASI has the capability to scan many different file times including propriety (PII) sensitive material.  It is cost effective and ensures 100% visibility and accountability of all paper documentation.

    For more information on Aspire Solutions, Inc. please contact: info@aspiresolns.com

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector November 2010

    November 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies into NCMS:

    Southwest Research Institute (www.swri.org)

    Independent, non-profit, applied research and development organization dedicated to technology development and transfer for a wide variety of engineering and scientific disciplines.


    Save the Date: 2011 CTMA Symposium

    April 4-6

    Quantico, VA

    The Symposium will focus on the rapid response to the needs of the warfighter and will include DoD experts on warfighter needs, depot commanders outlining their current needs, project showcases/presentations, as well as highlighting other DoD-sponsored programs.  An early draft agenda can be found at http://www.ncms.org/2011CTMA/agenda.htm.  Registration will begin soon.


    Funding Available for Environmental Research and Development

    The DoD Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) is seeking to fund environmental research and development in the Weapons Systems and Platforms program area.  SERDP invests across the broad spectrum of basic and applied research, as well as advanced development.  The development and application of innovative environmental technologies will reduce the costs, environmental risks, and time required to resolve environmental problems while, at the same time, enhancing and sustaining military readiness.  The Weapons Systems and Platforms program area supports the development of innovative technologies that reduce or eliminate the use of hazardous materials in its production and maintenance processes, reduce hazardous waste streams, and better understand and mitigate emissions and other environmental impacts that result from its operations. SERDP is requesting proposals that respond to the following four focused Statements of Need (SON) in Weapons Systems and Platforms:

    • Chemical Agent Resistant Powder Topcoats
    • Scale-Up and Formulation of Green Insensitive Secondary Explosives
    • Waste to Energy Converters for Overseas Contingency Operations
    • Reliability of Tin-Whisker-Mitigating Conformal Coatings

    Proposals responding to the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 SONs will be selected through a competitive process.  Pre-proposals from the non-federal sector are due by Thursday, January 6, 2011.  Proposals from the federal sector are due by Thursday, March 10, 2011. The SONs and detailed instructions for federal and private sector proposers are available on the SERDP web site at

    www.serdp-estcp.org/Funding-Opportunities/SERDP-Solicitations.


    If you are at the DoD Maintenance Symposium and Exhibition in Tampa this week, come visit us at booth #327.


    Non-CTMA project opportunities:

    NCMS is currently defining projects in the following areas:

    1. Pilot Development of an Electric Vehicle to Grid Infrastructure that includes on-site renewable energy (wind, solar, fuel cell)
      • Demonstration for fleet vehicles
    2. Advanced Modeling and Simulation of Vehicle to Grid interactions to optimize the widespread consumer usage of recharging stations.
    3. Green Manufacturing of Ammonia for use as a fuel for combustion engines
      • Including on-site manufacturing and cost reduction.
    4. Optimized Engine Design and Demonstration of Ammonia fuel in Fleet and Agricultural Vehicles
      • Development of conversion kits for vehicles and power generation equipment

    If there is an interest from corporations or military facilities, or if you want further information, contact Chuck Ryan, chuckr@ncms.org, (734)995-4905.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010

     

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    The CTMA Connector October 2010

    October 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies into NCMS:

    Curtiss-Wright Controls Electronic Systems (www.cwcembedded.com)

    Curtiss-Wright Controls Electronic Systems provides rugged, integrated solutions that are qualified for military platforms.  These solutions typically include system engineering trade studies and application support, with a combination of custom board design and third party COTS content, along with customer provided electronics.  Product and service expertise includes:  Motion Control, Network Centric Computing, Rate Sensor Assemblies, Vehicle Management Computers, High Speed Data Recording & Rugged Storage, Enclosure/Chassis, Backplanes and Electronic Manufacturing Services.

    Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Division of Technology Resources and Engineering (R&D) (www.baxter.com)

    Baxter International Inc., through its subsidiaries, develops, manufactures and markets products that save and sustain the lives of people with hemophilia, immune disorders, infectious diseases, kidney disease, trauma, and other chronic and acute medical conditions. As a global, diversified healthcare company, Baxter applies a unique combination of expertise in medical devices, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology to create products that advance patient care worldwide.

    University of Massachusetts Lowell (http://www.uml.edu)

    Educational Institution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

    The Marlin Group, LLC

    Logistics modernization consulting to DoD (primarily USMC) services & agencies.


    Save the Date: 2011 CTMA Symposium

    April 4-6

    Quantico, VA

    The Symposium will focus on rapid response to the needs of the warfighter and will include DoD experts on warfighter requirements, depot commanders outlining their current needs, project showcases/presentations, as well as highlighting other DoD-sponsored technology programs.


    Recently Approved CTMA Project: Robotic Automated Coating Removal System (RACRS)

    DoD Participants:  Navy Fleet Readiness Center East; Warner Robins Air Logistics Center; Corpus Christi Army Depot

    A new DoD program, the Sustainment Logistics Technology Program, was recently created to enable game-changing technologies to be quickly developed and deployed into the DoD maintenance facilities.  The first SLTP project builds off a recently completed CTMA project that developed and deployed an automated rotor blade stripping system (ARBSS) for CH-53 blades.  The project was conducted in gated phases that first confirmed the approach on a small scale, designed a full-scale system that was built and tested at NUWC-Keyport, and finally deployed at the Fleet Readiness Center – East (FRC-E) in late 2009.  The system is currently used in production.

    The DoD inventory contains:

    • Over 5,000 helicopters (including about 2,360 H-60s and about 240 H-53s)
      • Estimate 1,770 blades require paint stripping annually
    • About 100 V-22 tiltrotors (to grow to over 450)
      • Estimated repaintings/year:  5 first year, increasing as inventory and age increase

    Virtually all major helicopters and tiltrotors have composite main rotor blades that are also hand-sanded, or at best, impact blasted to remove the paint.  In such cases, there is an increased risk of damage to the blade because of the lack of control of the coating removal process.  In addition, hazardous waste can be greatly reduced through the use of a laser stripping system, saving an addition $100K per year.

    Currently, the removal of paint from a V-22 consumes 372 hours of labor, so that this step of the repair process only allows throughput of a single aircraft per month.  Depot workload for the V-22 is expected to increase ten-fold over the current maintenance workload.  This increase will also mean that FRC-E will need to hire over 100 new workers to handle the coating removal workload.  In addition, the current process relies upon manual sanding to remove the coatings.  Hand-sanding requires relatively skillful artisans so as to not damage the wire mesh lightning protector just underneath the outer coatings.

    Proposed Solution

    In order to increase the depot throughput of V-22 aircraft, an automated and less labor intensive system must be developed and deployed.  Using the ARBSS system as a base, the overall project will first develop and deploy enhanced ARBSS versions that will be more robust, able to achieve faster stripping rates, and can be easily reconfigured to handle a variety of blades and propellers.  The project will then extend the technology in scale to design and deploy a RACRS to a V-22 fuselage with reconfigurability to other similarly sized vertical lift vehicles.  In addition to the primary coating removal via the use of lasers, the project will develop reconfigurable robotic systems that would include automated robotic head path planning, sensing, and control to minimize the use of labor in the coating removal process.

    The RACRS program is currently envisioned in three segments:

    1. The development of an ARBSS+ system that will enhance the current installed system at FRC-E into a unit that is more reliable, has a higher stripping rate, and can handle both H-53 and H-60 helicopter blades.  (planned Year 1 dependent on funding)
    2. The development of a stationary RACRS flexible work cell that is the design basis for a full RACRS and whose delivered capability will include the ability to strip H-60 blades.  (planned Year 1 dependent on funding)
    3. The development of a portable RACRS capable of stripping an entire V-22 fuselage, minus the propellers.  (planned Year 2 dependent on funding)
    4. Phase I of the project will develop the engineering approach and design of the enhanced ARBSS system.  In addition, Phase I will begin to define the operational space for the development and deployment of the RACR system for the V-22 aircraft.

    The overall RACRS program will produce the following deliverables:

    1. ARBSS+ unit fully operational and in production at FRC-E
    2. Development and deployment of a RACRS Stationary Work Cell
    3. Development and deployment of a full V-22 RACRS.

    The NCMS Program Manager for RACRS Phase 1 is Chuck Ryan, chuckr@ncms.org, 734-995-4905


    DoD Maintenance Symposium and Exhibition: Tampa, Nov. 15-18 http://www.sae.org/events/dod/

    Plan to join us at the Maintenance Symposium.  In the Great Ideas Competition, three (of six total) CTMA projects are being judged including:

    • Automated Rotor Blade Stripping System
    • Deformation Resistance Welding
    • Inspection and Repair Preparation Cell

    In addition, we plan on being repeat champions for the best large booth competition.  This year the NCMS/CTMA booth (#327) will feature four project teams:

    • Inspection and Repair Preparation Cell
    • Rapid Manufacturing and Repair
    • Laser Stripping of H-53 Helicopter Blades
    • Automated Process and Inspection Guide

    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010
    Read More

    Automated Intensifier Measurement System (AIMS) Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Photos

    NCMS celebrated the deployment of a new automated test capability system for night vision components at the Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD).

    This CTMA collaborative project has developed automated test equipment for night vision tubes to replace the outdated manual test equipment presently used by government and industry. This capability will reduce cycle time for returned night vision devices and significantly reduce costs by increasing the reuse of image intensifier tubes while providing better test repeatability and efficiency.

    [nggallery id=30]

    Some 10,000 tubes are returned annually from the field and are demilitarized (destroyed) due to a lack of retest verification. However, image intensifier tubes “classified for demil” in the field have subsequently successfully passed MIL-specs during re-evaluations. This automated equipment will be capable of rapidly performing all optical A-tests as required by government and industry for image intensifier tubes.

    Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD) is the largest, full-service electronics maintenance facility in the Department of Defense (DoD). TYAD’s mission is total sustainment, including design, manufacture, repair and overhaul of hundreds of electronic systems that include satellite terminals, radio and radar systems, telephones, electro-optics, night vision and anti-intrusion devices, airborne surveillance equipment, navigational instruments, electronic warfare and guidance and control systems for tactical missiles. TYAD is the DoD’s recognized leader in the areas of automated test equipment, systems integration and downsizing of electronics systems.

    Read More

    2010 Modern Day Marine Video

    The latest high-impact promotional video for the United States Marine Corps (USMC) by NCMS Educational Services to highlight the Corps’ Sense and Respond Logistics initiative.  This video is narrated by reknown former Marine Corp Drill Instructor R. Lee Erney.

    NCMS has the capability to create similar videos for your organization.  If you want help reaching your customers please contact:

    NCMS Educational Services General Manager Bill Chenevert at (734) 995-7989 or billc@ncms.org

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector September 2010

    September 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to:

    listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following company into NCMS:

    GM Powertrain – Transmission Manufacturing Engineering (www.gm.com/vehicles/innovation/powertrain-technology/transmissions )

    As the world's largest supplier of automatic transmissions, GM Powertrain is able to offer a wide range of smooth-shifting, reliable and efficient transmissions for cars and trucks.

     


    You Can Still Plan to Join Us at the:

    Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony at Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD)

    Automated Intensifier Measurement System (AIMS)

    Wednesday, 29 September 2010

    This CTMA project has developed and deployed, with TYAD, automated test equipment for night vision tubes which has the ability to replace the outdated manual test equipment presently used by government and industry. This capability will reduce cycle time for returned night vision devices and significantly reduce costs by increasing the reuse of image intensifier tubes.

    If you are interested in attending this ceremony and demonstration, send an email to Debbie Lilu at debral@ncms.org.

     


    Defense Manufacturing Symposium: Tampa, Nov. 15-18 http://www.sae.org/events/dod/

    Plan to join us at the Maintenance Symposium.  In the Great Ideas Competition, three (of six total) CTMA projects are being judged including:

    • Automated Rotor Blade Stripping System
    • Deformation Resistance Welding
    • Inspection and Repair Preparation Cell

    In addition, we plan on being repeat champions for the best large booth competition.  This year the NCMS/CTMA booth (#327) will feature four project teams:

    • Inspection and Repair Preparation Cell
    • Rapid Manufacturing and Repair
    • Laser Stripping of H-53 Helicopter Blades
    • Automated Process and Inspection Guide

    Kudos to the CTMA project: Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools (VALMT), winner of the 2010 R&D 100 Award.

    VALMT, which pioneered an innovative process in volumetric error compensation for large machine tools, is the fifth R&D 100 Award NCMS has received. Widely recognized as the "Oscars of Innovation," the annual R&D 100 Awards honor excellence in high technology products.

    VALMT will save ship and aircraft manufacturers millions of dollars.  Machine tool calibrations used to take an entire week. VALMT allows the same process to be performed in a day. The benefits of this technology aren’t just time savings; it will allow for more accurate parts, reducing or eliminating expensive re-work during assembly.

    The CTMA project teamed private industry (Automated Precision Inc., The Boeing Corporation, Siemens Energy and Automation, and MAG Cincinnati Machine, LLC) and the Department of Defense (Warner Robins Air Force Logistics Center, Naval Foundry and Propeller Center, Fleet Readiness Center East, and the Anniston Army Depot) , quickly developing the groundbreaking technology affordably, and with less risk than alternative “go it alone” R&D methods.

    Winners of the R&D 100 Awards are selected by an independent judging panel and the editors of R&D Magazine. The publication and its online portal serve research scientists, engineers, and other technical staff members at high tech industrial companies and public and private laboratories around the world.  In addition to the award, Northrop-Grumman recently selected VALMT to improve accuracies on their large-volume machine tools used for production of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

    The NCMS contact is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, 734-995-4930.


    Save the Date: 2011 CTMA Symposium

    April 4-6

    Quantico, VA


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010
    Read More

    NCMS VALMT Team Wins Innovation “Oscar”

    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) today announced that its Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools (VALMT) project has been honored with a R&D 100 Award. VALMT, which pioneered an innovative process in volumetric error compensation for large machine tools, is the fifth R&D 100 Award NCMS has received. Widely recognized as the "Oscars of Innovation," the annual R&D 100 Awards honor excellence in high technology products.

    "VALMT will save ship and aircraft manufacturers millions of dollars," said NCMS Vice President Chuck Ryan. "Machine tool calibrations used to take an entire week, with VALMT the same process can be performed in a day. The benefits of this technology aren’t just time savings; it will allow for more accurate parts, reducing or eliminating expensive re-work during assembly."

    The NCMS Collaborative R&D Process teamed private industry (Automated Precision Inc., The Boeing Corporation, Siemens Energy and Automation and MAG Cincinnati Machine, LLC) and the Department of Defense (U.S. Air Force Logistics Center, Naval Foundry and Propeller Center, U.S. Navy Fleet Readiness Center East, and the U.S. Army Anniston Depot) for the VALMT project, quickly developing the groundbreaking technology affordably, and with less risk than alternative “go it alone” R&D methods.

    “The secret to the success of NCMS R&D is collaboration,” said NCMS President & CEO Rick Jarman. “Collaboration maximizes benefits and reduces risk and cost. This award is the latest validation that the NCMS collaborative model works.”

    Winners of the R&D 100 Awards are selected by an independent judging panel and the editors of R&D Magazine. The publication and its online portal serve research scientists, engineers, and other technical staff members at high tech industrial companies and public and private laboratories around the world.

    R&D 100 is not the only award to honor VALMT: the technology also received a coveted Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award for outstanding cooperative efforts on technology development between government, industry and academia (the seventh for NCMS). Northrop-Grumman recently selected VALMT to improve accuracies on their large-volume machine tools used for production of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector August 2010

    August 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies into NCMS:

    Parker SCITech Group, LLC (www.parkerscitech.com) Parker SCITech Group is a consulting organization focused on systems engineering, information assurance and program management for manufacturing and engineering organizations.General Lasertronics Corporation (www.lasertronics.com) General Lasertronics designs and manufactures semi-custom laser-based coatings removal, surface treatment and cleaning systems for military, commercial aircraft and nuclear decontamination applications.


    Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony at Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD)

    Automated Intensifier Measurement System (AIMS)

    Wednesday, 29 September 2010

    This CTMA project has developed and deployed, with TYAD, automated test equipment for night vision tubes which has the ability to replace the outdated manual test equipment presently used by government and industry. This capability will reduce cycle time for returned night vision devices and significantly reduce costs by increasing the reuse of image intensifier tubes. Some 10,000 tubes are returned annually from the field and are demilitarized (destroyed) due to a lack of retest verification. However, image intensifier tubes “classified for demil” in the field have subsequently successfully passed MIL-specs during reevaluations. This automated equipment will be capable of rapidly performing all optical A-tests as required by government and industry for image intensifier tubes.

    Implementation of this automated test capability will provide better test repeatability, reproducibility, and improve cycle time versus the present manual test equipment.

    If you are interested in attending this ceremony and demonstration, send an email to Debbie Lilu at debral@ncms.org.

     


    Recently Completed CTMA Project: Legacy Lifecycle Management

    DoD Participants:  Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center (OC-ALC); Defense Logistics Agency (DLA); Letterkenny Army Depot (LEAD); Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) East

    This CTMA project had two primary objectives:

    1. Develop and demonstrate technologies to assist ballooning and first article inspection (FAI) processes on 2D raster image drawings which would bring at least some of the CTMA PLM for Six Sigma benefits to the DoD world of legacy parts.
    2. Demonstrate a web-enabled, secure collaboration environment for sharing International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and/or Export Administration Regulations (EAR) restricted data with suppliers.

    To assist ballooning processes, the project team developed intelligent Optical Character Recog­nition (OCR) technology with a dictionary that includes General Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T) symbols as well as both machine generated and handwritten alpha-numeric symbols. Artificial intelligence built into the OCR technology allows it to “learn” with use so that recognition accuracy improves over time. A key feature of the solution is that it divides the drawing into zones, separating drawing from title and notes blocks, which enables the use of specialized dictionaries for each zone, also improving recognition accuracy.

    To demonstrate a secure supplier collaboration environment, the project team leveraged learn­ing from the Transatlantic Secure Collaboration Program (TSCP) which had already defined the requirements and architecture for a web-enabled system. Team partner Rolls-Royce was also a member of the TSCP and therefore had access to information not publically available. The foundation on which secure collaboration rests is a digital certificate system that requires State Department registration for companies that will receive restricted data (suppliers) plus a digital certificate from Certipath that can be used to validate both individual identity and company authorization to work with restricted data.

    The NCMS contact is  Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, 734-995-4930.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010
    Read More

    Automated Intensifier Measurement System (AIMS) Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

    NCMS will celebrate the deployment of a new automated test capability system for night vision components at the Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD).

    This CTMA collaborative project has developed automated test equipment for night vision tubes to replace the outdated manual test equipment presently used by government and industry. This capability will reduce cycle time for returned night vision devices and significantly reduce costs by increasing the reuse of image intensifier tubes while providing better test repeatability and efficiency.

      Some 10,000 tubes are returned annually from the field and are demilitarized (destroyed) due to a lack of retest verification. However, image intensifier tubes “classified for demil” in the field have subsequently successfully passed MIL-specs during re-evaluations. This automated equipment will be capable of rapidly performing all optical A-tests as required by government and industry for image intensifier tubes.

    Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD) is the largest, full-service electronics maintenance facility in the Department of Defense (DoD). TYAD’s mission is total sustainment, including design, manufacture, repair and overhaul of hundreds of electronic systems that include satellite terminals, radio and radar systems, telephones, electro-optics, night vision and anti-intrusion devices, airborne surveillance equipment, navigational instruments, electronic warfare and guidance and control systems for tactical missiles. TYAD is the DoD’s recognized leader in the areas of automated test equipment, systems integration and downsizing of electronics systems.

     

     

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    NCMS Project Uses Laser to Remove Paint From Helicopter Blade

    This robotic laser stripping system is capable of removing paint from a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter blade in less than two hours – a time savings of 75% over hand-sanding. The laser system is so precise that it can remove only the top layers of paint, leaving the primer layer intact and not damaging the blade substrate.  When it was done by hand, technicians wore hazmat suits and worked in sweltering heat with toxic stripping chemicals.  Even a small mistake could result in irreparable damage to a $110,000 helicopter blade. This elegant laser system removes that risk. It’s going to save the Department of Defense about 80% in blade refurbishing costs, not to mention the huge time savings.

    For more information about this project please contact Phil Callihan, NCMS Executive Director of Communications, at (734) 995-2046 or email philc@ncms.org.

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    CTMA Project Approvals

    ctma_web_formal

    The following CTMA projects were recently approved:

    Corrosion Resistant Solid State Thin-Walled Component Joining for Maintenance and Repair Applications

    This project is specifically targeting one of the more challenging classes of weld repair and fabrication – thin-walled components.  Thin-walled components often require the use of the highest skilled welding artisans within the depot infrastructure due to the intricate nature of avoiding burn through and component thermal warping.  To avoid this, thin-walled components (common in nearly every military platform) are often over-engineered or buttressed with thicker metal reinforcements.  These countermeasures add significant unwanted weight to the platform and also increase the corrosion prone weld filler regions that results from conventional welding.  This project seeks to develop and test a new solid state joining method that does not melt the materials to be joined thus increasing dimensional accuracy, corrosion resistance, and weld cycle time.

    The new state-of-the-art technology to be explored in this project stems from the use of a novel manufacturing method called Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW), which can be utilized to join a wide variety of thin-walled components common to virtually every DoD platform.  Further, the DRW technology can be readily retrofitted into any depot facility for rapid utilization as the fundamental technology is based upon the well-known principles of resistance spot welding yet applied to large components of many shapes and sizes.

    Improved Stealth and Lower Cost Operations for U.S. Naval Ships using High-Performance Cordage Deck Edge Netting

    The U.S. Navy uses two styles of deck edge netting:  metallic cord netting that is durable but very heavy and difficult to repair shipboard as well as add to a ship’s radar cross section.  The other netting that is used is nylon netting that is lightweight and has no radar signature but need to replaced every 18 to 24 months due to UV degradation, shrinkage and abrasion.  This project will evaluate a new cordage net that is lightweight, has no radar signature and has a Navy tested life of five years. This netting is machine-made and promises reduced lifecycle cost.

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    The CTMA Connector July 2010

    July 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies into NCMS:

    One Network Enterprises, Inc. (www.onenework.com)

    One Network Enterprises provides planning, execution, and business intelligence applications built on a federated cloud computing platform. Committed to embrace, not replace, existing technology, One Network enables companies to achieve unprecedented visibility and collaboration that supports synchronized end-to-end business processes, improved insight, and better decision-making.

    SenGenuity (www.sengenuity.com)

    SenGenuity's mission is to bring to market highly differentiated sensor solutions based on Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) and Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) technologies.


    Navy Maintenance and Repair Project Partnership (NMRPP)

    Using Navy funds MIPR’ed through the CTMA Cooperative agreement, the NMRPP program is specifically focusing upon technology needs at the shipyards.  Three projects are currently being formed:

    Reduction and Control of Emissions During Metal Cutting Operations

    This project will include 3 phases:

    • Identify internal/external shipboard cutting strategies/methods most effective for various shipboard locations; define tools, standards and processes to support cutting for disposal of an Aircraft Carrier in an environmentally safe way of comparable productivity; as applicable, develop computer models to demonstrate feasibility and performance of proposed concepts; establish goals and metrics to analyze feasibility; document findings and recommendations.
    • Finalize design concept(s) selected in Phase I, complete R&D to develop working cutting solution, fabricate prototype to evaluate developed cutting strategies;  validate design concept using laboratory testing; develop testing procedures to measure effectiveness and develop plan for installation/testing onboard ship in drydock; demonstrate technology of the cutting system, including maintenance and performance, in contractor's facility.
    • Develop testing procedures to measure effectiveness of system; develop plan for installation/testing onboard ship in drydock; provide detailed plan for software certification and validation as required.

    Catapult Laser Alignment Position Measurement Automation

    The phases of this project include:

    • Identification of potential technology improvements for laser alignment measurement/cost effective automated metrology technologies, with documented benefits/possible gaps.  Baseline minimum improvements desired include movable alignment fixture that simultaneously measures fourteen catapult component positions for electronic record, via mounting laser displacement sensors on a rigid fixture.  Potential for development of a laser system that establishes a reference plane using three of four catapult reference end points, and auto centers to each end point during measurement.
    • Finalize design concept of Phase I, complete R&D to develop a working automated measurement solution, fabricate a prototype to evaluate developed measurement strategies.
    • Demonstrate the technology of the proposed automated measurement system.

    New Technology Metal Deposition Repair for Navy Ship/Submarine Components

    NUWC Keyport, NCMS, and Project Partners will implement existing metal deposition technologies to develop repair processes for high value Fleet components in support of PSNS&IMF.  NUWC Keyport has identified a number of shipyard repair applications in need of improved repair processes.  Scope of project will be to perform component selection/ROI analysis, repair process development, metallurgical analysis and obtain NAVSEA certification approval for up to three Fleet components.  Specific deliverable will be NAVSEA approved repair processes which enable components to be reissued to the Fleet.

    The NCMS Program Manager for NMRPP is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, 734-995-4930.


    Recently Approved CTMA Project: Corrosion Resistant Solid State Thin-Walled Component Joining for Maintenance and Repair ApplicationsDoD Participants:  U. S. Army – PM Tactical Vehicles (TACOM); U.S. Army –TARDEC; U.S. Marine Corps – PEO Land Systems; U.S. Marine Corps Systems Command – Director Ground Transportation & Engineering Systems; U.S. Marine Corps – CG LOGCOM

    The DoD continues to seek new welding and joining technologies to decrease repair cycles while increasing weld quality for a wide variety of components.  This project is specifically targeting one of the more challenging classes of weld repair and fabrication – thin-walled components.  Thin-walled components often require the use of the highest skilled welding artisans within the depot infrastructure due to the intricate nature of avoiding burn through and component thermal warping.  To avoid this, thin-walled components (common in nearly every military platform) are often over-engineered or buttressed with thicker metal reinforcements to handle the thermal load of conventional MIG and TIG joining.  These countermeasures add significant unwanted weight to the platform and also increase the corrosion prone weld filler regions that results from conventional welding.  This project seeks to develop and test a new solid state joining method that does not melt the materials to be joined thus increasing dimensional accuracy, corrosion resistance, and weld cycle time.

    The new state-of-the-art technology to be explored in this project stems from the use of a novel manufacturing method called Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW), which can be utilized to join a wide variety of thin-walled components common to virtually every DoD platform.  Further, the DRW technology can be readily retrofitted into any depot facility for rapid utilization as the fundamental technology is based upon the well-known principles of resistance spot welding yet applied to large components of many shapes and sizes.

    The NCMS Program Manager is Chuck Ryan, chuckr@ncms.org, 734-995-4905.

    Recently Approved CTMA Project: Improved Stealth and Lower Cost Operations for U.S. Naval Ships using High-Performance Cordage Deck Edge Netting

    DoD Participants:  Naval Surface Warfare Center – Carderock Division;  Naval Sea Systems Command

    At present, the U.S. Navy uses two styles of deck edge netting:  metallic cord netting that is durable however is very heavy and difficult to repair shipboard as well as add to a ship’s radar cross section.  The other netting that is used is nylon netting that is lightweight and has no radar signature.  However, the nylon nets typically get replaced every 18 to 24 months due to UV degradation, shrinkage and abrasion. QinteQ North America, Technology Solutions Group developed a cordage net that is lightweight, has no radar signature with a Navy tested life of five years. This netting is machine-made and finished to custom sizes and promises reduced lifecycle cost.

    The primary objective for this project is to extend the use of High-Performance Cordage Deck Edge Netting (HPC DEN) in lieu of nylon strap netting by installing developmental square HPC DEN Spectra/polyester cordage aboard a U.S. Navy test fleet that will be determined.  The number of nets is dependent upon the vessel that will be available for the net installation.

    The estimated cost savings are based on the assumption that a ship set currently costs $30K to $40K for eighteen to twenty-four months of life in addition to testing costs at the twelve month interval.  The new HPC DEN cordage has a life expectancy of six years at a cost of $40K which would provide a projected cost savings of $80K.

    The estimated readiness benefit is based on the elimination of two to three other maintenance requirements and adding one month to ship readiness.  The assumption is the new netting is projected to last four years longer that the current netting   If one year equates to one week, one month would be added to ship readiness.

    The NCMS Program Manager is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010
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    Technology Showcase Report- Albany, Georgia

    The Technology Showcase at the MCLB - Albany Maintenance Center was presented by the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) in partnership with the Office of the Secretary of Defense.  This Technology Showcase provided industry with critical face time in front of Depot leaders, maintenance personnel and other support entities to learn firsthand what the Marine Corps needs, followed by a display of state-of-art private sector solutions.

    During the two day event, representatives from twenty companies demonstrated their technologies in an open house format available to all base personnel.  Solutions included a revolutionary unique item identification and tracking technology, handheld fluid analysis tools, portable automated wire test sets, and custom training development and e-Learning.  Attendees also had the opportunity to tour the maintenance facility and speak with the engineering and technical staff.  Many of the technologies displayed were identified as possible solutions for the maintenance center.


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    The CTMA Connector June 2010

    June 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies into NCMS:

    Accio Energy, Inc. (www.accioenergy.com)

    Accio Energy is making distributed wind energy systems scalable, reliable, ad affordable with Aerovoltaic energy systems that directly convert wind energy to electricity without any moving parts.  Accio Energy Aerovoltaic energy systems offer the low cost of big windmills with the modularity and flexibility of solar.  It’s a new director in wind energy.

    Pratt & Miller Engineering and Fabrication, Inc. (www.prattmiller.com)

    Providing clients with leading-edge engineering and low-volume manufacturing solutions, Pratt & Miller is a world-class engineering company and a respected industry leader in automotive, commercial, military, and aerospace industries.  Their range of design, engineering, manufacturing, and vehicle program management capabilities are among the most sophisticated in the world.

    StandardAero Redesign Services, Inc. (www.standardaero.com)

    StandardAero is one of the largest independent Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul businesses in the world, providing comprehensive services to commercial, military, business aviation, helicopters and industrial operators.  StandardAero is ISO 9001-2000 Quality System certified as well as FAA/Transport Canada certified.

    Gravikor, Inc. (www.gravikor.com)

    Gravikor is a global leader in the development and implementation of state-of-the-art spaceframe and structural weight reduction technologies to the military and security markets.

    Milspray Military Technologies (www.milspray.com)

    Milspray is an accomplished defense company specializing in high performance and special purpose military coatings, RESET services and the manufacturing of systems and products geared for military readiness sustainability and environmental considerations.

    PDQ Precision Inc. (www.pdqprecision.com)

    PDQ Precision manufactures and distributes the Mini-Max Cleaning and Waste Management equipment and technology.  This system is used to clean such items as electronics, weapons, fiber optics, food service and medical products, etc., in complete safety to the user, environment, and the item being serviced. It contains waste to solid entrapment, and eliminates the waste water stream!

    Seica Inc. (www.seica.com)

    Seica is a global supplier of automatic test equipment and selective soldering systems.  They offer completely automated, laser-based selective soldering solutions, as well as a complete line of test solutions, which include bed of nails and flying probe testers.  These have the ability to perform manufacturing defect analysis, in-circuit tests, functional tests and optical tests of loaded boards, second and third level electronic modules and printed circuit boards.

    SpaceForm Welding Solutions Inc. (www.spaceformtech.com)

    SpaceForm Welding Solutions is an advanced welding technology company set up to commercialize the patented Deformation Resistance and Super-Mig Welding processes as a way to cut costs and improve production throughput.


     

    NCMS Technology Showcase at the Marine Corps Maintenance Center (MCA)receives lots of local interest The latest NCMS/CTMA Technology Showcase was held 8,9 June at the Maintenance Center in Albany, Georgia.  With over 20 companies participating in the Showcase, and tremendous involvement from the command and staff at MCA, the event garnered attention from the local media in Albany.  Click or paste the links below to get a flavor of the Showcase.

    http://www.walb.com/Global/story.asp?S=12623394

     

    http://www.mysouthwestga.com/news/video.aspx?list=194939

     

    http://www.albanyherald.com/news/headlines/95921444.html

     

    http://www.walb.com/Global/story.asp?S=12613317

     

    http://www.mysouthwestga.com/news/story.aspx?id=467888

     

    http://www.topix.com/military/marine-corps-logistics-base-albany/2010/06/mca-hosts-technology-showcase

    We are targeting the next Technology Showcase to be at Warner Robins Air Logistics Center in late September or early October.  Then we plan to go to FRC-SW (North Island) early next year. Stay tuned for details.


    Recently Completed CTMA Project: Modernization of Nickel Electroplating

    DoD Participants:  Corpus Christi Army Depot; Fleet Readiness Center Southwest

    Electroplating is an essential process used at Department of Defense (DoD) depots during overhaul of aircraft, ships, tanks, small arms, and other weapons. It is primarily used for corrosion protection and resizing of worn parts. Electroplating is expensive to perform in terms of labor, materials, energy and environmental costs.

    This CTMA project was the latest in a series of four projects involving implementation of revolutionary commercial electroplating methods that resulted in improved product quality and major cost savings at military depots. The initial three projects successfully applied approaches to hard chrome plating, while this CTMA project successfully extended the concept to nickel electroplating.

    During the project, innovative masking and nickel electroplating methods were designed and tested on aircraft parts requiring refurbishment by the Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD) and the Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) Southwest. These methods had been used by project part­ners in recent commercial plating applications but had not been used by military depots. The innovations included:

    • No-mask fixtures – The no-mask concept, which was implemented during previous CTMA hard chrome plating projects, was relatively new to nickel electroplating. No-mask fixtures were custom-designed to particular parts and they replaced generic masking methods such as use of wax and tapes. No-mask anodes provide numerous advantages, including significant cycle time and labor cost reductions as well as reduced generation of hazardous waste.
    • Conforming anodes – When used in place of conventional tank anodes during nickel electroplating, conforming nickel anodes improve the uniformity of deposit, increase plating speed and significantly reduce the overall plating time.
    • Out-of-tank plating – Out-of-tank plating refers to the practice of electroplating internal surfaces of parts without sub­merging the parts into a plating tank. This is achieved by placing a part on a surface near a plating tank and continuously pumping plating solution though custom tooling connected to internal bores or cavities of the part that serve as small plating cells. Out-of-tank plating avoids the need to mask the entire part and minimizes the danger of hydrogen embrittlement associated with exposing metal parts to acid solutions. Again, this method proved to save time, costs and environmental waste.

    At each location, depot engineering staff selected a part for project consideration that was difficult or impossible to effectively plate using conventional means. The project involved several stages of prototype tooling design, fabrication and testing.

    Overall, implementation of these advanced plating methods provides a number of key advantages over conventional practices:

    • Eliminates labor intensive masking and demasking steps
    • Minimizes formation of “trees” (nodules of nickel or chromium, usually electrodeposited on edges of parts)
    • Provides more uniform deposits
    • Reduces plating times
    • Reduces subsequent machining time
    • Reduces dangers associated with hydrogen embrittlement
    • Uses less energy
    • Creates less hazardous waste.

    The part selected by CCAD (AH-64 Blade Tip Cap) did not have an approved repair process prior to the project and used parts were discarded as scrap metal. Therefore, an opportunity existed for immediate savings.

    The part selected by FRC Southwest (Rotodome Gearbox Housing) had an existing repair pro­cess, however, that method was expensive and time consuming to perform and often resulted in rejected parts and rework.

    At the conclusion of the project, a final set of production tooling was supplied to CCAD and FRC Southwest and employee training was performed.

    Based on the success of prototype tooling tests, CCAD is conducting a demonstration/validation project and is expecting to fully implement the process for the selected part during CY 2010. FRC Southwest is continuing tests of the equipment and is also expected to implement the technology during CY 2010.

    The projected savings that follow are for the two components included in this project only:

    CCAD

    • Net savings of $717, 600 over three years.
    • Continuous supply of critical blade tip caps (currently blades are discarded as non-repairable).

    FRC Southwest

    • Net savings of $890,880 over three years.
    • 45% faster turnaround time for plating/machining repair process.

    Earlier project phases showed similar savings for hard chrome plated components. A calculation based on the number of DoD facilities refurbishing plated parts times the number of unique plated parts could result in over $50M in savings over three years coupled with an even more important benefit of getting our weapon systems back into the field quicker.

    The NCMS contact is  Bill Chenevert, billc@ncms.org, 734-995-7989.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010
    Read More

    The CTMA Connector May 2010

    May 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following company into NCMS:

    The POM Group, Inc. (www.pomgroup.com)

    The POM Group, Inc. is a full service provider of technologies and services for Rapid Product Development.  POM specializes in the design and build of Direct Metal Deposition (DMD™) additive manufacturing systems which provide solutions for our clients in the Automotive, Aerospace, Mining, Oil & Gas and Nuclear and Defense industries.


    Participate in our fourth Technology Showcase

    at the Marine Corps Maintenance Center, Albany, GA

    June 8-9, 2010

    Marine Corps Logistics Base, Albany Maintenance Center, Albany, Georgia.

    Register at https://www.ncms.org/SSL/2010MCLB/registration.htm

    A block of rooms are reserved at the Hilton Garden Inn Albany.  Please go to the NCMS website for additional information regarding accommodations.  Please reserve your rooms early.  The room block will be released Friday, 21 May.

    This is an exclusive opportunity for NCMS members to display technologies for managers, engineers, and artisans at the Marine Corps Logistics Base, Albany Maintenance Center, Albany, Georgia.   The Albany Maintenance Center has provided a technology needs list that highlights many opportunity areas for industry.  For those that are interested in obtaining more information regarding their mission, functions, products, services and forward ops please refer to this website http://www.logcom.usmc.mil/maintctr/

    The Maintenance Center is interested in learning more about:

    • Reverse Engineering capabilities
    • Corrosion Prevention technologies
    • Training
    • Data management
    • Fluid analysis for field and FARM applications
    • Automation Technologies
    • Technologies to reduce water usage
    • Technologies to reduce or reuse waste streams
    • Technologies that will reduce energy usage or provide renewable capabilities.
    • Embedded technologies/predictive maintenance capabilities
    • Advanced surface repair equipment
    • Lasers
    • Upgraded CNC equipment
    • Plant equipment management tools (CFAMs)
    • Heat treating capabilities.
    • Hardening (Case), carburization, artificial aging of aluminum, stress relief/stabilization, annealing, etc.

    For more information regarding this exciting opportunity please contact Ms. Debbie Lilu at debral@ncms.org or call 734-995-7038.


     

    NCMS Technology Showcase Brings Industry Innovation to FRC East On 28 – 29 April, FRC East hosted a Technology Showcase sponsored by the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) through its Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities program (CTMA). The showcase brings leading technology companies into the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities to see first hand the challenges faced by the maintenance community in order to identify innovative commercial solutions. The Technology Showcase opened with NCMS member companies first touring the FRC East maintenance facilities. Next on the agenda were table top displays, strategically located throughout the depot to ensure easy access for all base personnel to see the technologies.. The table top displays provided industry representatives a unique opportunity to learn about challenges faced directly by the maintainers. The first day concluded with a networking event at the “The Pitt.” The final day was dedicated to one-on-one industry presentations with base personnel on solutions with immediate potential for deployment. The Technology Showcase is a powerful example of how the CTMA Program fast tracks innovative technical solutions from private industry directly into the hands of DoD personnel to increase systems availability while reducing cost. NCMS members displaying technology included DIT-MCO International, Aging Aircraft Consulting, LLC, Superior Controls, iMAST/ARL (Penn State), Stratasys, Eclypse International, Adapt Laser Systems, Automated Precision, Inc., Aerowing, Imaginestics, LLC, Spatial Integrated Systems, Inc., Spectro Inc., GSA Service Company, POM Group, REI Systems, Inc., and Pendaran Inc., Three CTMA projects have been identified to immediately meet FRC East needs:

    • Wiring Shop Modernization - upgrade the capability to build and test wiring harnesses, currently very labor and time intensive.
    • Automated Robotic Blade Stripping System (ARBSS) - Provide a reliability upgrade and training. In addition, assess the challenges for wider deployment of automated paint stripping technology.
    • Large Area Inspection of Composite Parts- evaluate and identify improved methods for detecting damage to composite aircraft components.

    Recently Completed CTMA Project: Light Armored Vehicle (LAV) Sense & Respond Support System – Phase III

    DoD Participants:  U.S. Army (TACOM); Program Manager – Light Armored Vehicles (PM-LAV);  U.S. Navy – Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Crane; U.S. Marine Corps –   Camp Pendleton’s LAV Company School of Infantry (West)

    There are currently three different approaches to logistics and supply chain management being utilized in the commercial world and throughout the DoD. The three approaches are: mass-based logistics, just-in-time logistics, and portions of Sense & Respond logistics. The U.S. Marine Corps is seeking to rapidly advance from a mass-based logistics approach to a Sense & Respond logistics approach. Testimonial for this fact is demonstrated in a number of Marine Corps future warfare concepts such as Operational Maneuver from the Sea (OMFTS), Seabasing, Joint Vision 2010, and Sea Power 21.

    LAV III was the third phase of the PM-LAV strategy to embrace Logistics Modernization and build on knowledge gained during the LAV Condition-Based Maintenance (CBM) Life Cycle Logistics Support Tool CTMA project. Asset health monitoring and the required support infrastructure were refined to enable scalable and web-based access to the end user. Sense & Respond saw the maturation of the Joint Asset Management Information Support System (JAMISS) as a tool designed to enable presentation of vehicle data in a coherent fashion in a scalable format for the end user. LAV III validated the “Best in Breed” selection of hardware, software and firmware designed to meet the PM’s requirements for a system designed around flexibility and reliability in the end-to-end Enterprise architecture environment.

    One of the principal lessons learned during LAV I & II was that in order to achieve maximum benefit, there must be a sophisticated data support infrastructure in place. A system must be designed to capture the “right” data and then securely transmit the data throughout the Enterprise. For that reason, data movement, security and the ability to comply and operate in the DoD’s exceptionally restrictive Information Assurance (IA) architecture were viewed as essential functionalities for the system as a whole. Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 140-2 encrypted capabilities which conform to DoD approved wireless communication protocols were matured. The Local Maintenance Server (LMS) installed by NSWC Crane during LAV II at Camp Pendle­ton’s School of Infantry (West) continued to serve as a gateway for data moving to the Enterprise server at Crane, IN and into the Enterprise as a whole.

    In order for data coming off of the vehicle platform to have value the data must be viewed as actionable by the appropriate stakeholder. The value or value proposition of actionable data is customer specific. Customers in the Enterprise range from the Marine who maintains the individual vehicle on the ramp up to and including the PM who has a holistic view of the fleet, each with a different view of what “actionable” means. Building on lessons from LAV II the PM and industry partners developed a list of key data items viewed as important to PM stakeholders up and down the chain of command. The agreed upon list of data para­meters was collected and reported throughout the course of LAV III. The collection of the “right” data was further validated against a comprehensive Reliability-Centered Main­tenance (RCM) analysis performed at the beginning of LAV III.

    PM-LAV strongly believes the architecture implemented and further validated operationally during the LAV III project is designed to meet the operational needs of not only the LAV community but is scalable for all DoD ground vehicle fleets. The continued maturation of hardware, software and Enterprise functionali­ties in LAV III closely mirrors what PM-LAV seeks to implement across its entire vehicle fleet. Moving forward with the implementation of refined, web-based Software-as-a-Service (SAAS) applications, scalable common opera­tional pictures, Item Unique Identifier (IUID) technology and increasingly reliable, unobtru­sive hardware solutions is the envisioned goal. LAV III data formatting, encryption methodo­logies and vehicle network development meet commercial and DoD standards and are designed for implementation independently or in parallel with other Autonomics Logistics (AL) or GCSS-J developmental efforts. A visionary approach to data parsing and event triggers will yield maximum effectiveness in the highly restrictive, limited-tactical-bandwidth environment to gain maximum benefit of technology for users at all levels.

    The LAV III project incorporated advanced commercial Sense & Respond logistics tools on the LAV-25, a complete legacy platform. The principals and hardware developed and proven during this project have a demonstrated cap­ability to transfer easily and economically to other legacy and state-of-the-art weapon systems platforms. The ability to leverage this technology across multiple platforms enables reproducible capabilities across the DoD. The benefits of this project include:

    • An estimated 10% reduction in required maintainer man-hours realized through implementation of Sense & Respond principals. The project has consistently demonstrated the value of the JAMISS tool as a way to reduce maintenance man-hours.
    • An estimated 30% man-hour savings in maintenance support operations by embracing IUID off-platform. The value of automatically having data “pushed” off-platform into the maintenance system means greater accuracy and less man-hours spent transcribing data from the platform to the maintenance system.
    • Maintainers will accurately and efficiently monitor system health, predict equipment failure, diagnose malfunctions, request assistance, and order necessary parts on an LAV A2. The continued maturation of the LAV Sense & Response Support System (scan tool) designed to allow maintenance personnel to evaluate the health of the vehicle on the ramp at the maintenance depot.
    • Remove-and-replace actions and no-evidence-of-failure rates will be reduced substantially, saving time, money and requiring fewer support personnel. The battery health monitor allows for identification of specific battery failures and system electrical component failures such as alternators and voltage regulators. Additional diagnostic items such as tracking fuel pump voltage allows for identification of fuel pump failure where it was not possible to identify a failure until the vehicle actually stalled from fuel starvation.
    • Troubleshooting, diagnosis, and repair times will be reduced both at the depot and in the field to improve overall readiness rates. Greater accuracy of such items as total shots fired through the 25mm Bushmaster main gun enable maintenance personnel to send vehicles to Inspect and Repair Only as Necessary (IROAN) based on more accurate data which increases the life of the system (gun barrel and breech), reduces cost by extending the life of the barrel and increases availability.
    •  Efficiencies derived from this project will reduce overall LAV lifecycle costs and improve operational availability. The ability to provide aggregated data and tracking of such items as battery life, accurate 25mm barrel life (shots fired), fuel pump usage, speed and miles driven all allow for reduced maintenance cycle time, cost avoidance, increased reliability and vehicle availability.
    • Increase in LAV availability equal to the equivalent of 34 vehicles (LAV Company+) at no additional cost to the Marine Corps.
    • Project savings in cost of operations of $10M per year in the LAV fleet.

    The NCMS contact is  Debbie Lilu at debral@ncms.org. 734-995-7038.


    2010 CTMA Symposium "Sustaining Technology Through the 21st Century"

    The 11th Annual CTMA Working Symposium was held 22-24 March at Quantico. The Symposium included briefs from each of the services on their process for determining maintenance requirements, as well as project briefs from DoD sponsored programs involving sustainment.  Officials from each of the services discussed their maintenance technology requirements and their approach to new technologies.  In addition, project reviews for CTMA projects as well as projects from selected other DoD-sponsored programs highlighted new technologies targeted for implementation in the maintenance community.

    Presentations will be made available to non-participants in July.

    We would like to also thank the following companies for their sponsorship of the Symposium:


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010
    Read More

    SAVE THE DATE- Technology Showcase Albany, Georgia

    Please plan to participate in our next Technology Showcase.

    DATE:            June 8-9, 2010

    LOCATION:    Marine Corps Logistics Base, Albany Maintenance Center, Albany, Georgia.

    This is an exclusive opportunity for NCMS members to display technologies for managers, engineers, and artisans at the Marine Corps Logistics Base, Albany Maintenance Center, Albany, Georgia.

    • Reverse Engineering capabilities
    • Corrosion Prevention technologies
    • Training
    • Data management
    • Fluid analysis for field and FARM applications
    • Automation Technologies
    • Technologies to reduce water usage
    • Technologies to reduce or reuse waste streams
    • Technologies that will reduce energy usage or provide renewable capabilities
    • Embedded technologies/predictive maintenance capabilities
    • Advanced surface repair equipment
    • Lasers
    • Upgraded CNC equipment
    • Plant equipment management tools (CFAMs)
    • Heat treating capabilities.
    • Hardening (Case), carburization, artificial aging of aluminum, stress relief/stabilization, annealing, etc.
    Contact Debbie Lilu at debral@ncms.org (734) 995-7038 for more information.
    Read More

    Robotics Technology Consortium Announces Research Projects

    Universities, Research Labs, and Companies Innovate to Develop Future Ground Vehicle Technologies

    Ann Arbor, MI., April 22, 2010 – The Robotics Technology Consortium, Inc. (RTC) today announced that the Government has awarded 19 projects funding totaling $7 Million. These teams will undertake the research required to further develop innovative technologies that add capabilities to currently deployed unmanned ground vehicles and enhance future unmanned ground systems.

    The winning team leads and projects are:

    • Vecna Corporation – “Advanced Hydraulic Actuation”
    • Autonomous Solutions, Inc. – “Long Range Obstacle Detection”
    • Carnegie Mellon University – “Online Long Range Obstacle Detection with Fused LADAR and Imagery”
    • SET Corporation – “Long Range Obstacle Detection”
    • Pelican Mapping – “3D Scene and Model Visualization”
    • RE2, Inc. – “Conformal Robotic Hand”
    • Carnegie Mellon University – “Generic Aided INS for Small UGVs”
    • University of Michigan – “Heuristics-enhanced Dead-reckoning System for Small Robot Navigation”
    • Think-A-Move, Ltd – “Speech Signature Based Biometric Security”
    • Carnegie Mellon University – “Robotic Evaluation of Tunnel Mapping and Navigation Sensors”
    • Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) – “Counter Tunnel Mapping and Characterization”
    • Foster-Miller, Inc. – “Remote Checkpoint”
    • HDT Engineering Services, Inc. – “HDT Highly Dexterous Manipulator System”
    • Sarnoff Corporation – “Multi-sensor Fusion for Reliable On-the-Move Pedestrian Detection and Tracking”
    • General Dynamics Robotics Systems, Inc. – “Ground Vehicle Sensor Suite (GVSS)”
    • Innovative Technical Solutions Inc. dba NovaSol – “UGV Lasercomm Interrogator”
    • Sarnoff Corporation – “3D Friend and Foe Detection”
    • TORC Technologies – “Robotic Building Blocks for Unmanned and Autonomous Systems”
    • Carnegie Mellon University – “Advanced Command and Control for High Speed Tele-Operation"

    In May 2008, the RTC entered into a $170M Other Transactions Agreement (OTA) with the Department of Defense to better enable nontraditional defense contractors to undertake technical projects on behalf of the Government. Since then, the Government has awarded a total of 37 projects, worth $17M involving 47 member companies, universities, and non-profit organizations.

    "The RTC model has shown the ability to stimulate innovation, encourage teaming, and get vital research projects under contract quickly" said Mr. Jose Gonzalez, Acting Director, Land Warfare and Munitions, "Because of these successes, it is being looked at as a model for other industries".

    Membership to the Robotics Technology Consortium is open to US based companies, non-profits, and universities.

    About Robotics Technology Consortium

    The Robotics Technology Consortium (RTC) is a non-profit, industry organization created in 2008 to speed the creation and deployment of ground robotics technology for the Defense Department and other Government organizations. The consortium was established to meet a need identified by the Office of the Secretary of Defense Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (OSD/JGRE). The RTC currently has a membership of 200 large and small commercial companies, academic institutions, and non-profit organizations. The RTC seeks to solicit and engage companies and organizations that may not have historically performed work for the Defense Department and other Government organizations in addition to traditional defense contractors.

    For more information, visit http://www.roboticstechc.org/.

    About NCMS

    The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) is the largest cross-industry collaborative research and development consortium in North America, and is the only consortial effort in the U.S. devoted exclusively to manufacturing technologies, processes and practices. NCMS has nearly 25 years of experience in the formation and management of complex, multi-partner collaborative R&D programs, and is backed by corporate members representing virtually every manufacturing sector.

    For more information, visit http://www.ncms.org.

    Read More

    Register Now! Technology Showcase Update- FRC East- Cherry Point, NC

    REGISTER NOW!
    You have until COB Wednesday 4/21
    to sign-up for our third Technology Showcase
    FRC East, 28-29 April, 2010.

    Please plan to participate in the third Technology Showcase to be held April 28-29, 2010.

    This is an exclusive opportunity for NCMS members to display technologies for managers, engineers, and artisans at the Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) East Maintenance Center in Cherry Point, North Carolina. The first day of the event will be for technology displays followed by a day of follow-up meetings with FRC personnel on potential applications.

    FRC East is currently interested in the following technologies:

    • Cleaning
    • Data Collection Management
    • Non-Destructive Inspection
    • Dimensional Measurement
    • Stripping/Coating Removal
    • Coating/Plating Technologies
    • Direct Digital Manufacturing
    • Surface Finishing
    • Analysis
    • Composites

    For more information please contact:

    NCMS Program Manager Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org (734) 995-7038.

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector April 2010

    April 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following company into NCMS:

    Messier-Dowty, Inc. (www.messier-dowty.com)

    Messier-Dowty is a designer and manufacturer of landing gear systems and components for commercial, regional and business aircraft applications as well as landing gear assemblies for military aircraft applications.  They also provide repair/overhaul and support for landing gear systems.


    NCMS Members - Join us at the

    Next Technology Showcase: Fleet Readiness Center East (Cherry Point, NC):

    28-29 April

    This is an exclusive opportunity for NCMS members to display technologies for managers, engineers, and artisans at the Fleet Readiness Center East Maintenance Center in Cherry Point, North Carolina. The first day of the event will be for technology displays followed by a day of follow-up meetings with FRC personnel on potential applications.

    FRC East is currently interested in the following technologies:

    • Cleaning
    • Data Collection Management
    • Non-destructive Inspection
    • Dimensional Measurement
    • Stripping/coating Removal
    • Coating/plating Technologies
    • Direct Digital Manufacturing
    • Surface Finishing
    • Analysis
    • Composites

    Registration for this NCMS networking event is at https://www.ncms.org/SSL/2010FRCeast/registration.htm.

    The NCMS coordinator for the Showcase is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.

    MARK YOUR CALENDAR: Technology Showcase, Marine Corps Maintenance Center, Albany, GA on 8-9 June 2010.


    Call for Project Ideas

    The AMRDEC Engineering Directorate Manufacturing Science and Technology (MST) Division and the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM) have announced their FY10 Project Call. The NCDMM website (http://www.ncdmm.org/ncdmm_about_project_call.cfm) has additional information. This year's project call is encouraging traditional manufacturing and machining projects as well as projects dealing with advanced materials process development for application to DoD weapon system development, production and sustainment efforts.  Projects are targeted at $50-100K with period of performance of 1 year or less.  Project submission date is May 21 to NCDMM.  

    The NCDMM contact is Shawn Nesmith, shawn.nesmith@ncdmm.org, (724) 539-4772.  


    Recently Completed CTMA Project: OptiCAM

    DoD Participants:  Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center (OC-ALC); Fleet Readiness Center East (FRC-E); Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS); Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard (PHNS); Portsmouth Navy Shipyard (PNS); Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNS); Tobyhanna Army Depot (TYAD); U.S. Coast Guard – Aircraft Repair & Supply Center; NAVAIR Pax River

    Many current weapons systems are held in service beyond their originally intended lifetime. As these systems age, parts fail or wear to the point of rendering the system not mission capable. Depots, as the source of last resort, often find themselves needing to make replacements. All too often the technical data for a needed part is either missing or incomplete. For those cases, the depot must reverse engineer the part, constructing a Technical Data Package (TDP) sufficient to manufacture the part. Reverse engineering includes metrology to determine geometry and recovering manufacturing information on material properties, surface finish and so forth plus business information such as original equipment manufacturer (OEM) name, part number, etc.

    When the Optical Generation of 3D Models for Computer-Aided Manufacturing (OptiCAM) project began in mid-2003, the principal 3D scanning technologies were manual measure­ments, laser scanning, and coordinate measuring machine (CMM) data with new technologies such as laser interferometry coming on but not yet ready for prime time. There is no one-size-fits-all solution for scanning needs. Selection of scanning technology depends on the size and reflectivity of the object to be scanned, scanning accuracy required, and the ultimate application of scan data. The greatest need at project launch was for a portable, rugged, low-cost accurate scanner that could handle parts of a size fitting in a one meter cube, and that was established as a project goal.

    The project met or exceeded all goals.

    Goal 1 – Portable, rugged and low cost but accurate scanner. Spatial Integrated Systems (SIS), Inc.’s prototype VZX scanner uses high-resolution digital video imaging with a parallax algorithm for calculating range. The scanner met or exceeded every design goal including:

    Part Size: 20” x 10” x 13”

    Part Weight: 28 lbs.

    Operating temperature: 32°F to 122°F

    Storage temperature: 14°F to 140°F

    Power requirements: 110V

    Interface requirements: Ethernet

    Accuracy: 0.005”

    Goal 2 – Easy transformation of “Cloud of Points” to 3D solid model. There were two aspects to this goal with the first being transformation from raw range data points to a 3D surface model and from there to a 3D solid model. Producing a full 3D scan requires capturing data from at least six views. Most systems require the use of stick-on targets and human intervention for accurate alignment (registration) of the views, but OptiCAM detects part features (edges, corners, etc.) and uses that information to perform registration without human intervention in most cases. Imageware™ software converts the registered cloud of points to a surface model. The surface model can be delivered as is to a variety of solid free form manufacturing machines to make a prototype part for function and fit tests. An experienced 3D modeler can relatively quickly transform the surface model to a solid by selecting features and joining them.

    Goal 3 – Development of a complete Reverse Engineering environment. SIS, Inc. has launched a reverse engineering service accessible via the Internet at http://www.nc-aa.com/sites/osandbox/default.aspx. The site is a portal supporting secure file management and access to web services. Siemens PLM Software’s Teamcenter provides the portal software. In addition, all participating depots are to receive at their option a full suite of the Teamcenter software used by the project.

    The technology is now available commercially, and is well positioned to save the Department of Defense (DoD) approximately $500K annually in reverse engineering cost reduction. The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) in a July 2007 report summarized benefits that could be achieved by adding 3D data to the TDP of active legacy parts defined only by 2D data. The study found that for active complex legacy parts where OptiCAM is most ideally suited to economic development of 3D models, the potential annual savings of doing so would be $10,634,537.

    DLA also found and quantified indirect benefits of such a program:

    ·   47% increased likelihood of receiving responses to Request for Quotation (RFQ)

    –   More competition leads to lower prices to DLA

    ·   25% reduction in scrap and rework

    –   Lower manufacturing costs lead to lower prices to DLA

    ·   83% increase in accurate costs estimates

    –   Reduced “risk factor” included in costs leads to lower prices to DLA

    ·   66% increase in assurance that the data is complete and accurate

    –   Reduced “risk factor” included in costs leads to lower prices to DLA

    ·   83% reduction in DLA technical support

    –   Less DLA/time/resources/cost required and shorter lead times

    ·   Electronic data is reuseable for engineering changes/future production

    –   Less engineering, less manufacturing costs lead to lower prices to DLA

    ·   92% higher degree of accuracy for the production data package and production planning

    –   Reduces manufacturing time/costs, leads to lower prices to DLA.

    The NCMS contact is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, 734-995-4930.


    2010 CTMA Symposium "Sustaining Technology Through the 21st Century"

    The 11th Annual CTMA Working Symposium was held 22-24 March at Quantico. The Symposium included briefs from each of the services on their process for determining maintenance requirements, as well as project briefs from DoD sponsored programs involving sustainment.  Officials from each of the services discussed their maintenance technology requirements and their approach to new technologies.  In addition, project reviews for CTMA projects as well as projects from selected other DoD-sponsored programs highlighted new technologies targeted for implementation in the maintenance community.

    Presentations will be made available to non-participants in July.

    We would like to also thank the following companies for their sponsorship of the Symposium:


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010
    Read More

    The CTMA Connector March 2010

    March 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    We welcome the following companies into NCMS:

    adapt laser systems, LLC (www.adapt-laser.com)

    adapt laser systems offers innovative laser cleaning technology for industrial surface treatment, cleaning and paint removal applications.  Their laser technology removes contaminants, production residue and coatings without damaging the substrate.

    George Washington University (www.ncac.gwu.edu)

    George Washington University is a private, non-profit institution of higher education based in Washington, D.C.  The University provides education and training services, primarily for students at the undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral levels, and performs research, training, and other services under grants, contracts, and similar agreements with sponsoring organizations, primarily departments and agencies of the U.S. government.

    Dr. Diesel Technologies (www.drddieseltech.com)

    Dr. Diesel Technologies (DDTS) provides the latest diagnostic technologies to the heavy duty military vehicle community.  DDTS' key products include Diagnostic Analyzes Test Set (DATS), Diagnostic software and rugged embedded PC's.

    Claxton Logistics Services, LLC (www.claxtonlogistics.com)

    Claxton Logistics Services provides Logistics management consulting services.  In addition, Claxton provides maintenance support, logistics engineering support, and supply chain management development and implementation services to the Department of Defense and Industry.

    Technical Objectives Professionals, LLC (TOP Inc.)

    Technical Objectives Professionals, LLC is a veteran owned small business specializing in maintenance solutions.  Technical Objectives Professionals has worked closely with government and industry partners developing the future of today’s war fighter, bringing technology to the battle field, and bringing legacy vehicles into the modern arena of maintenance.  Providing maintenance solutions in every clime and place.

    Kitsap Economic Development Alliance (www.kitsapeda.org)

    Kitsap Development Alliance is a partnership of government and business, which attracts and retains primary businesses to Kitsap County and its individual communities, to ensure healthy growth.

    Pendaran Inc. (www.pendaran.com)

    Pendarin is a training and consulting firm specializing in real-time, effective implementation support for organizations striving to become lean.

    Plasan Carbon Composites (www.plasancarbon.com)

    Plasan Carbon Composites is a tier 1 supplier of automotive body panels to OEM’s.  All parts are carbon fiber based.  Plasan Carbon specializes in providing Class-A surface parts, and bonded assemblies.


    Next Technology Showcase: Fleet Readiness Center East (Cherry Point, NC):

    28-29 April

    This is an exclusive opportunity for NCMS members to display technologies for managers, engineers, and artisans at the Fleet Readiness Center East Maintenance Center in Cherry Point, North Carolina. The first day of the event will be for technology displays followed by a day of follow-up meetings with FRC personnel on potential applications.

    FRC East is currently interested in the following technologies:

    • Cleaning
    • Data Collection Management
    • Non-destructive Inspection
    • Dimensional Measurement
    • Stripping/coating Removal
    • Coating/plating Technologies
    • Direct Digital Manufacturing
    • Surface Finishing
    • Analysis
    • Composites

    Registration for this NCMS networking event is at https://www.ncms.org/SSL/2010FRCeast/registration.htm.

    The NCMS coordinator for the Showcase is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.

    MARK YOUR CALENDAR: Technology Showcase, Marine Corps Maintenance Center, Albany, GA on 8-9 June 2010.


    Debra K. Tune, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Logistics, will be headlining the CTMA Symposium AgendaDebra K. Tune, a member of the Senior Executive Service, is Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Logistics, and performing the duties of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Installations, Environment and Logistics, Washington, D.C. She is responsible for the management policy and oversight of logistics strategic planning for the Air Force, to include maintenance, supply chain and weapon system life cycle support. Mrs. Tune also overseas two other departments responsible for policy and oversight of installations, military construction, base closure and realignment, environment, energy, safety and occupational health issues.

    Not too late to join us next week: 2010 CTMA Symposium "Achieve Technology Collaboration", March 22-24, 2010, Quantico, VA https://www.ncms.org/SSL/Symposium2010/registration.htm

    The 11th Annual CTMA Working Symposium will be held 22-24 March at Quantico. With the theme, “Requirements Driven Technology Insertion”, the Symposium will include briefs from each of the services on their process for determining maintenance requirements, as well as project briefs from DoD sponsored programs involving sustainment.  Officials from each of the services will discuss their maintenance technology requirements and their approach to new technologies.  In addition, project reviews for CTMA projects as well as projects from selected other DoD-sponsored programs will highlight new technologies targeted for implementation in the maintenance community.

    The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.

    We would like to also thank the following companies for their sponsorship of the networking breaks during the Symposium:


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010
    Read More

    The CTMA Connector February 2010

    February 2010

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    Maj. Gen. Nickolas G. Justice, Commanding General of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command will be headlining the CTMA Symposium Agenda As the Commanding General of RDECOM, Justice leads a worldwide organization of more than 17,000 scientists, engineers and other professionals who keep the Army on the cutting edge of technology through the operation of subordinate research and development centers and laboratories. His joint service experience includes a two year assignment at the Sixth Allied Tactical Air Force as Chief, Project Management for Command and Control Systems. During this assignment, he participated in Operation Desert Storm, as part of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. During Operation Iraqi Freedom, he served as Commander of the Information Management Task Force in Kuwait and Iraq.

    REGISTER NOW: 2010 CTMA Symposium "Achieve Technology Collaboration", March 22-24, 2010. https://www.ncms.org/SSL/Symposium2010/registration.htm

    The 11th Annual CTMA Working Symposium will be held 22-24 March at Quantico. With the theme, “Requirements Driven Technology Insertion”, the Symposium will include briefs from each of the services on their process for determining maintenance requirements, as well as project briefs from DoD sponsored programs involving sustainment.  In addition to Maj. Gen. Justice, officials from each of the services will discuss their maintenance technology requirements and their approach to new technologies.  In addition, project reviews for CTMA projects as well as projects from selected other DoD-sponsored programs will highlight new technologies targeted for implementation in the maintenance community.

    The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.

    We would like to also thank the following companies for their sponsorship of the networking breaks during the Symposium:


    Next Technology Showcase: Fleet Readiness Center East (Cherry Point, NC) - New Date: 28-29 April

    Our third technology showcase is being held 28-29 April at the Fleet Readiness Center East.  This is a chance to bring your technologies to the attention of the managers, engineers, and artisans at the FRC maintenance center.  In addition to the open showcase, selected participants will also be able to brief FRC East engineers about their technology in closed meetings.  Registration for this NCMS networking event is at https://www.ncms.org/SSL/2010FRCeast/registration.htm.

    The NCMS coordinator for the Showcase is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.


    Recent Project Completions: Optical Generation of 3D Models for Computer-Aided Manufacturing (OptiCAM)

    With weapons systems held in service well beyond their originally intended lifetime, parts fail or wear to the point of rendering the system mission incapable. Depots often find themselves needing to make replacements. All too often the technical data for a needed part is either missing or incomplete. For those cases, the depot must reverse engineer the part, constructing a Technical Data Package (TDP) sufficient to manufacture the part.

    This project achieved three goals:

    Goal 1 – Portable, rugged and low cost but accurate scanner. Spatial Integrated Systems (SIS), Inc.’s VZX scanner uses high-resolution digital video imaging with a parallax algorithm for calculating range.

    Goal 2 – Easy transformation of “Cloud of Points” to 3D solid model. There were two aspects to this goal with the first being transformation from raw range data points to a 3D surface model and from there to a 3D solid model. Producing a full 3D scan requires capturing data from at least six views. Most systems require the use of stick-on targets and human intervention for accurate alignment (registration) of the views, but OptiCAM detects part features (edges, corners, etc.) and uses that information to perform registration without human intervention in most cases. Imageware™ software converts the registered cloud of points to a surface model. The surface model can be delivered as is to a variety of solid free form manufacturing machines to make a prototype part for function and fit tests. An experienced 3D modeler can relatively quickly transform the surface model to a solid by selecting features and joining them.

    Goal 3 – Development of a complete Reverse Engineering environment. As a result of this project, participant SIS, Inc. has launched a reverse engineering service accessible via the Internet at http://www.nc-aa.com/sites/osandbox/default.aspx. The site is a portal supporting secure file management and access to web services. Siemens PLM Software’s Teamcenter provides the portal software. In addition, all participating depots are to receive at their option a full suite of the Teamcenter software used by the project.

    Surface models can now be quickly generated with 0.005" accuracy for parts sized 20"x10"x13" or less and will soon produce $500,000 annual savings to DoD in performing reverse engineering.

    The NCMS contact is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, 734-995-4930.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    Read More

    2010 CTMA Symposium "Sustaining Technology Through the 21st Century...and Beyond," March 22-24, 2010

    Early registration is now available for the 11th Annual Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) Working Symposium being held March 22-24 in Quantico, Virginia

    The Symposium will include briefs from each of the armed services on their process for determining maintenance requirements, as well as project briefs from Department of Defense (DoD) sponsored programs involving sustainment.

    This event offers the unique opportunity to network with technology providers and DoD personnel while displaying technology.

    For more information please contact:

    NCMS Program Manager Debbie Lilu at (734) 995-7038 or debral@ncms.org.

    Read More

    Technology Showcase- Fleet Readiness Center East- Cherry Point, NC

    Please plan to participate in our third technology showcase to be held April 28-29, 2010.

    This is an exclusive opportunity for NCMS members to display technologies for managers, engineers, and artisans at the Fleet Readiness Center East Maintenance Center in Cherry Point, North Carolina.  The first day of the event will be for technology displays followed by a day of follow-up meetings with FRC personnel on potential applications.

    For additional information please contact:

    NCMS Program Manager Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org (734) 995-7038.

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector January 2010

    January 2010Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    Plan to Participate: 2010 CTMA Symposium "Sustaining Technology Through the 21st Century... and Beyond", March 22-24, 2010.

    The 11th Annual CTMA Working Symposium will be held 22-24 March at Quantico. The Symposium will include briefs from each of the services on their process for determining maintenance requirements, as well as project briefs from DoD sponsored programs involving sustainment.

    The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.


    Next Technology Showcase: Fleet Readiness Center East (Cherry Point, NC) - New Date: 28-29 April

    Our third technology showcase is being held 28-29 April at the Fleet Readiness Center East.  This is a chance to bring your technologies to the attention of the managers, engineers, and artisans at the FRC maintenance center.  In addition to the open showcase, selected participants will also be able to brief FRC East engineers about their technology in closed meetings.

    The NCMS coordinator for the Showcase is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.


    Recent Project Approvals:

    Rapid Access to Readiness-Essential (RARE) Parts through Rapid Manufacturing & Repair (RM&R) Technologies DoD Participants: TRF Kings Bay; NUWC Keyport; NFPC Philadelphia; NAVAIR China Lake; Portsmouth Naval Shipyard; Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard; FRC East; FRC Southeast; Anniston Army Depot; Tobyhanna Army Depot; OC-ALC. Rapid Manufacturing, also known as additive manufacturing (AM), is a transformational manufacturing paradigm expected to supplant traditional machining and tooling processes for the fabrication of select products. This revolutionary technology builds net shape or near net shape parts layer by layer directly from CAD. Additive technologies allow part design freedoms not possible with traditional fabrication methods. Complex-multiple part configurations can be constructed in a single build, thus allowing reduction in the numbers of component parts needing assembly.

    The objectives of the CTMA Rapid Manufacturing & Repair RARE parts program are to:

    • Introduce DoD organic maintenance activities to the range and capabilities of additive technologies and the benefits that can be derived
    • Introduce AM technologies as timely solutions to RARE part replacement (legacy parts, obsolete parts, parts no longer available due to diminishing manufacturing resources)
    • Insert AM capabilities into the DoD organic maintenance base
    • Facilitate the deployment of AM technologies, which now range from TRL/MRL 8 to 9 depending upon the part to be fabricated, throughout DoD organic maintenance base
    • Advocate and instigate AM industry advancements and maturation to mature to TRL/MRL 9 to 10 respectively.

    Sense and Respond Logistics: LAV IV DoD Participants: USMC, Light Armored Vehicle Training Company, School of Infantry (West) Camp Pendleton; USMC, PM-LAV; Marine Corps System Command; NSWC Crane; Marine Corps Maintenance Center, Albany This project continues to build off the successes of the first three phases of the project by expanding the scope and deployment within the Marine Corps, particularly:

    • Examine accurate indicators to induct assets into depot maintenance so that time and money are not wasted on assets that can be repaired more efficiently in the field while ensuring that assets requiring depot level maintenance receive it.
    • Explore the enormous capabilities that IUID marked items enable. In the Sense and Respond environment that has been developed in previous phases of this project we have built an infrastructure that is uniquely able to capture, use and understand the value of IUID.
    • Two pilot projects at PMLAV and Distance Support, Crane in RCM analysis and IUID marking of vehicles and components. Benefits of this project include:
    • Projected savings in cost maintenance of $32M per year in the LAV fleet
    • Increase in Light Armored Vehicle availability of 5% which is equal to the equivalent of 40 vehicles (LAV Company +) at no additional cost to the Marine Corps. The cost to replace these vehicles would be ~ $60M.
    • This project will enable maintainers to accurately and efficiently monitor system health, predict equipment failure, diagnose malfunctions, request assistance, and order necessary parts on LAV A2.
    • The LAV Depot community will benefit by receiving vehicles for rework using condition based induction.
    • The safety and sensor date collected during this effort can be returned to Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to assist with possible platform design improvements.

    The principals and hardware developed and proven during this project will transfer easily and economically to other legacy weapon systems, making the benefits reproducible across the Department of Defense. The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    © 2010
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    Technology Showcase- Fleet Readiness Center East (Cherry Point, NC)

    Please plan to participate in our third technology showcase to be held April 28-29, 2010.  This is a chance to bring your technologies to the attention of the managers, engineers, and artisans at the Fleet Readiness Center East maintenance center in Cherry Point, North Carolina.

    For additional information please contact:

    NCMS Program Manager Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org (734) 995-7038.

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    NCMS Project Team Collects Defense Manufacturing Award

    Don Bell (WR-ALC), Sam Easley (Boeing), Ben Thompson (FRC-East), Rick Jarman (NCMS),

    Rich Curless (MAG Industries), Lisa Phelps (Boeing)

    Members of Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools (VALMT) project team collect the Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award at the 2009 Defense Manufacturing Conference.  It is the seventh such award for NCMS.  The Defense Manufacturing Excellence Awards are presented by the National Center for Advanced Technologies (NCAT) for outstanding cooperative efforts on technology development between government, industry and academia.

    The VALM project team pioneered an innovative process in establishing a new methodology in volumetric error compensation for large machine tools.  The costs for current assembly practices of measuring and fitting are substantial; reducing the amount of reworking of machined parts during onsite vehicle assembly will save the Department of Defense (DOD) and the commercial aircraft industry millions of dollars. 

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    The CTMA Connector December 2009

    December 2009

    Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    CTMA Project Wins Defense Manufacturing Award at the DoD Defense Manufacturing Conference

    The CTMA project "Volumetric Accuracy for Large Machine Tools (VALMT)" was recognized at the recent Defense Manufacturing Conference with a Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award, the seventh award of its kind given to NCMS/CTMA for its outstanding cooperative efforts on technology development between government, industry and academia.

    The VALMT project pioneered an innovative process in establishing a new methodology in volumetric error compensation for large machine tools. The costs for current assembly practices of measuring and fitting are substantial; reducing the amount of reworking of machined parts during onsite vehicle assembly will save the Department of Defense (DOD) and the commercial aircraft industry millions of dollars. “This groundbreaking process will dramatically reduce assembly and fitting costs which represent up to 1% of the total cost per aircraft, ” said Sam Easley, Engineer/Scientist, Metallic Processes at The Boeing Company. "On large programs like the F-18 or the 700 aircraft series, we could save $100 million per year."

    “VALMT has the potential to save the U.S. Navy money and shave valuable time off of vessel construction costs, putting assets where they are most needed, with the warfighter.” said Faris Ibrahim, Mechanical Engineer of the Naval Foundry and Propeller Center.

    The VALMT project teamed private industry (Automated Precision Inc., The Boeing Corporation, Siemens Energy and Automation and MAG Cincinnati Machine, LLC) and the DOD (U.S. Air Force Logistics Center, Naval Foundry and Propeller Center, U.S. Navy Fleet Readiness Center East, and the U.S. Army Anniston Depot) using the NCMS R&D collaborative process to quickly develop this groundbreaking technology.  “The success of the VALMT project rests heavily on the technical expertise and collaborative R&D experience of the NCMS and its partners,” stated Richard Curless, CTO at MAG Industrial.

    The NCMS Program Manager is Tony Haynes, tonyh@ncms.org, 734-995-4930.


    Next Technology Showcase: Fleet Readiness Center East (Cherry Point, NC)

    Plan to participate in our third technology showcase to be held during the week of February 22 (exact date still being arranged).  This is a chance to bring your technologies to the attention of the managers, engineers, and artisans at the FRC maintenance center.  Further details will be available after the first of the new year.  The NCMS coordinator for the Showcase is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.  Send her an e-mail if you are interested in participating.


    Potential CTMA Project seeking participants:

    Lightweight Structure Fabrication Using Deformation Resistance Welding

    Current DoD Participants: Marine Corps Maintenance Center, Albany; Marine Corps Maintenance Center, Barstow; Army Project Manager, Light Tactical Vehicles; Marine Corps Program Executive Officer, Land Systems

    The DoD is facing severe challenges in their tactical ground combat equipment to provide added ballistic protection and survivability to the warfighters, but the added weight increases rollover events, and decreases vehicle performance such as fuel economy, speed, and acceleration.  In addition, vehicle suspension and engine wear are further taxed by the added weight.

    This project will work with the PM-Tactical Vehicles to identify weight savings opportunities on the HMMWV applicable to currently fielded vehicles.  The project will:

    1. Design an appropriate solution retrofit structure applicable to the deformation resistance welding (DRW) method for the HMMWV,
    2. Fabricate the retrofit DRW subcomponent/frame,
    3. Mount the subcomponent/frame onto the platform,
    4. Validate the performance of the retrofitted platform,
    5. Assess the technology as a repair manufacturing method for other systems such as pipe repair on ships.

    The NCMS Contact is Chuck Ryan, chuckr@ncms.org, 734-995-4905.


    Save the Date: 2010 CTMA Symposium "Achieve Technology Collaboration", March 22-25, 2010.

    Location: The Clubs at Quantico, Marine Corps Base, Quantico, Virginia.  Expect to learn about the services technological needs, discuss the new technology roadmap now under development, and to review current CTMA project efforts in addition to tabletop displays and extensive networking opportunities.  Stay tuned for more information.  The NCMS contact is Debbie Lilu, debral@ncms.org, 734-995-7038.


    We appreciate your feedback. Please contact Chuck Ryan with suggestions or input on other topics that would be of interest to you in this newsletter. The CTMA Program is sponsored by the Department of Defense; the content of this newsletter does not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the government; no official endorsement should be inferred.

    Read More

    The CTMA Connector November 2009

    November 2009Welcome to The CTMA Connector, a monthly newsletter designed to provide news and ideas about the Commercial Technologies for Maintenance Activities (CTMA) program. The CTMA program is a joint Department of Defense/National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (DoD/NCMS) effort promoting collaborative technology development between industry and the DoD maintenance and repair facilities. This newsletter highlights ongoing projects, serves as a forum for promoting new project ideas, and provides other news of interest to the program. Our goal is to stimulate your participation and solicit your input. Feel free to submit items for the newsletter as well as any suggestions to make it more useful. More information about the program can be found at http://ctma.ncms.org/.

    To subscribe or unsubscribe to the CTMA Connector, send a message to listserv@listserv.ncms.org with "subscribe CTMANewsletter" or "unsubscribe CTMANewsletter" in the message body.


    NCMS Booth at DoD Maintenance Symposium Wins Award

    At the recent DoD Maintenance Symposium, the NCMS/CTMA booth was voted best large booth by the Symposium participants.  Following a nautical theme, the booth showcased the CTMA program as well as four CTMA projects including Kinetic Spray Processing, Automated Process and Inspection Guide, Fast Field Fluid Analysis, and Electronic Performance Support Systems.  Thanks to Debbie Lilu for coordinating the booth effort.


    Recently Completed CTMA Projects:

    Test Program Set (TPS) Migration System

    DoD Participants: Warner Robins Air Logistics Center; Fleet Readiness Center East; Tobyhanna Army Depot)

    The Test Program Set (TPS) Migration System project was undertaken to provide lower migration costs, for depot Automated Test Systems (ATSs) and their support lifecycles, when equipment modernization is required.  The United States Air Force (USAF) repair depot at Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (WR-ALC) is charged with maintenance and repair of a wide variety of weapon systems.  ATSs are employed to facilitate diagnosis and repair of failed and suspect weapon system components.  The depot is in a period of modernization due to a high number of its ATS equipment sets rapidly nearing the end of their usefulness.  These ATSs are being upgraded with modern supportable commercially equivalent test platforms that are developed to take the Air Force repair capability forward for another extensive period.  Hardware replacement costs for the ATSs are estimated to be in the area of $20M, holding aside associated non-recurring engineering (NRE).  Along with the ATS hardware there is a wide variety of existing test applications that run on the legacy equipment.  There is a huge NRE investment in these applications rivaling the hardware costs by orders of magnitude.  In order to maintain the investment in these applications, they must be ported and reintegrated to operate on the new equipment whenever possible to avoid cost burdens stemming from test application re­writes.  Some test applications are highly test platform specific and are tightly bound to the ATS that they are meant to operate.  Other test applications were written with technologies that help facilitate their migration to platforms that also support the employed technology.  The focus of this TPS Migration System effort was to employ commercial technologies to minimize costs by maintaining the NRE already invested in the legacy test applications.

    Initially the project evaluated emerging technologies for migrating test applications when ATS are modernized or upgraded.  This capability analysis led to a more pragmatic focus on existing commercially available environments that held promise in resolving the cost issues with porting legacy applications to the new generation systems.  An existing off-the-shelf test application development environment was selected for its capability to be deployed on various personal computer controlled systems.  The development tool selected, called PAWS, is an Abbreviated Test Language for All Systems (ATLAS) test application development and runtime system. ATLAS is an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standard for test application development.  The predominant quantities of test applications requiring migration to modern systems at the WR-ALC depot are currently written in the ATLAS language.  TPS Migration System demonstrated the ability to employ the commercially available PAWS technology, allowing test applications written in ATLAS to be retargeted on the modern platforms with minimized rework.  In conjunction with the test environment integration that was necessary and the test applications rehost that were performed, the TPS Migration System technical team also developed comprehensive test application rehost training for the WR-ALC development staff.  The resulting three-day training course provided explicit and detailed information for application developers performing rehosts.  All major pitfalls and difficulties that might occur were presented, analyzed, and resolved with extensive presentation and textual material (Appendix A) allowing the developers to anticipate and diffuse potential rehost barriers.

    Potential Benefits

    The technical team integrated the PAWS environment on a target platform supplied by the WR-ALC depot.  The WR-ALC personnel identified three representative test applications that they currently were running on a legacy Army Integrated Family of Test Equipment (IFTE).  After the PAWS integration was accomplished to sufficient level to accommodate the selected applications, two of the applications were ported to a simulated runtime and one application was fully integrated.  The fully integrated test application was